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    That’s not modern in my opinion, because we’ve been doing it for at least a couple of years.

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      Agreed. “Modern” web development IMO would talk about Gulp, bower, React, etc. Also the submitted link looks too much like linkspam to me.

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        I would argue that in a couple years, we will still consider HTML5 and CSS3 to be modern, and people will be saying “Oh yeah, React, I remember that.”

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          HTML is now essentially a living standard, which means that whatever the living standard says will be modern. As for CSS, a similar thing has happened and it has been split into modules such as “css-selectors” and “css-flexbox” allowing them to “level up” individually. HTML5 and CSS3 may still refer to the then-current version at any point in the near future but the content will have changed significantly.

          To be honest I’m not sure what you’re arguing for since we aren’t talking about what will be modern but rather what is modern.

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      To be honest, this doesn’t seem good to me, nor bad. Most people get into something in which they can simply learn and use it. Briefly, they switch from Python or Node.js to Go because they are familiar with the syntax (Go solves some problems, though).

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        Actually, the reason I didn’t switch to Go immediately were all the syntax gotchas (you think it would be written in a way and instead it’s some other way). I personally switched to Go both because of the performance and memory usage improvement (going from over 40MB for a simple node web app to just 3MB) and because managing microthreads with channels is just way more intuitive than using async.

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          It sounds like you are not kinda those people. I personally just don’t like Go, because of the paradigm, lack of things I’m interested in, etc. The only reason that might interest me to give Go a shot is performance. But in most situations I need to get things done in parallel right, in which I found Erlang a good fit. However, I won’t use Go if I need performance. In fact, for me, there’s no reason that could motivate me to use Go in production.

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        It’s amazing. Moreover, it can also be used as yet another good example for learning Sed.

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          Not bad as a briefly explained article with code example. But I would suggest having a look at W3C’s documentation of CORS.

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            The only difficulty with the W3C documentation is that it’s written for implementers, not developers, and so it’s not the friendliest read. Nonetheless, it is the canonical source.

            Here is the link to the CORS documentation, for anyone interested.

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            I’m working on leptus (my erlang REST framework) to implement a flexible logging system. The highest priority is providing a pluggable access log.