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    I bricked my switch by using a non-Nintendo charger on it a couple years ago. Total PITA. At least Nintendo replaced it under warranty.

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      I think it would be cool to generate MIDI from the pcap info so the user could control the sounds they hear.

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        Great idea! I’d need to google around a bit more for that as I’m pretty clueless about computers+audio stuff. Contributions are also more than welcome!

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        The new Windows terminal is a step up from the old one but I find it silly that I have to edit json to make configuration change to a GUI application.

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          That was kind of a trendy thing there for a minute. Atom originally had no settings GUI, for example. And VS Code exposes all its settings as JSON even though most or all have a GUI as well these days. I never particularly liked it, especially since JSON is painful to edit by hand.

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            I think it started with Sublime Text. (And I think it’s terrible!)

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            There appears to be active work on a UI for Settings. See: https://github.com/microsoft/terminal/pull/8403#issuecomment-747545651

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            I’ve always preferred sftp anyway but I suppose it doesn’t work well for some people’s workflows.

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              If you want to run your own version, I can highly recommend the independent rust server implementation here: https://github.com/dani-garcia/bitwarden_rs

              Very easy to set up and compatible with the browser extensions, android app etc.

              I have been using this for month running it on a raspberry pi behind a VPN at home (with encrypted offsite backup). Works like a charm

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                Or, you can use @jcs’s rubywarden.

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                  I am trying out bitwarden_rs now and do feel the same usability as the mainstream software. do you have any feedback about rubywarden regarding existing features, usability compared to the main software, and mostly, maintenance tips? thanks!

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                  I run this in a docker container alongside watchtower to keep it up to date. Runs like a champ, I hardly ever have to touch it.

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                    same here. I am not a fan of docker in general, but trying to compile this myself on a raspi tipped me over the edge towards using docker for this.

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                  Such a great project. I’d love to see them get to the point where you don’t need a copy of RCT2 to play.

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                    That would require recreating all of the graphics assets, sounds, etc. Not a trivial task.

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                    I really like tilling window managers and I used to use them exclusively in my younger days, but now I find I don’t have the time or energy to spend fiddling with their configuration and set up. I’d really love it if there were a desktop environment that has all the richness and integration of Gnome/KDE but with forced tilling. I’ve tried various tilling extensions for Gnome and they’re all kludgey and don’t work well, especially with multiple monitors. Sway looks great but I don’t want to have to mess with manually installing and configuring notifications, launchers, menu bars, etc.

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                      I installed sway and used it in its default configuration, except for arranging my monitors, which you have to do in any WM because there’s no way it can know the physical layout of your monitors. I’ve added a couple of keybindings for stuff like taking screenshots, but again, nothing tiling wm-specific there.

                      You can customise it if you want to, but you don’t need to. It works fine out of the box.

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                        there’s no way it can know the physical layout of your monitors

                        I’ve wondered about this; back in the day of CRTs if your system switched off and on your display and used a stereo mic, it could determine which side each display was on. It seems that nowadays modern LCD screens are relatively silent, but I’m also sure my ears aren’t as sensitive as my laptop’s mic.

                        1. 3

                          I’ve wondered about this; back in the day of CRTs if your system switched off and on your display and used a stereo mic, it could determine which side each display was on.

                          Huh. Was this actually a feature that was used in practice?

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                            Nah, just some random idea I came up with. Never heard of it being implemented.

                      2. 2

                        Seconded. I’ve tried Sway and like it, but I wish it were a little more batteries-included. I already have to train my fingers to use splitscreen windowing shortcuts in tmux and vim, dealing with yet another model just isn’t much fun.

                        1. 2

                          I really wish vim were set up so different vim windows could be connected to the same vim ‘server’ like you can do with Emacs. It would mean one less layer of tiling window managers.

                          Even just different ‘client’ sessions with some really strict requirement like ‘always looking at a different tab’ would be fine with me.

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                            I really wish vim were set up so different vim windows could be connected to the same vim ‘server’ like you can do with Emacs. It would mean one less layer of tiling window managers.

