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    Is Raku small? I’m asking because if I’m being pedantic, Raku is not Perl. I’m writing a text based RSS aggregator in Raku, but mainly for learning (I never learned Perl properly either).

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      Is Raku small?

      Raku is probably one of the largest language’s I’ve encountered, on a par with c++ or common lisp.

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        Or one of the smallest at the core :)

        Besides, yes Raku make it seems it covers a lot of ground but due to the uniform approach syntax, you can easily understand what’s happening. Raku keeps giving me a Scheme/Racket-like feel each time I wrap my head around something and realize how much I can compose with every element.

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          FYI, small doesn’t mean language surface area. From the OP:

          (The criteria for a “small” language is one you couldn’t easily find a job for)

          It confused me as well.

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        Just IMHO: this is not really well suited for the target audience, I suspect. Usually, when we say “non-crypto” people, we are referring to people not working in actual crypto (algorithms, implementation), but that understand the basics, like how public key encryption works at a high level, etc (most software engs, for instance). This write up has nothing new for them.

        If by “non-crypto” it is meant “non-techie” people, this is also not very useful. The majority of people using WhatsApp that isn’t a “techie” doesn’t even know what a “server” or a “client” is (not a criticism, just a fact).

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          I’m on holidays, so I’ll work on a hobby project: making a static site generator for markdown files, mostly as a Go learning exercise.

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            Recently wrote my own blog CMS in Go. Have fun! I recommend using goldmark for the markdown parsing and HTML generation.

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              Nice. I wrote my own too and I always encourage others to take the plunge. Look here if you want some inspiration: https://git.sr.ht/~ewintr/shitty-ssg Currently I am in the process of making it less shitty, so I can add some other tools to the same system.

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              Great, now you have one more system to maintain.

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                In my opinion, quite the opposite. I’ll give a concrete example:

                I had my own setup for experimenting with the Nim language, including the tool chain, editors, shell configuration, etc. I had to maintain this for two different systems (macOS and Linux), including different shell semantics, package managers, binary cross compilation and testing. Now I only have to maintain a single container which I can use in both environments. With the added benefit of immutability (ie changes to my “real” system don’t interfere with my sandbox).

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                Trying to get my workflow containerised so this is very cool. Thanks!

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                  Bold move posting to lobste.rs and not using pushover :)

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                    I’m a fair and impartial tyrant.

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                      I hope it didn’t come through as an endorsement for Pushbullet… :) I’ll update it to include Pushover4j (the setup is very similar anyway).

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                      That has to be the only mildly good-looking academic web page on the Internet.

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                        I’ve never found them bad. They convey what they do, well. No extra BS, just content.

                        Styling should be up the the browser’s user in an ideal world, based on hints and context.

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                          haha why is it that academics tend to have the most 90s-ish webpages?

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                            Some people care about information and don’t get off on screwing with CSS and Javascript all day. Especially if they started hacking before hacking was a synonym for screwing with web apps.