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    How is a new board announcement, spam in the hardware section?

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      When it’s a press release.

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        It has the specs of the hardware

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      One technique I find helpful is to set a timer for 25 minutes and say to myself, “Okay, I’ll give 100% effort, focus, and attention until the timer goes off” (and then actually give my full attention for the entire time). Then I spend 5 minutes doing ‘distracted things’, trying not to think about the work. Repeat.

      I also think that The Mind Illuminated (a book about meditation) is mainly a handbook for improving directed attention (you have to practise a lot, though).

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        One technique I find helpful is to set a timer for 25 minutes and say to myself, “Okay, I’ll give 100% effort, focus, and attention until the timer goes off” (and then actually give my full attention for the entire time). Then I spend 5 minutes doing ‘distracted things’, trying not to think about the work. Repeat.

        I’ve started doing something like this recently. So far so good.

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        Have you heard the good word about pkgsrc?

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          I don’t seem to see Windows mentioned as supported on the linked page, while I it’s listed as an explicit need by the OP?

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            oops, missed the negation.

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              They do support windows via cygwin. Not ideal, definitely. Also I’m sure it works under WSL(but have never tried it).

              Also, it comes ready to go with 22.5k packages, and can handle env oriented(as it does on macOS) or OS oriented(as it does on NetBSD and friends) installations..

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            Truely, one of the greatest storytellers :D Thank you for posting this talk!

            For people who would like to experience some of the style of storytelling in form different than lecture I strongly recommend reading book about Richard Feynman’s life - “Surely You’re Joking Mr. Feynman!”

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              :D It’s on my to read pile, just haven’t got to it yet

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              It’s a bank holiday weekend in England, which means Monday is off too. Hoping to finish Clojure for the Brave and True (I’ve reached chapter 10 without doing the exercises yet), work on pkgsrc for a bit, roam around London and try to visit the carnival.

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                Is there a reason you can’t use Cygwin? I use it for developing on Windows. The terminal is fine, and you can even build standalone windows applications without any Cygwin dependency.

                Edit: Referring to the mintty terminal and the mingw64-i686-gcc-core package.

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                  It’s slow though, especially for CPU intensive tasks

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                    Came here to ask basically this. I do some Windows development occasionally and just use MSYS2 or whatever with mingw64. Yes it is not fast, but it is usable. I also occasionally just use good old cmd.exe with a Makefile since that is how I started and it’s not like you can’t do that anymore… How does the poster think we wrote software in Windows 95/98 days??

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                      Mainly I am concerned about input lag–which was quite high when running gnome-terminal from wsl through vcxsrv–although, it may be better with cygwin since that’s running as a native app–except, maybe not: siblings suggest it’s slow.

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                      This is a shorter version of Simple Made Easy

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                        On the second to last chapter of The Dream Machine, I loved what I’ve read in the book so far.
                        Dropped the Getting Clojure book and switched to Clojure for the Brave and True because I saw many recommendations for the latter and found the formula for the former lacking conceptual teaching, just heres a function, here’s how to use it, how not to use it, summary. I’m currently fighting to get emacs to get cider setup in chapter two of Clojure for the Brave and True - M-x cider-jack-in is no longer available as an option for some reason (it stopped showing up without any system change)

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                          Lots of noteworthy updates to look forward to. Is it just me or does NetBSD development seem to be accelerating of late?

                          I’m also excited by the possibility of the ZFS implementation being in a usable state again. More OSes with ZFS built-in is only a good thing in my mind.

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                            there’s more details of exact changes here

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                            Weather has gone from one extreme to the other, so a bit of reading (The Dream Machine and Getting Clojure) and bit of writing. Currently seeing how far I can get with building packages using pkgsrc using GCC 5 on Mac OS X Tiger with the stock, ancient, linker and tools. Was planning to be outdoors this weekend if it wasn’t for the rain.

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                              Oh dear. “Should you use open source crypto [libraries].” (hopefully unnecessary: YES)

                              Open Source Hardware users is the target audience, so I get that this isn’t like crypto research presentations, but this topic list feels far behind the current conversations occurring in these spaces..

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                                Videos are up , judge for yourself :)

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                                  Thank you!

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                                Looking forward to reading both books (this and 2nd ed of systems performance)

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                                  Nice article!

                                  I still use my G4 Mac Mini today, on a daily basis. I mostly use it as an sshd, web, and git hosting server. I do software development on it as well.

                                  Like the article, the DVD drive went out or doesn’t boot home-burned CD-R discs on my machine. I used to run OpenBSD/macppc but the system compiler (gcc 4.2.1?) did not support C++11. NetBSD had a newer compiler but did not support booting from a USB flash drive and NFS booting seems pretty complicated. I finally gave up and just installed Debian Jessie (which does offer USB bootable media for their powerpc port) and got a C++11 compiler. Debian Jessie is the last stable version to support powerpc and has approximately 1 year of life. Since end of life only goes until June 2020 I have been looking for alternatives.

