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    I love Sublime Text so much. For me though, the killer app that VS code has right now is remote ssh sessions that load up a vscode server on a command-line only remote server and let me use it as though I was working natively on my code base. It might not be a situation many find themselves in, but it’s one that makes my life so simple.

    If Sublime had a plugin to do the same thing with the se level of integration I’d go back in a heartbeat and never leave.

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        Those are unfortunately nowhere near equivalent. The way VSC is set up, the tooling runs on the remote session as well, which means things like autocomplete, debugging, Git history, project-wide go-to-symbol/find usages, etc., are all doable efficiently and cleanly. It’s honestly closer to running an IDE via X on a remote system than anything else, except that the actual UI is running locally, and so has the efficiency and integration with the local desktop that remote X cannot provide. sshfs just gets you the vanilla text editing.

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        Last I saw, it had an rmate-compatible plugin that let you use rmate to open remote files. I use TextMate with rmate and it’s almost seamless. It’s not perfect, but it’s good enough that it lets me use TextMate as my primary editor.

        (TextMate is great, though I would like to write something with a bit fewer features. I like my text editors to edit text and not much else. If I ever start working on sam again, I’m going to remove the two-process mechanism and just have it use rmate.)

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        @Rubenerd have you received the new chip yet? I’m looking forward to seeing a functional 80 column mode, as I didn’t even know it was a thing!

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          Hi, and thanks for the invite :). Not yet, it came from Germany so might be another week or so. I’m super keen to try it out. Screenshots show Desterm128 really pops with all that screen real estate!

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            I’m looking forward to seeing a functional 80 column mode, as I didn’t even know it was a thing!

            But it is one of the primary features of the 128 (!).

            80 columns is a big deal for productivity.

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              I used to have a 128 as a kid and while I’d booted into the green 128 mode, I don’t remember the 80 column mode except as maybe a hazy memory of the unit doing something extra weird.

              Maybe if my dad had been aware it existed he might have used it instead of upgrading to an IBM clone, and I might not have had access to it for games, so swings and roundabouts.

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            I wonder if this could improve Red Dead Online load times too, if there’s code overlap between the two games? Would love for some rando to drastically improve this for soany users.

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              My favorite aspect (mentioned in the article) is that files that use this (logs, whatever) automatically sort sensibly!

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                Only until we get to year 10000. :-(

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                  I vote that when that happens, we change the first digit of the year to hexadecimal so we can put off figuring out a real fix until the year 16000.

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                    At that point we switch to ISO 08601

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                      The Long Now Foundation hasn’t tried to update the ISO standard (that I’m aware of), but they’ve been using 5 digit years for a while now.

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                        There’s already a solution for that: RFC2550

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                      Sublime Text is so nice to use compared to VSCode, (although that’s getting better). The thing that made me give it up however was that almost every plugin developer jumped ship to VSCode and the plugin ecosystem seemed to stall. I’m guilty of jumping ship, primarily for the Remote-X extensions but if I could get something as feature rich in Sublime I’d jump right back.

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                        My website is built with Hugo, and uses a modified theme I liked that needed to have a few changes made for security and speed.

                        Issues I’m aware of: images are large and unoptimised, long articles could probably be truncated on the front page on mobile, content is old.

                        the.geekorium.com.au

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                          “The root cause is a lack of thinking.” We would all like to appear pro-thinking.

                          I’d suggest the root cause are time constraints.

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                            A lot of the reason I’m checking Stack Overflow is (1) the docs for tool/framework/library X are horrible (2) this is the umpteeth tool/framework/library/build system/command line tool to do thing Y I’ve used and can no longer keep everything I need in my head.

                            1. 2

                              I would like very much to join the “We would all like to appear pro-thinking” party! Or can we get that added to some group’s platform?

                              Limiting our sophistry to at least appear in favor of thinking is something we should all be able to get behind.

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                                We’ll have buttons that say “I’ve thought about it!”

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                                  I don’t know… I’d at least like to wait until my preferred political party or favourite celebrity endorses this “pro-thinking”. I don’t want to go chasing fads.

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                                    That could be another party slogan! “I don’t know…. I don’t want to go chasing fads”.

                                2. 2

                                  and time constraints come from need for profit. The market economy is incompatible with good code.

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                                    That’s ridiculous. Time constraints can come from anywhere and trying to use it as a dig against market economies is tenuous, at best.

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                                      Then it might be by chance that the software world is in a terrible state and the more money-constrained enterprises produce the worst software.

                                      Anyway could you tell me where time constraints would come from in the current production mode?

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                                        A limited lifespan in which to do what we must do.

                                        Many of us are keenly aware of our impending end of file.

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                                          It’s not obvious to me that more money constrained enterprises do in fact produce worse software in general; or even that software can be ranked on a single good-to-bad axis irrespective of the goals of the developers and users of that software. I don’t see the amount of money an organization has as being particularly related to how good their software is, or even see that as a particularly relevant question, given that an instition might want to use their money to produce software that does what they think is good rather than what I think is good.

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                                        I generally have a lot more time to spend on code I’ve written while employed than code I’ve written in my spare time.

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                                          that probably means your company has no pressing need to deliver new and unfinished software and it’s healthy enough not to pressure lower layers in the hierarchy into working crazily even if unnecessary.

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                                            My personal experience is that time constraints are rarely the reason for bad software; rather, a number of organisational and/or historical reasons are. Writing bad or good software usually takes about the same time Actually, writing good software is usually faster if you take the long-term view, and I think most people understand that.

                                            The “write once, never look back” coding CEO, that kinda clueless coworker who doesn’t quite seem to know what they’re doing, that asshole coworker who absolutely insists on rewriting everything in their preferred way as that’s the One True Way, that other team in the other city which was recently hired and doesn’t understand the context, changing requirements or directions from management, the customer, or legislation, unclear requirements, a generally toxic work environment which leaves everyone demoralized, someone deciding we should follow latest fad X. Stuff like that tends to be a far larger influence in my experience.

                                            Of course, I’ve only worked in five companies, so it may be different in other companies. But this is my experience based on those five companies.

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                                              Or you could accept the market forces at that place converge on “do it better.”

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                                            Which explains why all the good software comes from north korea, the soviet union and pre-reform china…

                                            1. 1

                                              no but a lot of good software comes from research centers, foundations, public institutions, where the priority is on quality, reliability, correctness, fairness and developers are free to work without being directly exposed to a market-driven feedback loop. That doesn’t mean that these institutions are not immersed in a market economy, but that they invest resources in shielding some people from these pressures in order to be able to produce a kind of quality that is not possible otherwise.

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                                                And these research centers, foundations, public institutions are of course located in societies with free(-ish) markets.

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                                                  yeah but they can produce that software despite the market, not thanks to the market. The way they get funding and allocate resources is in response and opposition to the market needs.

                                                  Peer 2 Peer production is also done in societies with free markets, but they work really hard to try to escape it. It’s a bug, not a feature.

                                          3. 1

                                            Even when I don’t have a time constraint set by some sort of external party, I still get stuck in the trap of searching Stack Overflow and becoming more and more frustrated (although this usually happens with infrastructure and deployment problems, not actual programming issues).