                            Neovim intensifies

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                              :) that link is actually the legacy Vim remote interface. But Neovim is indeed working on Emacs-like frame capability, which requires a few different components:

                              1. client-server capability: multiple UIs to connect
                              • Nvim supports this since ~2015, but the same layout is shown on all clients
                              1. “multigrid” feature: logical separation of layouts internally (no, Vim didn’t have this: instead it sprinkles calls carefully across the codebase to build a unstructured cell map)
                              • Nvim 0.4.3+
                              1. “tabgrid” feature: allows connecting to different tabpages from each client, so clients can see different layouts of the same server.

                              By the way, even Emacs does not have Nvim’s decoupled UI architecture. Emacs renders a TUI server-side and sends it to dumb clients. Whereas Nvim sends structured data to clients which then decide how to render it.

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                        The internet archive guys are doing great work that is under-appreciated. If you want to help them out you can run the Archive Team Warrior to help them out. I run two different instances myself.

                        1. 1

                          Oh nice, I never knew that was a thing. I will set one up too!

                          How much traffic do they produce/month?

                          1. 1

                            To be honest I don’t watch it very closely but it’s never generated enough traffic on my network that I explicitly noticed it.

                          2. 1

                            Does The Internet Archive site operate as a client-server site? I mean, do they store everything themselves? Or is it distributed bittorrent style?

                            I think they could use something similar to HBO’s Silicon Valley’s PiperNet, where each node in the network stores encrypted pieces of the information. I believe it’s IPFS that operates similarly?

                            1. 2

                              read the thread, it is all in there

                              1. 1

                                Oops, I bookmarked it to read it later but by the title I didn’t know it answered my questions and so I asked. Sorry :D

                          1. 4

                            As a Linux w/ Bash user the dependency on zsh is a little annoying but I get it. Hope this becomes something mature and stable.

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                              AF_UNIX is supported on Windows now too, and has some advantages over named pipes: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/commandline/af_unix-comes-to-windows/

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                                At the rate things are going, in 2024 Windows is just going to be a UI on top of the Linux kernel…

                                1. 6

                                  You use unix or you spend 30 years reinventingreinventing unix, they say…

                                  1. 2

                                    I’ve speculated about that on lobste.rs before. To summarize a few thousand words of discussion: Windows supports legacy applications primarily via its elaborate kernel. A fully backwards compatible swap is out of the question.

                                    I think the recent-ish Windows Long Term Service Branch/Channel gives Microsoft a path to switch the consumer Windows kernel to Linux, and put the NT kernel into full on maintenance mode. But perhaps developing WSL on NT will always cost less than a full kernel swap? Hard to say.

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                                      I think I’d be okay with that.

                                  1. 3

                                    I wish more people would give Proxmox a chance. It’s a very capable hypervisor based on Debian with a decent web GUI.

                                    1. 4

                                      There are SO many hypervisors out there and everybody’s got a favorite horse in that race.

                                      1. 6

                                        The term ‘hypervisor’ has a very specific, narrow definition. Proxmox isn’t a hypervisor. In fact there are only a few hypervisors.

                                        Wow, the Wikipedia page on hypervisors is somewhat wrong.

                                        Looking at the “Classification” section, I would only call the “bare-metal” software listed there Hypervisors. bhyve and KVM are hypervisors, too, albeit weird fat ones.

                                        Here is an easy to highlight error in this wikipedia page: VirtualBox is not a hypervisor product, full stop. I don’t know when they started calling that kind of software a hypervisor, much less a “type-2”… Is this the result of some marketing strategy?

                                        Hypervisors run on bare metal. That’s part of the definition. VirtualBox is an application. (Albeit one that invokes some exotic CPU instructions…)

                                        1. 3

                                          This reminds me of the OS argument. Linux is not an OS it’s just a kernel. Ubuntu is not an OS either, it’s a distribution.

                                      2. 3

                                        xcp-ng1 is also pretty cool

                                        1. 1

                                          I haven’t tried using Proxmox at all yet, but I definitely want to! The web GUI does look pretty nice.

                                          1. 2

                                            We use it at work, after switching from VMWare. Medium-small company, we use it to manage telephony and networking servers/clusters. The sysadmins seem to love it.

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                                          I’m interested to see what others say on this, but please could commenters distinguish between application containers and system containers in their replies? Application containers are like Docker: no init process, massive paradigm shift in workflow and deployment, bundle everything into a “golden image” in a build step, and so on. System containers are like lxd: pretty much the same workflow as deploying to a VM except that memory and disk space doesn’t need to get partitioned up, though you might use differing deployment techniques and tooling just as you might with non-container deployments.