                                  A couple of weeks ago I made the jump to Debian Sid using the notes here: http://powerpcliberation.blogspot.com/2018/07/debian-ppc-status-update.html

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                                    The OpenBSD system compiler is now clang where it’s supported, and where it isn’t, GCc will never advance beyond 4.2.1 due to licensing. It’s standard procedure to install GCC via ports, which is made available as egcc.

                                    On platforms without Clang, installing new ports on OpenBSD with GCC is like a three-stage rocket. The base system builds a compiler based on the last non-GPLv3 gcc compiler, which builds egcc (which is 4.9.x, but might have recently moved to 8.x), which is then used to compile modern software.

                                    In short, OpenBSD (and BSD in general) is working to remove GCC completely where possible, as they consider it unusable, and will never include any GCC compiler code newer than 4.2.1 due to the license change.

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                                      I have a diskless fw800 g4 powerbook which I boot from a usb flashdrive, NetBSD is happy to boot from it. Only thing is that it doesn’t automatically enumerate the root disk being on usb so you get asked what the root disk is (sd0 if you haven’t got any other usb disks connected).

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                                      Audio quality is pretty bad :-/

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                                        I had the volume cranked up. Will ask if the audio can be edited.

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                                        That’s really really cool.

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                                          The personal side of the story interspersed throughout the slides was…fairly touching, actually.

                                          1. Fresh out of hosptital, Maurice arrives at Rambazamba Thea[t]re in a wheelchair
                                          2. At the time, Maurice could not speak
                                          3. Maurice was convinced he could not act
                                          4. The director put Maurice on the floor and said “act!”.
                                          5. Maurice screamed
                                          6. Maurice got the part
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                                            I enjoyed that as well.

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                                            You have actual vax hardware? How cool! Do you know the power usage?

                                            Would a Gopher client work faster? Since it’s a simpler protocol without encryption?

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                                              Small VAXen are fairly low on power - I don’t have the figures but a VAXstation 4000/90 only has a 174W PSU.

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                                                I do not. Follow the link, It’s a talk someone presented at BSDCan.

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                                                This makes me think of an alternate reality where Japan has a significant chip designer like Intel or AMD. Does anyone know why Japan didn’t end up with a company like this? I do know Sony developed the PS3 chip, but it was in partnership with IBM.

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                                                  The various Renesas chipsets (SH4, etc) are in tons of embedded systems. You probably have a couple in your car.

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                                                    They also powered all later Sega consoles (specifically, the 32X, Dreamcast, and Saturn). They’re really nice chips, and also now have open-source clones that I’ve heard positive things about.

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                                                    There actually were several, but they focused more on the microcontroller and embedded markets and not the high-end.

                                                    NEC was making 8088 clones, which they followed with a 32-bit architecture. They even launched the PC Engine to compete with Nintendo (successfully in Japan, but flopped when brought to the US as the TurboGrafx-16)

                                                    Hitachi was a second-source manufacturer of the 68000 and others for a long time. They had the H8 family, and as barbeque mentioned, the SuperH family.

                                                    It should be noted that Renesas owns most of this now.

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                                                      does Softbank acquiring ARM count?

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                                                      The authors also point out that ISAs can die and Alpha is a great example of an ISA being pretty obsolete outside of owning an old DEC computer, other than the last implementation by HP in 2004 when the IP changed hands again.

                                                      See the Sunway TaihuLight & BlueLight, the Alpha is still alive in China.

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                                                        “Bicycle for the mind” was not a promise. It was a marketing phrase to sell computers.

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                                                              Hah, nice.

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                                                              It is none the less an evocative metaphor, and not entirely bullshit either: early personal computers were much more like bicycles. Bicycles require your participation: you can’t just sit there, you have to pedal. Once you have obtained one, you don’t need to keep buying fuel, just occasional lubricant. Bicycle components are largely standardized and “user-serviceable” with a handful of standard tools. I have put many good bikes together from quality used parts scrounged from local shops. It’s fairly easy to learn how to build and maintain bicycles, especially relative to automobiles. If you’re attentive, the machine itself will teach you.

                                                              But, bicycles are a relatively mature technology that has evolved through the 19th and 20th centuries. For example, the now stereotypical diamond frame was originally called the “safety” bicycle, as it didn’t pitch the rider headfirst as easily as the “ordinary” high-wheelers. And when thinking of bicycles as urban infrastructure, especially in the US, one must face the history of political influence and propaganda wielded by the automobile (and petroleum) industry.

                                                              I think that there are more interesting parallels between transportation and computing than will fit in a blog post, let alone a Lobsters comment.