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    The question is, what is the alternative? I see two main funding models:

    Paywalls. You pay with your money.

    Ads. You pay with your attention.

    It’s also possible to fund projects through donations, or as hobbies, but producing most of what there is to read requires more money.

    Has capitalism really progressed so far that we can no longer even conceive of collective funding models? No wonder people put up with privatised prisons, schools and healthcare systems.

    Yes I am suggesting software/news/services could be funded from taxes. Content that is a necessary part of our social infrastructure should be. Content that serves only a luxury/entertainment purpose could be covered by art grants to supplement the models the author listed.

    Increasingly we require certain software and internet services to function in society, we should view this as basic infrastructure.

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      Let us be distinct about funding infrastructure maintenance compared with funding software development or other artistic production. Then, indeed, infrastructure could be maintained through taxes in a non-controversial application of socialist logic. However, the design of that infrastructure will be by committees and incumbent power structures. Similarly, art grants could be extended to software authors, with all of the controversy over ownership and licensing that would result.

      But for infrastructure, there’s at least one additional option, which is perhaps more communist than socialist: the cooperative. The Bittorrent network is a popular example; folks each contribute a small amount of bandwidth and disk space, and create a vast content-distribution network which becomes faster and more available as content keys become hotter.

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        However, the design of that infrastructure will be by committees and incumbent power structures.

        Socialism is all about upsetting the incumbent power structure and putting the people in charge. In recent conceptions this has included nationalising utilities and putting them under the control of a board of stakeholders including service users, workers, and government (Labour party, 2019). There’s also the municipal socialism model where this is devolved to a local level (and quite a few essential services are delivered by municipally owned organisations, some of which are even meaningfully democratic).

        Sure, there will still be committees, but there’s no reason that they have to be more onerous than they are in capitalist organisations. There’s nothing stopping a small group from doing its own thing and then trying to persuade the world to adopt it, indeed, if you don’t need to devote less of your time to wage labour you have more capacity to do such things and if the stakeholders don’t need surveillance capitalism then there should be less of an incentive mismatch.

        Small aside: Lots of socialist parties support the co-operative movement. The Labour party in the UK has been in electoral coalition with the co-operative party for decades.

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          For an implementation that’s a lot closer in spirit to what you describe, see freenet.

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          I’ve noticed a similar phenomenon when discussing English football (soccer) in the aftermath of the attempt to form a breakaway league. (If you aren’t following it, the short version is that some historically profitable clubs tried to start a new league from which they cannot be relegated to guarantee their income, where the “they” in “their” is the owners who treat it as a business rather than the cultural entity it is.)

          Any ideas that in any way restrict the freedom of the owners of these clubs - culture and wider society be damned - are out of the question.

          We are now so deeply within this economic orthodoxy that we can no longer conceive of ideas that don’t neatly fit within it.

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            Has capitalism really progressed so far that we can no longer even conceive of collective funding models? No wonder people put up with privatised prisons, schools and healthcare systems.

            Yes I am suggesting software/news/services could be funded from taxes. Content that is a necessary part of our social infrastructure should be. Content that serves only a luxury/entertainment purpose could be covered by art grants to supplement the models the author listed.

            We could fund things that way, and maybe we should fund things that way. But we aren’t funding things that way, which means that for right now there are only a handful of practical funding models that work, and none of them are good.

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              Paywalls. You pay with your money.

              These are annoying indeed but there are plenty of websites where you pay for content but can freely share a number of articles each month or so with non-subscribers, like LWN or The Correspondent. There are plenty of people paying them. And no ads!

              Ads. You pay with your attention.

              Like others say, this completely bypasses the deeply invasive ways ads on the internet track you. See also this other post showing how Facebook doesn’t even want to expose this to users because they’re too ashamed of it.

              It also ignores the “user experience” of ads, which is often terrible - making your machine slow, hijacking your attention with big boxes that you have to click away etc. I don’t mind a well-designed ad here and there like you used to have in magazines, but the current ad experience is just hellish.

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                It also ignores the “user experience” of ads, which is often terrible - making your machine slow

                Indeed we collectively pay for ads through bandwidth and power consumption. Why is this never factored in?

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                  The Cost of Mobile Ads on 50 News Websites estimated ads are >50% of mobile data usage.

