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    you can do git checkout - to switch the previous branch. you’ll go back and forth, not down a stack, but usually im only switching one and then going back.

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      I’d never come across range types for times before (https://www.postgresql.org/docs/current/static/rangetypes.html) thanks!

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        tstzrange is absolutely awesome. Especially when you put an index on such a column. You safe so much code and hassling just by letting your DB do it. Performance and consistency included.

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          Agreed. You can even make sure that ranges dont overlap based on some other column(s) in the record.

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            I wrote a prototype Prometheus caching proxy using postgres range types (it’s built around the idea that when dashboard refresh creates a very predictable read pattern and you can stitch together old data and fresh data). It seemed bizarre to cache json from a tsdb in postgres, but indexable range types and operators made prototyping so much easier. https://github.com/shanemhansen/dashcache

            (Disclaimer: this project never really got beyond “seems to work on my machine” status)

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            The range types are great. I was doing some stuff with AWS Redshift recently and was heartbroken to realize that Redshift is based on an older version of Postgres (8.0.2! GWB had just started his second term when that was released! XP was the latest version of Windows! The original iPhone was more than two years in the future!) that lacks them.

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            I’m honestly surprised that it’s so little… I know $8,000 is a lot of money in many places, but given the scale of these attacks I’d have thought a lot more money would have been raised. It must be incredibly tempting to pay - $300 in Bitcoin is nothing compared to the scale of the disruption some companies are experiencing. Hell, if I was CTO in one of the big firms I’d be getting some Bitcoin ready for some future attack where it turns out that paying the ransom is the only real option.

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              If a CTO’s reaction was to get Bitcoin ready for some future attack then that CTO should be fired - backups, regular system maintenance, planning and testing disaster recovery would all mitigate this form of attack.

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                The idea that a CTO can effectively enforce that mandate seems deeply confused to me.

                What size organisations are you working with?

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                  If a CTO cannot ensure that the disaster recovery or business continuity processes work - then in my opinion that CTO has failed, both in their duty to the organisation and in their role as a leader.

                  I have worked at big and small organisations both in the public and private sectors, and worked with both outstanding and incompetent CTO’s. As a leader you are setting the standard that those who work for you will follow.

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                    I agree 100% with @fcbsd on this - DR and BCP are key activities that any CTO must be responsible for.

                    @danielrheath - can you give us more detail on why you think the idea is deeply confused?

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                      At a company with 1500-ish developers and 1000+ in house systems.

                      In a system that size, the CTO can set expectations, but should assume something will be missed. Having a few grand of BTC handy seems like a perfectly reasonable call in case something goes badly wrong.

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                        A CTO should be responsible for DR? Are you sure you dont mean CIO? A CTO should be able to raise the issues with their counterparts and a CTO making sure that DR is implemented is certainly appropriate but I dont understand why they would be responsible for it.

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                          Yes, fair point - DR, et al. is the CIO’s responsibility (certainly from an operational perspective), rather than the CTO’s (assuming the CIO role exists and it hasn’t all been folded into a single CTO role).

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                    Well that’s a good point too. I don’t know, I think BTC will have some use no matter what. I guess it might be good to have it anyway.

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                    Yup, good thinking. I agree it’s little, but I guess they didn’t want to price out the general public. Smarter thing to build in would be to have it analyse how many computers the code can see on the network and price it dynamically, accordingly.

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                      That would make it expensive for students, sitting in a library full of laptops.

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                        True

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                    The object type is a new type in 2.2 that matches any types except for primitive types. In other words, you can assign anything to the object type except for boolean, number, string, null, undefined, and symbol.

                    Did TypeScript have non-nullable types by default before?

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                      The article has been revised since you asked your question. It now reads:

                      In other words, you can assign anything to the object type except for string, boolean, number, symbol, and, when using strictNullChecks, null and undefined.

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                          “by default” :-)

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                            sorry, I didnt actually realize it wasnt a default - ive always used it since it was in beta so I guess I forgot.

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                        I’ve recently dove head first into typescript on a side project - using it for a rest api, server-side app with express and using it for client side js at the same time. I’ve mostly loved every minute of it, everything feels cleaner, safer and faster (development wise). But I would like to understand better how to share types around, both externally defined (like for libraries or built-ins) and for custom defined types that don’t have concrete data structures that go along with it. Plus the best ways to extend externally provided types - to define custom types and keys on an express session for instance. Not necessarily looking for this information here - just a statement that there is a lot of shallow feature declaration information out there but its hard to find deeper understanding of how some of it works.

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                          Learning and reading about new technology and futurism. Reading science fiction and non-fiction. Hiking. Guitar and other music. Figuring how to increase my value as a human.

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                            Read any good sci-fi novels recently?

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                              Not the OP but wanted to mention Seveneves - I really enjoyed it.

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                                Added to my “to-read” pile.Thanks.

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                                  Yes!!! I just finished this - I liked it a lot but not as much as Snow Crash, still a fantastic novel.

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                                    I started this a week ago! Really enjoying it :)

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                                      Ian M. Banks Consider Phlebas and even better The Player of Games. Both part of the Culture series. This is the ONLY science fiction future society that leaves me saying “Sign me up! I’m there!” :)

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                                      The Metamorphosis of Prime Intellect
                                      The Martian

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                                        +1 for The Martian

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                                          +1 for The Metamorphosis of Prime Intellect

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                                          Diaspora by Greg Egan always tops my list.

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                                            Just finished Cat’s Cradle (not obscure but a classic), and now starting on the Foundation trilogy (finally). As stated below, Neil Stephenson’s Seveneves was a veritable page-turner. Also anything by William Gibson.

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                                              Reading up on Stanislaw Lem. Foundation was awesome, but Lem… Summa Technologiae should be taught in schools!

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                                                I tried reading Lem’s Futurological Congress book, but it was just too silly. On the other hand, the Cyberiad somehow hits a sweet spot, it’s one of my favorite books - I made my dad read it to me a lot of times when I was little, and I still really enjoy it.

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                                          It is a good article - I was with him more until his derision of JSON in the db - but still, good stuff.

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                                            beautiful couple. Congrats!