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                                            I think a lot of people are unaware that system containers exist thanks to the hype and popularity of docker. Having worked with both, I personally prefer the system container paradigm and specifically the LXD ecosystem. Although that’s probably because I’m already comfortable working with VMs and standard Linux servers and there’s less new stuff to learn.

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                                              I wish I had gone more of the lxd system container route. I feel like I could have taken my existing ansible workflow and just applied them to containers instead of KVM virtual machines (via libvirt). I think I started going down that route for a bit, but then just ended up rewriting a lot of services I used to be in regular Docker containers. I ended up writing my own provisioning tool that communicated directly with the Docker API for creating, rebuilding and deploying containers (as well as setting up Vultr VMs or DigitalOcean droplets with Docker and making them accessible over VPNs):

                                              https://github.com/sumdog/bee2

                                              In general I tend to like containers. They let you separate out your dependencies and make it easy to try out applications if project maintainers supply Dockerfiles or official images. But there are also tons of custom made images for things that may not get regular updates, and you can have tons of security issues with all those different base layers floating around on your system. I also hate how it’s so Linux specific, as the FreeBSD docker port is super old and unmaintained. A Docker engine implementation in FreeBSD that uses jails (instead of cgroups) and ZFS under the hood would be pretty awesome (FreeBSD can already run Linux ELF binaries and has most of the system calls mapped, except for a few weird newer things like inotify et. al, which is what the old/dead Docker used).

                                              I have huge issues with most docker orchestration systems. They’re super complex and difficult to setup. For companies they’re fine, but for individuals, you’re wasting a lot of resources on just having master nodes. DC/OS’s web interface is awful and can eat up several MBs of bandwidth in JSON data per second!

                                              I’ve written a post on container orchestration systems and docker in general:

                                              https://penguindreams.org/blog/my-love-hate-relationship-with-docker-and-container-orchestration-systems/

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                                                I don’t user containers and don’t know the difference between docker and lxd any more than what you just described.

                                                It’s not clear to me what application containers provide that per-application-user-ids don’t.

                                                System containers sound like something that may interest me. I build a lot of VMs.

                                              1. 4

                                                I’ve been using this for about a month and installed it on top of vanilla ubuntu 19.04 rather than using the regolith distribution (I’m not sure why it needs to be a new distribution). Long story short, I ended up changing the color scheme, switching from st to kitty, broke the pretty i3 bar with a dist-upgrade, and probably would have been better off just doing all of this myself.

                                                1. 1

                                                  But that kind of makes it interesting for me, as I have no desire to fiddle around on my work machine. But I had to a little when I installed it. (Been using i3 for a while, but I also wanted some DE integration, so having KDE Plasma as well and it’s not 100% perfect).

                                                  So I might give this a shot and live with “only 90% what I love, but at leasti t works in a non wonky way”

                                                  1. 1

                                                    How does the integration with Gnome’s control center look like?

                                                    The best thing about Gnome are all the things working together; the screen lock, the keyboard layouts, the printers, the plug-and-play displays. I prefer using tiling window managers but I invariable end-up re-creating a lot of these things, half baked.

                                                    1. 4

                                                      I really wish the major DEs would add a tiling mode. I really like tilling window managers but I also really like Gnome. I’ve tried a few of the tiling extensions but they all kinda suck and feel kludgey and really don’t like that I have one of my monitors oriented vertically. If Gnome had an option to force windows to tile instead of float I’d be a happy person.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Myself I find that “corner snapping” is all tiling I want in my life, and MATE does that just fine.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          I use XFCE + i3, works pretty well. You can just disable the window manager and start i3 and it works. Not sure if that would work for you (see https://github.com/benoncoffee/archlinuxconfig for the installation, dotfiles, etc.).

                                                        2. 2

                                                          Excellent, actually. Everything works – from screen lock to display. No arandr or half-baked scripts. This is a really redeeming point that I didn’t even think about. The fact that I missed this illustrates how seamless it is. I suppose I also haven’t had to make any scripts for the bar either, which is nice

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                                                        There’s a discord community for the game here: https://discord.gg/PqNvgXx

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Seems like it’s missing a crucial piece… email.