                2. 4

                  Ads. You pay with your attention.

                  Like others say, this completely bypasses the deeply invasive ways ads on the internet track you.

                  It’s not just the tracking. Ads are intentionally manipulative. A lot of the techniques in modern advertising date back to the propaganda techniques from the early 20th century and have been progressively refined. There are benign ads, which try to inform customers and rely on the fact that the product serves a real need and is better than the competition for a specific use, but they’re in the minority. The vast majority are using psychological tricks to try to manipulate people into spending money.

                  If your motivation for working on ads is rooted in the idea that there’s a lot of wealth disparity and so a lot of people who couldn’t afford paywalled content, maybe you shouldn’t work in an industry that’s predicated on finding the most vulnerable people in society and taking money from them?

                3. 3

                  Can you give more detail on how you would have government funding of media without government control of the media? Maybe a dedicated tax, the way the BBC is authorized to collect an annual fee from anyone in the UK who owns a television?

                  Maybe it’s better to have a media landscape beholden to a government which we (in the US) mostly elect than one beholden to a few giant ad companies, but not that much better.

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                    Here are some options:

                    1. Make them financially independent by giving investments or a trust fund rather than recurring grants (this is how The Guardian (partially) funds itself, and how many universities and charities in the USA are funded)
                    2. Encourage individuals to do the funding (this is how lots of public broadcasting in the USA is funded now, especially in the US. Possibly increase minimum wage or issue vouchers to get more funding from poorer people)
                    3. Get a more trustworthy government (Proportional representation, better parties, funding reform, gerrymandering, etc, etc)

                    I’d also argue that the existing corporate media in the USA is beholden to government, or at the very least has a deeply untrustworthy relationship with it. The corporate media are well known for uncritically repeating lies fed to them by intelligence officers (Glenn Greenwald and others have written about this often) and political journalists are dependent on “access” to government ministers and officials for their stories, which requires them to be chummy with the people they are supposedly holding to account.

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                    I once asked an economist doing monetary policy studies for African nations how she thought the world could work without currency (a la Star Trek, or similar) and she legit could not concieve of such a thing, said it was impossible.

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                      Well, she would’ve probably thought of something like the Economic Calculation Problem and decided it wasn’t worth her time to solve…

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                        You have the same failure of imagination. Conceivably, a post-scarcity world where you have a matter replicator at home and you can just walk up to it and say what you want and it gets fabricated for you on the fly would conceivably not need a market, hence its absence in Star Trek TNG for example.

                        It’s ridiculously far-fetched, but it’s just an exercise in imagination. We’re as a society so fixated on current economics and politicization, we can’t even conceive of different systems. Is what we have now the end state? If so, we’ve stopped dreaming and evolving.

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                          I was going to make some joke about fully-automated luxury communism or the like but thought we were talking from within the bounds of possibility.

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                    The arresting thing on this article (I largely disagree with, though understand and appreciate, the author’s argument) is the first comment:

                    Advertising is bad because it’s fundamentally about influencing people to do things they wouldn’t do otherwise

                    The same can be said about schools, parenting, democracy, and having arguments on tech blog discussion threads.

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                      The motivation is what’s relevant.

                      In that sense, as much as they annoy me, religious preachers are less annoying than advertisers.

                      And you’ve touched upon it but it’s even more questionable when applied to democracy/politics. To call that a grey area would be an understatement.

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                        In civilised countries there are at least laws governing standards for adverts. You can’t claim your chocolate bar or miracle drug will cure a disease without proof.

                        Religious preachers have no such limitations.

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                          In the UK, there are a lot of restrictions on where those laws apply. Getting them enforced for anything online is really hard, especially given that the ad may show up only for a small number of people and may be paid for by someone in a different country.

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                            I’m pretty sure warm beer discounts the UK from the “civilised” qualifier anyway :-P

                            1. 1

                              Taste buds stop responding when they get cold. If your beer is so bad that you have to deaden your tastebuds to be able to stomach it, then you might consider trying better beer. The US started chilling beer during prohibition for precisely this reason: it was so bad that you couldn’t drink it at room temperature and had to chill it so that you couldn’t taste it as much.

                              1. 1

                                (a) You couldn’t pay me to drink American ‘beer’.

