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    What about performing sentiment analysis on all those commit logs?

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      Haha I’d think most commit messages would be a little too dry/robotic to get a good sentiment reading on? What do you think?

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        I’m reminded of once reading about a team that set up their computers to take a webcam snapshot of the developer’s expression (face) when a git conflict occurred.

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          Well… I was bored the other day which led me to just posting this… https://lobste.rs/s/0zxoap/suggested_improvements_for_tool

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          I’d say low compilation/synthesis time. Waiting minutes at a time for each run will ruin you.

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            True since the beginning of software development!

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            Saturday I’m heading up to New Hampshire to learn about motorcycle suspension.

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              Did you ever read Trevitt’s book?

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              A lot of comments here are about individual actions, which are all great—but part of the point of my article is that joint political action is that much more powerful.

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                Sure it is, but like you said:

                Thing is, policy-makers aren’t doing very much.

                What makes you think they will change their mind? We are not even voting them out of office. Quite the opposite.

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                  Lasting change won’t happen until we are better represented.

                  When is the first Lobste.rs user going to run for federal office?

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                In places where biking isn’t possible (too long, not safe, etc.), I think WFH is probably the best way to reduce CO2/NOx/etc. My list would be:

                1. Work from home
                2. Eat local food
                3. Ecological home improvements (solar panels, hybrid water heaters, etc.)

                The last is important if you’re doing the first. ;-)

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                  If someone can run arbitrary programs inside your container they already have plenty of access, so adding Manhole doesn’t seem like much of a security risk.

                  Actually, this makes it very easy to change a running program and inject a bunch of code without any traceability. So, in terms of doing a post-break in analysis, it might be harder if the intruder used Manhole.

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                    One reason why variables have been abbreviated is because we quickly get bored of typing long names. These days I see more people using longer names with the advent of auto completion. One thing that is not mentioned is how much of a problem this is when a developer is familiar with the abbreviations used.

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                      I have been using autocompletion in text editors and IDEs for 15+ years. You make it sound as if this is a new development.

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                        Of course it’s not a new development, but it has vastly improved in the last 5 years and I believe people have been using it more across many languages.

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                        Seems like an unreasonable request to me.

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                          I’ve been running Homebrew using a custom $HOME-based prefix for years and it works most of the time.

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                            Not to be confused with checking for pointers being non-null in goto-based error handling code.

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                              Quoting for emphasis:

                              A standard workweek in the US is 40 hours a week; elsewhere it can be a little less. Whatever it is, outside those hours you shouldn’t be working, because you’re not being paid for that work. Your evenings, your weekends, your holidays, your vacations—all of these belong to you, not your employer.

                              Every minute you give your employer serves to devalue your time. If you work even an extra couple of hours each day (say, commuting and taking lunch at your desk while working) you have effectively given your employer 10 extra hours a week for free, for an effective pay cut of 20%.

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                                Yep! One of the best things I heard regarding this was from a programmer friend of mine who is also a professional music producer. He said:

                                I consider the time I spend commuting to work to be work time, because every hour I give to my employer is an hour I’m not spending making music. If my employer is gonna take time from my passion, they’re gonna have to pay for it.

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                                  I can only speak for the US, but I feel like I have to comment on this:

                                  I consider the time I spend commuting to work to be work time

                                  I understand and support the sentiment. But if you’re literally counting your commuting time as chipping away at your 40 hours a week (or whatever it is), you should be prepared to explain to your manager how whatever you’re doing on the commute counts as bona fide work or else you’re going to be having a very unpleasant conversation with them.

                                  If you’re fortunate enough to commute on a bus that offers wi-fi, then it’s easy to justify counting that as work time. But if you don’t have a computer in front of you (in the case of jobs like programming that require a computer), you should be circumspect about counting that as “work.” If you’re thinking about work in that time, and your boss is okay with that, then great, but counting commuting time as work is not the norm in the US.

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                                    but counting commuting time as work is not the norm in the US.

                                    Well, perhaps it should be.

                                    They pay you for the time spent walking to meetings, walking to get a smoke, navigating internal documents–and I’d bet my hat that management gets paid the same on golf games, “executive retreats”, “networking”, and other events.

                                    There’s no moral reason not to count time spent commuting as work–it benefits the company, doesn’t benefit you, and is required for the other work to get done.

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                                      I’ve happily taken a nominal pay cut to work from home - I don’t spend that time or money commuting.

                                      Compensation is a negotiation - typically an experienced programmer has several options available. If you want me to work for you and you insist I show up in person, I’m going to demand an extra 20% or more to cover the time I spend traveling and the inconvenience of being out.

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                                        It’s not just in the US. I have yet to discover a place in the world where commuting by car can be considered work.

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                                          It’s unlikely you’ll get paid for it. But when deciding between a nearby job which pays $X and a job an hour further away which pays $X+15%, it’s worth factoring it in to your decision.

                                        2. 1

                                          I understand and support the sentiment. But if you’re literally counting your commuting time as chipping away at your 40 hours a week (or whatever it is), you should be prepared to explain to your manager how whatever you’re doing on the commute counts as bona fide work or else you’re going to be having a very unpleasant conversation with them.

                                          Yes you definitely need to be ready to explain it. One way to look at it is this: businesses charges their customers for every single thing (including delivery). If I’m offering the business my services as an employee, then in a way I’m the business and they’re the customer, thus I’ll charge for delivery just like they do with their customers. Sure business people would argue differently, but business people would also argue that full-time exclusive workers can still be contractors that don’t get paid insurance or what ever it is in your country that they love to not pay for.