                                (b) I agree completely with your hypothesis, because as we all know, ice cream is tasteless. /s

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                      Oof visiting https://ema.srid.ca/ in firefox with noscript does not inspire confidence.

                      I’ve looked at a bunch of static site generators and I’m coming around to the point of view that it is a rite of passage to write your own. That way you know the code and can extend it in whichever way you please.

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                        Oof visiting https://ema.srid.ca/ in firefox with noscript does not inspire confidence.

                        This is not Ema’s fault, which doesn’t dictate how you render your HTML or CSS; your site can be as simple as a single index.html containing nothing but <b>Hello</b>.

                        It is just that the website’s code lazily (out of convenience) uses the twind JS shim for applying Tailwind styles by using the helper. I’d like to create a new project that creates type-safe Haskell wrapper for Tailwind, as well as acts as a “compiler” that produces the final CSS asset based on the usage in generated HTML, similar to how windicss’s compiler does it.

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                          My site (https://samhh.com) is currently written in Gatsby, which made sense at the time as I’m most familiar with TypeScript and React. I’ve had a look at rewriting it in Hugo, and it mostly works now locally, but there are almost as many gotchas and questionable design decisions which is disappointing.

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                          It is exactly how much time it takes with Haskell if you are surrounded by other engineers who use it 2, but if an engineer learns Haskell on their own, they usually get stuck.

                          This is how I feel about a ton of things in computing. It’s also why SO is so popular, I think. Very often I “get” everything (to the extent I need to), but I have one specific question, or one error message, that I need resolved before I can feel productive. Or I have built up a personal mental model and I want to run it by someone to make sure it is correct (enough).

                          There’s nothing quite like having access to someone who knows more than you to accelerate learning.

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                            Heads up for anyone trying to learn anything FP-related, I found the FP Slack super useful for this when learning Haskell.

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                              There’s access to the knowledge but there’s also a lot of culture in programming languages that you learn much more quickly by contact. All of the “best practise” cargo cult stuff that you only learn by questions answered by “we usually solve that by…” and “don’t use feature X” and “everybody uses ____ library”

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                              I have tried and failed several times over the years to pick up Haskell. It wasn’t until last year when I started using the Haskell Language Server with VS Code that it all finally clicked! Compared to just using :t in ghci, HLS massively accelerated my ability to tinker with the language. I can hover to see the type (and the specialized type) of anything! Type holes! Instant error messages when something is wrong! I don’t need to constantly :load my modules when making changes! It’s fantastic!

                              The other thing that helped was reading through the page on Haskell denotational semantics.

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                                Yes, HLS is great. Type on mouse-over (or type-at-point in emacs land) & immediate error messages make for a really powerful combination when writing Haskell.

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                                  Sounds like what I had with Emacs, until they decided to break all existing tooling in favour of LSP/HIE…

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                                    HLS adheres to the LSP protocol so you should have no problems getting it set up on Emacs.

                                    It’s at the point now on Neovim that I can just add a single line of configuration to enable interoperation with a new language server.

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                                  honestly stuff like this is one reason why I eventually stopped using linux on my desktop. I wanted new software but I didn’t want to install arch (I know about flatpak/appimage but that didn’t solve everything for me because reasons).

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                                    Curious why you’d rather leave the ecosystem rather than run Arch, Debian Testing, or another distro with focus on freshness?

                                    I mean, do what you like of course. Just curious since you called it out.

                                    1. 3
                                      • arch: don’t want to have to subscribe to a mailing list in case of breaking changes
                                      • debian testing and other distros: not as well supported for me as ubuntu, sure i could download and build source for the stuff I use but I really couldn’t be bothered
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                                        I use and love Arch but it still bugs me that Gentoo (not known for being the easiest of distros to use) gets eselect news read and automated warnings about important changes, and the official Arch answer is still “It broke? You should have checked the website before you updated”.

                                        1. 4

                                          I’m on the announce mail list, but even then, I don’t always check email before upgrading.

                                          Instead, I deal with it when it happens. Having busybox and pacman-static installed, breakage would have to be very bad to not be quickly fixable.

                                          Sure, I used Gentoo unstable for some 15 years before adopting arch as my main system, so my pov might be a little abnormal.

                                          1. 2

                                            But what is the envisioned functionality here? Do you just want something like pacnews to list out arch-announce or are you after something integrated with pacman? The former can be done by the week, but pacman is not really Arch specific and it doesn’t make sense to support something like that upstream.

                                          2. 5

                                            YMMV but I’ve had less breakage with Arch than I’ve had with Ubuntu, macOS, or Windows. I think it’s because the rolling release model prevents issues from clustering into large, hard-to-debug groups as you have with most other distros and OS’.

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                                              arch: don’t want to have to subscribe to a mailing list in case of breaking changes

                                              What’s wrong with following the low-traffic announce mail lists of projects you depend on?

                                              1. 3

                                                What’s wrong with following the low-traffic announce mail lists of projects you depend on?

                                                I’d rather just use my pc without doing that.

                                          3. 1

                                            I’m curious as to what your using how and how does it solve stuff like this for you?

                                            1. 1

                                              I switched back to windows

                                              every app i need only comes in one form, exe’s with manual or automatic updates

                                              also warzone runs on it which is nice/not nice for my productivity

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                                            I’ve made some contributions to projects that don’t yet adhere to the XDG specification, a pet peeve of mine.

                                            I’ve migrated my project bangin to sourcehut, and have become a paid user. I’m doing so principally to limit GitHub’s hegemony but have been pleasantly surprised by a few things including the build system.

                                            I’ve got Element (Matrix client) running locally so that I can potentially contribute to it.

                                            I’ve also got aerc, an email client, running off of a dev build with a few of my own print statements inserted to try and debug an obscure bug that I and someone else have noticed.

                                            I love contributing to open source but I don’t love JavaScript or Go. I’m hoping to find some Haskell projects to contribute towards.

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                                              This reminds me of the long and repetitive text editing tasks that got easier when I had learned vim well enough. I had less resistance to begin. Teammates do tend to view the results or the process as wizardry.

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                                                Great example. In my experience it also reminds me of learning Haskell (or another pure functional lang) in that it’s frustrating at first but if you just stick with it it gets much, much easier and makes a great addition to your skill set. Also similar is the Rust borrow checker, though that is less frustrating.

                                                1. 5

                                                  I can relate to both of these. Another that comes to mind is Linux, and perhaps particularly in terms of how it appears to the casual observer the usage of a TWM and a terminal-centric workflow.

                                                  Oh, and touch typing on a keyboard without printed keys. I learned to type properly last year after two decades of hunt-and-peck typing, and now - paired with the above - my partner often tells me I look like a wizard.

                                                  But it’s just a case of lots and lots and lots of repetition.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Now get yourself some Linear A keycaps and really look like a wizard!

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                                                      I have runes on mine. Which in addition is 40% ortho. It feels exactly the same to use it among people.

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                                                First things first, static typing eliminates the need for things like testing what happens in the case of bad inputs. You can leverage the type system to encode invariants and make certain classes of bugs impossible. Make use of it. Learn to love the compiler.

                                                We unit test whatever can be purely unit tested where there’s value. This is aided by pushing effects and any type unsafeties to the edge of the application. TDD for the sake of it isn’t helpful in my view. This is with Jest, which I don’t love or hate. I’d recommend fast-check for integrating property-based tests, they’re still not very common but they do catch bugs your manual test cases will miss. They can also be documentative in expressing the anticipated properties of your functions.

                                                We don’t bother with component tests or anything like Storybook. I consider this a blind spot; there was talk of a more company-wide approach but that seems to have stalled, so we may revisit it as a team.

                                                We’ve got some integration tests written with react-testing-library. It’s a bit fiddly to write but they provide a high degree of confidence that the page-level components work properly. In an ideal world for me we’d have a more robust effect mocking system (a la the typeclass approach in PureScript), but manual API mocks work fine.

                                                There are some E2E tests incl/ snapshots written by QA as well. Ideally these would be written by frontend devs so there’s less friction but we can’t really justify moving away from what we have now (Java-based).

                                                I personally write tests at the end instead preferring type-driven development. I’d probably be test-driven in a dynamically-typed language.

                                                1. 2

                                                  First things first, static typing eliminates the need for things like testing what happens in the case of bad inputs. You can leverage the type system to encode invariants and make certain classes of bugs impossible. Make use of it. Learn to love the compiler.