                                    1. 2

                                      Installing solar panels on our house with SunWork!

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                                        That’s mostly technobabble in that quora answer.

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                                          I was actually linking the answer by Oliver Emberton, which was on top at the time (#2 right now). Sorry for that.

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                                            I agree… I was hoping for something interesting, not a patent promotion.

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                                            Interesting read. I’d like my cookie now, thanks.

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                                              I’m really excited about Quinn, as it addresses a number of issues I’m trying to mitigate in a replication system I’m designing and implementing in rust:

                                              • a phone switching networks frequently as it’s synchronizing a database
                                              • HOL blocking while sending a mixture of metadata, blocks, and large blobs
                                              • kernel TCP bottlenecks
                                              1. 1

                                                If you’re worried about kernel TCP bottlenecks then you haven’t experienced the UDP bottlenecks. Kernel TCP can do a lot to improve performance.

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                                                  https://conferences.sigcomm.org/imc/2017/papers/imc17-final39.pdf

                                                  ¯_(ツ)_/¯

                                                  I’m curious about your experiences though, what are you specifically thinking of when you say that?

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                                                I don’t understand, what do these documents have to do with the shutdown? There’s no explanation provided.

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                                                  In short:

                                                  Intended use case is to restore access to reference documents by replacing .gov by .rip.

                                                  I added the index for batch access and easy retrieval: for example, searching crystals gives the candidate implementations used during the Post-Quantum Cryptography Standardization process.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    The NIST is a federal agency and so it has been shut down during the negotiations on next year budget source, the csrc is still operating even if is part of the NIST

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                                                      As an outsider, the government literally shutting down seems more than a little insane.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        It’s one of the reasons I didn’t try to get funding from agencies that could get shutdown. I knew another one would come. Then, the progress I made undoing credit damage from Recession might itself be undone. Not to mention the struggle of suddenly having no money for no good reason. I feel for the people affected by it.

                                                        Far as services, I already can’t access quite a few, potential submissions. That doesn’t freak me out, though. What concerns me is people doing inspections of stuff like food might not be paid or working. Good time to buy local and organic, esp stuff that already shipped. ;)

                                                      2. 1

                                                        Yes. But what do these documents have to do with the shutdown?

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                                                          They are useful mirrors during their unavailability due to the shutdown.

                                                          (no leak nor non-NIST related documents here)

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                                                            Ah. I just assumed the website would stay up, with no one in the office to turn it off.

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                                                              If federal offices are anything like state offices, somebody has to pay a bill–even if it is from one department to another.

                                                              Moreover, if federal offices are anything like state offices, it is somebody’s responsibility to make sure their office doesn’t buy anything they won’t be paying for. So, probably the payer asked the payee to shut it off, perhaps even before the next billing cycle.

                                                              Nobody wants to be that one person with nobody behind them if it ever comes down to finger pointing. “Why didn’t you shut the lights off before you left, Bob?”

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                                                                Also shutting it off ensures there are no problems to resolve since it’s off. Can’t be attacked either :-)

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                                                      The project name is a bit confusing since it contains oil and shell (an oil company). I honestly thought this was a talk about the environment. I guess what’s why it’s often abbreviated to OSH.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        Ha, yeah it appears the Shell Oil brand is very strong, stronger than I would have thought :) Oil of course has nothing to do with that!

                                                        FWIW, the story behind the name is basically:

                                                        1. It needs to be 3 characters like a good Unix tool
                                                        2. Oil is what makes your “metal” parts work together, metal being native code in C, C++, etc. It’s lubricant or glue.

                                                        I can also invent something about NJ, Unix, and Standard ML. I grew up in NJ, and Unix was of course invented in NJ at Bells Labs – Richard Gabriel hilariously called it the “NJ style” in his famous “Worse is Better” essay.

                                                        There’s also a programming language called Standard ML of New Jersey, which I suppose was a humorous pun on Standard Oil of New Jersey, the turn-of-the-century monopoly that broke up and became Exxon, Mobil, and a few other companies.

                                                        As far as I understand, Standard ML was basically a collaboration between Bell Labs and Princeton University. Oil uses Zephyr ASDL in its implementation, which was described in a paper by ML expert Andrew Appel at Princeton.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Maybe Unix user account names are canonically 3 characters but I don’t think that really applies to tools and utilities. I would baselessly assert there are more 4 character and 2 character than 3 character tools.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            I always thought it was a pun on Shell the company! :-)

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                                                          I really hope this project succeeds. The lack of open source complete FPGA integrations is sad.

                                                          1. 3

                                                            I’ve had success with yosys + nextpnr + icestorm for a year or so.

                                                            I’m teaching a weekly lunchtime class at work using the BeagleWire as the chosen hardware.

                                                            I’ve also used these tools with the ice40 dev board from lattice.

                                                            Even so, FPGA design is mind blowing coming from decades of writing software. Just today I discovered I have to worry about the phase of the signal when using a counter to slow down a clock signal! argh!

                                                            1. 1

                                                              I’ve read Arduino is releasing something. Is it any good for hobbyists?

                                                              1. 2

                                                                It’s based on Intel/Altera’s proprietary stuff

                                                            1. 4

                                                              There goes BitBucket’s edge (if you don’t consider Mercurial better ;-))