                                                  Absolutely agree, but it’s important to keep in mind that Typescript (and I believe several other typed compile to js options) have intentionally allowed areas of unsoundness into their type systems in order to provide js compatibility in various places. That doesn’t invalidate this point, but it does mean you have to understand where there could still be runtime type errors that the language doesn’t prevent, and know when/how to test against them. It isn’t just a case of “I use types, so I don’t need to test.”

                                                  1. 2

                                                    Absolutely.

                                                    In the case of TypeScript, strict everything including newer features like no unchecked indexed access significantly reduces the scope of unsafety in well written code. Encoding errors in Either as opposed to throwing is helpful for ensuring the unhappy path is cared for. Then the largest challenge is socially enforcing care with poorly typed APIs and foreign data.

                                                    It’s doable, but if the team were willing to use a stricter language I’d be all for it.

                                                1. 2

                                                  Between 1998 (when a friend that was doing his MSc with the Haskell team) and 2020 I tried three times to seriously learn Haskell. I failed. I do understand the benefits of knowing about it, but all three efforts depressed me a lot.

                                                  That being said, I am not advising anyone against learning it.

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                                                    i’ve tried and failed 3 times in 3 years, and the 4th time it clicked :)

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                                                      I failed twice before succeeding. It is very normal. For me, https://haskellbook.com did the trick. It is slow and involves a lot of exercises, but it actually made it pretty easy in the end.

                                                      Also, I joined a company with some Haskell devs who helped me stay motivated. I think instead you can just join the FP slack or discord to get help.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Seconding the FP Slack, it’s a really friendly place with a bunch of different communities. The fp-ts author hangs out there for example.

                                                      2. 3

                                                        Come to the #haskell IRC channel and ask questions? I’ve seen many people succeed in learning Haskell that way! It worked for me!

                                                      1. 9

                                                        Not quite what you’re asking for, but Fastmail is an email service that offers the multiple addresses thing as a feature out of the box. foo@myname.example.com goes to the same inbox as myname@example.com. Just required a couple of DNS entries.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            TIL and I have been using fastmail for 5 years.. Thanks for sharing!

                                                          2. 3

                                                            Also Migadu!

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                                                            Honestly, for a general-purpose laptop recommendation, it’s hard to recommend anything but the new ARM MacBooks. […] I just hate the cult of personality around built around a ThinkPad that only exists as a shadow in a cave.

                                                            Do you want to tell him or shall I?

                                                            1. 17

                                                              Tell me about what?

                                                              My recommendations are tempered by things like Mac OS (every OS sucks in its own unique ways), but they’re the fastest laptops you can get, get actual all-day battery life without ceremony, are lightweight, and have good build quality. This is based around actually using one as my everyday laptop - Apple really has made significant improvements. Unless someone has other requirements (i.e pen, x86 virt, etc.), they’re good all-around.

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                                                                The quote is just kind of funny to read since Apple products have been almost synonymous with fanboyism and cultish followings for decades, while the thinkpad crowd has levied that exact same criticism.

                                                                I mean personally I don’t actually disagree with you, I think Apple makes good hardware and “thinkpad people” have gotten just as bad as “apple people” in terms of misguided brand loyalty. It’s just funny because what was quoted feels like very much a role reversal in a very long standing trend.

                                                                1. 27

                                                                  Maybe it’s just my circles but I don’t see Apple fanboyism as much as I see “anti-Apple” fanboyism.

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                                                                    That’s because you hang out on sites like Lobsters.

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      Honestly, the “Apple fanboys” are nowadays mostly one of those things that “everybody knows” despite not really bring true. Sure, you can find the occasional example, but you’re more likely to find a handful of mildly positive comments about Apple and then a hundred-comment subthread shitting on both Apple and “all these fanboys posting in here”. And basically any thread about laptops will have multiple subthreads of people loudly proclaiming and getting upvoted and lots of supportive replies for saying Apple is evil, Apple’s hardware and software are shit, everybody should run out and switch to Thinkpads.

                                                                      Which is just kind of amusing, really.

                                                                  2. 16

                                                                    The quote is just kind of funny to read since Apple products have been almost synonymous with fanboyism and cultish followings for decades

                                                                    Yes, and I think the M1 is a prime example of the hype, further boosted by Apple’s following. The M1 is a very impressive chip. But if you were only reading the orange site and some threads here, it is many generations ahead of the competition, while in reality the gap between recent AMD APUs and the M1 is not very large. And a substantial amount of the efficiency and performance gap would be closed if AMD could actually use 5nm production capacity.

                                                                    From the article:

                                                                    Honestly, for a general-purpose laptop recommendation, it’s hard to recommend anything but the new ARM MacBooks.

                                                                    Let’s take a more balanced view. The M1 Macs are great if you want to run macOS. ThinkPads (and some other models) are great if you want to run Windows or Linux.

                                                                    1. 12

                                                                      Do the competitors run fanless?

                                                                      I’m happy with my desktop so I don’t have a stake in this game, but what would appeal to me about the M1 non-Pro Macbook is the fanless heat dissipation with comparable performance.

                                                                      1. 6

                                                                        I mean are there actually laptops that are running super long like the M1? Even back with the Air for me Macs having reliable long batteries was a huge selling point compared to every other laptop (I know they throttle like crazy to do this, but at least the battery works better than other laptops I have owned) . I think Apple deserves loads of praise for shopping laptops that don’t require you to carry your charger around (for decent time frames relative to competition until maybe super recently)

                                                                        Full disclaimer: despite really wanting an M1’s hardware I’m an Ubuntu user so…

                                                                      2. 5

                                                                        I don’t have any brand loyalty towards thinkpads per se but rather the active community of modifications and upgrades. There are things like the nitropad (from nitrokey) that is preinstalled with HEADs and has some minor modifications or refurbishing as well as many other companies are selling second hand thinkpads in this way, but I think nothing beats xyte.ch (where I got my most recent laptop).

                                                                        The guy is an actual expert and will help you chose the modifications you want (for me I wanted to remove bluetooth, microphone, put an atheros wifi so I can use linux-libre, change the CPU to be more powerful, also the monitor changed to 4k and there were other options also.. like maybe putting an FPGA like fomu in the internal USB of the bluetooth or choices around the hard drives and ports you want) after choosing my mods and sending him 700$ he spent a month doing all my requested changes, flashing libreboot/HEADs and then fedexed it to me with priority.

                                                                        This was my best online shopping experience in my life and I think this kind of stuff will never exist for apple laptops.

                                                                        1. 3

                                                                          Hmm fanboyism. Must fight… urge to explain… why PCs are better than laptops. :-p

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Oh, I know all about the dumb fanboy shit. I’ve at least outlined my reasoning as pragmatic instead of dogmatic, I hope.

                                                                        2. 12

                                                                          I just really like running Linux. Natively, not in a VM. I have a recent P14s running Void Linux with sway/wayland and all the hardware works. I know there’s been some effort to get Linux working on the new M1 chips/hardware, but I know it’s going to be mostly out-of-the-box for modern Dell/Thinkpad/HP laptops.

                                                                          With Microsoft likely jumping ship over to ARM, I’m really hoping Linux doesn’t get completely left behind as a desktop (laptop) OS.

                                                                          1. 7

                                                                            It seems like some people mistake the appreciation of quality Apple hardware for a cult.

                                                                            1. 18

                                                                              It may seem like that, but isn’t. Of the two Macs I currently own, one is in for repair (T2 crashed, now won’t boot at all) and one has been (CPU would detect under voltage and switch off with only one USB device plugged in). Of the ~80 Macs I’ve ever deployed (all since 2004), five have failed within two years and a further three have had user-replaceable parts DOA. This doesn’t seem like a great strike rate.

                                                                              BTW I’ve been lucky and never had any of the recall-issue problems nor a butterfly keyboard failure.

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                While I strongly prefer my Dell Precision (5520), I haven’t really had the same experiences as you.

                                                                                I have a work laptop which is a MacBook and gets a bit toasty - but I use it every day and have not had any issues so far.

                                                                                My own laptop was a 2011 MacBook Pro and it took spilling a glass of wine on it to kill it, prior to that there were no problems. Once I did break the keyboard by trying to clean it and had to get it repaired. Maybe it was getting slow and there was some pitting on the aluminium where my hands laid (since I used it every day for 6 years). It died in 2017.

                                                                                Those are the two MacBooks I owned

                                                                              2. 8

                                                                                There might be some selection bias at work, but I have been following Louis Rossmann’s youtube channel and I absolutely do not associate Apple with good quality.

                                                                                1. 5

                                                                                  Louis Rossman has a vested interest in repairable laptops as he runs a repair shop and Apple is actively hostile to third-party repairs.

                                                                                  Not saying what Apple does is good for the consumer (though it’s often why resale value of their laptops is high)- but I would assume that Louis is the epitome of a biased source.

                                                                                2. 5

                                                                                  I have used MacBooks from 2007-2020. I had two MacBooks with failing memory, one immediately after purchase, one 1-2 months after purchase. I also had a MacBook Air (pre-butterfly) with a failing key. I had a butterfly MacBook Pro with keys that would often get stuck.

                                                                                  The quality of average is very average. I think the number of problems I had with MacBooks is very average for laptops. However, Apple offers really great service (at least here in Western European countries), which made these hardware issues relatively painless to deal with.

                                                                                  1. 5

                                                                                    Apple doesn’t merely make good hardware, it makes Apple hardware, in that its hardware is often different from the mainstream. Butterfly keyboards, for example, or some of their odder mouse designs. it’s possible to appreciate good hardware without thinking Apple’s specific choices are worth buying, even if you concede they’re good implementations of those choices you dislike.

                                                                                1. 10

                                                                                  Haskell.

                                                                                  There are some things it’s extremely good at, but I think it’s worth learning because it’s a very different way of thinking about code than you’re likely used to. The lessons learned will travel with you to other languages.

                                                                                  Most notably, after learning Haskell, I find it maddening that other languages don’t have any notion of enforcing purity outside perhaps variable mutation. It encourages code that’s readable, testable, and composable, and speaking of readability it allows you to take mental shortcuts that mightn’t be obvious if you’ve never worked with this style of code.

                                                                                  Likewise function composition allows you to take some mental shortcuts; when practicing type-driven development, I can picture the data transforming from a to b on either side of the composed function without thinking about what’s going on in there internally. This, alongside the tendency to encode the unhappy path in the type system, is I think what gives many Haskellers that feeling of “if it compiles, it’ll probably work”.

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                                                                                    “temp”, then there’s never any doubt when you rediscover it in future that it can be disposed of.

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                                                                                      Alexis King’s technical writing really impresses me. It allows me to follow along quite far, even as someone for whom this topic is a bit too advanced. I remember the same was true of a Haskell talk she gave which if memory serves was about the innards of GHC.

                                                                                      I particularly appreciate it having started writing technical posts for colleagues and the wider world. It’s deceptively hard to write in a way that’s simultaneously full of useful information but not overwhelming.

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                                                                                        Another impressive (and inspiring) fact about Alexis I learned of today is her experience with Racket:

                                                                                        I work on Racket almost as much as I work with Racket, and I know its state of the art macro system inside and out. I use Racket to build extremely flexible tools that are both easy to extend and easy to understand, and I use its documentation language, Scribble, to write general-purpose technical documentation and specifications.

                                                                                        I maintain too many Racket libraries to list.

                                                                                        https://lexi-lambda.github.io/resume.html

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                                                                                        Two things spring to mind.

                                                                                        The first was a recreation of a game I really liked with a vibrant community but lacking involvement from the developers. I didn’t get very far at all; it turns out to write even “trivial” physics for a video game, you’re expected to know a whole bunch of I’m sure very basic stuff I never learned in my youth. That was frustrating and the first time I realised my lack of a formal education beyond my early teens could be a limiting factor, at least without significant extra effort. It’s not like learning another web technology or language where you can pretty much just pick it up based upon what you already know.

                                                                                        The second, more recent, is my desire to write my own programming language as a learning exercise. I’ve always had an affinity for mathematics which has unintentionally led me to topics like pure functional programming and type theory. Regardless of that, if you’re not familiar with concepts and syntax from certain branches of formal mathematics it’s tremendously hard to break into. I’m currently very slowly working my way through PLFA which introduces programming language theory using Agda. Even here, in this detour, I’m struggling because there’s terminology I have to go and pick up in order to progress. Honestly, this feels like the intellectual equivalent of picking up Minecraft for the first time without a guide. I’m sure given time and perseverance it’s possible without a backing formal education, but it’s rather challenging.

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                                                                                          I’ve not got much to add except that this chimes with my limited experience with both Elm and PureScript with Halogen. I prefer the latter as a language but thinking particularly of Halogen it’s fatiguing as a beginner to mentally parse.

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                                                                                            Seems like a lot more hassle than just using Bitwarden, be it cloud, or self-hosted. especially on mobile. Plus even if not as secure, 2FA in bitwarden is great

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                                                                                              It’s more initial setup, but after that point depending upon your workflow it can be less hassle. In my case I’ve got it hooked up with fzf in my TWM so it’s more efficient than any proprietary UI could ever be. And long term there’s less hassle in using standard, multipurpose, open source tools like gpg and git.

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                                                                                                Oh, I would be totally onboard, but since I use passwords and 2fa on mobile a lot, not having the autofill capabilities on that app the article linked is a bit of a hinderance, along with other niceties. For my usecases, bitwarden is open source enough to satisfy that.

                                                                                                But if I think about it, I can see the benefit in the simplicity of this workflow if you don’t need the features I depend on, or they extra app switching doesn’t bother you.

                                                                                                I tried pass a long time ago, probably around when it first came out and liked it, just mobile was always a sticking point, and syncing everything. I mean thats solved with stuff like Seafile, Nextcloud, dropbox, syncthing, rsync, etc. But it being built into what I am using is just a time saver.

                                                                                                I will also admit hat I am not as privacy-conscious as many are.

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                                                                                                  Hi, Android Password Store maintainer here. The app does support Autofill, and does it rather well (even if I say so myself).

                                                                                                  I assume the author is on a very old Android version which doesn’t have native Autofill capabilities. The mention of overlays probably is about System Alert Windows, which apps used pre-Android 8.0 to present Autofill UIs. The accessibility and clipboard backed implementation that was used before native Autofill is extremely buggy and unsafe, so we’ve opted to completely remove it in our development branch.

                                                                                                  Another possibility is that they accidentally installed our legacy version that hasn’t been updated in a couple years, and was marked as archived on F-Droid but I presume stays accessible even today. Here’s the currently maintained version.

                                                                                                  If neither of them are true /u/rhardih, please email me at aps@msfjarvis.dev with some info about your phone and Android version, and I’d love to sort this out :)

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                                                                                                    Hi, this was totally a blunder on my part. I didn’t see it showing up in the Autofill menu next to LastPass and didn’t really think about it more than that, because I personally didn’t mind having to copy paste a bit.

                                                                                                    I’m guessing it’s disabled by default, because it’s necessary to trigger the “Auto-fill service” system settings page when enabling, in order to choose Password Store as default.

                                                                                                    I’m sorry for the misunderstanding. I’ve updated the post with a correction.

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                                                                                                      Thanks for the prompt correction! We recommend users to enable Autofill from within the app since it allows us to present each currently installed browser’s Autofill support level upfront, so that users can adjust their expectations. This was mostly necessary back when Chromium-based browsers had absolutely terrible Autofill support, but is slightly less useful now that all the patches my co-maintainer has been pushing to Chromium have reached the stable channel with Chrome 89.

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                                                                                                      Oh, cool, thank you for clarifying that and thank you for working on the app. I know it might not be for some, but it definitely solves a need for many, and I respect that and appreciate your efforts on the app.

                                                                                                      I might check it out for work related stuff.

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                                                                                                        Thanks a lot for your kind words :)

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                                                                                                  It isnt. I host my password store on a git directory on my server and just use that to keep it updated on my phone and anything else. I also use rofi so having pass-otp and rofi-pass really makes it great on my desktop for example. The android app also just works with otp codes.

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                                                                                                    I’m also in favour of a more seamless setup and am heading towards Bitwarden setup myself, albeit slowly.

                                                                                                    Recently, I’ve been made aware of a 3rd-party command line client for Bitwarden - rbw - it lacks some basic functionality, i.e. one can only edit the pass{word,phrase}, but it’s quite usable otherwise.