Threads for sproketboy

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    They don’t mention Spring for web frameworks. FAIL.

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      They do. It’s on the second page of frameworks/libs.

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        Didn’t Gates once say that / was the stupidest idea after the other stupid idea of using \ for folder paths?

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          Stupid in what way?

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              You are generally unkind and this kind of behavior is not welcome, appreciated, invited or tolerated on this site.

              Take the sass elsewhere.

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            I always smile when I read about the table tag. The reality was it was great for consistent layouts for a long time as CSS was broken in various ways. If they had called the table tag grid and had another one called “layout” I think we would not have had the same history with CSS.

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              Tables are a PITA to style well. It’s fine as long as you can guarantee a screen size, but as soon as you need to have any flexibility at all, it falls over. I’ve had lot of situations where the data I need to style is basically tabular (a list of election candidates, for example), and it’s a headache trying to make it work on a phone. It’s easier to use plain old blocks and fake a table than vice versa. And that’s ignoring flex and grid, which are great.

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                I’m older than you and I’m talking about the pre-phone days. 90’s through around 2010.

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                  I made my first website in 1997. :-)

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                What? Tables were a huge source of many of the quirks that make quirks mode - tables were exceedingly broken, just like CSS you had to be very careful what you used, and how you used it, or things would just break. Pixel precise layout with tables required immense effort, and was only used because of how bad the rest of IE’s layout engine was.

                If you’re always smiling I question how much time you actually spent trying to get table layout to match between browsers.

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                  “Pixel precise” is normally a phrase that indicates doing something horribly wrong. Pixels are not real

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                    Blame the site designers, they’re the ones making layouts based on absolute pixel positions

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                      I blame the hiring managers who insist on hiring print designers for web work and the product managers who pretend the print designers should have final say on all design issues. The designers themselves are doing the best they can with a toxic situation.

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                    If you were trying pixel precise layouts with tables you were doing something wrong. Tables were useful for dynamic flow layouts. I’m sorry you tortured yourself for years. Perhaps you should find another profession.

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                      No, I spent most of my time ensuring other - very large - sites worked correctly in WebKit, where I did a moderate amount of the layout and rendering logic over the years.

                      People expected to be able to do pixel layout in browsers, and so people were able to approximate pixel layout in browsers.

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                  Working on Persism which is a low ceremony ORM for Java. Working on a couple of caching improvements and I want to try to get Docker and VirtualBox to play nice.

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                    Man those screens were tiny.

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                      Reminds me of dev I would code review with. It was a large Java project where he would continuously put try/catch around everything making his code hard to follow. I told him “do or not do, there is no try”. Meaning just throw the damn exception if you’re not doing anything about it!

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                        I remember when “hypertext” was the industry’s “cryptocurrency” or “machine learning” - everyone created a hypertext system and things that weren’t hypertext were called hypertext to get people to buy them.

                        On the Amiga there were three hypertext systems that really stood out to me:

                        • Helm, which was my favorite. Very much like HyperCard, but with a very Amiga feel to it and worse scripting. There was a version on some coverdisk (Amiga Format, probably) that I got and used extensively and then eventually I got a full copy.
                        • AmigaGuide, the standard help system on AmigaOS 3.x. It was fine. It didn’t support in-line images, but could linke to ay file for which an AmigaOS Datatype was installed and could do fun stuff with ARexx.
                        • Thinker, which was a “professional” hypertext system for the Amiga and sadly seems to have very little documentation floating around for it these days. I remember it being quite good.

                        At any rate, I remember the “hypertext boom” of the late 80’s and early 90’s, at least from an Amiga perspective. It seemed like everyone was jumping on the bandwagon.

                        (There was also a “hypertext novel” called Maelstrom, I believe, that was written in HyperCard and was featured in some art magazines that I still remember reading about and being fascinated by.)

                        EDIT: I found a review of Thinker in Amiga Shopper. It was apparently not as great as I remember it being but what do they know. :)

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                          Here’s an article on the Maelstrom

                          https://archive.is/Itp2w

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                          OMG Windows 2000 was the best version. It took XP time to drag this version from me. Then it mostly went downhill.

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                            Do line feeds work finally?

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                              I posted this on reddit and surprisingly I wasn’t downvoted. ;)

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                                I just launched my first big side-project: https://forlater.email — an email-based bookmarking service! Going to add some more features for it over the weekend, and write up a quick blog post on the technical details behind it.

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                                  Congrats

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                                    Looks pretty cool!

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                                    Well this will work only temporarily.

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                                      I still have those David Ahl books. ;)

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                                        Working on my library https://github.com/sproket/Persism

                                        I found a couple of good bugs today and added a bunch of TODOS. ;)

                                        The bugs relate to the newer 2.0 API

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                                          Oh, nice! I’ve been looking for a JVM-equivalent to Dapper; this seems to fit the bill extremely well. I’ll give it a shot literally today for some stuff I’m working on.

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                                            Thanks! Let me know what you think.

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                                            Looks interesting. It is always good to have lightweight choices to the heavyweight frameworks like hibernate.

                                            I find jdbi.org worth a look too.

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                                              Thanks. Yeah jdbi is useful.

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                                              Why are we still trying to do this? Like, this time it’s going to work out? Forgetting the facts of the fundamental mis-match, the bad habits of conflating relationships between objects (and tables) as ownership/properties, and partially-hydrated objects that lie about their types, everybody’s schema (and migration strategy) is a unique snowflake and one size most definitely never fits all.

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                                                Persism aims to be a low friction alternative to the more complex/larger ORMs that exist like JPA/hibernate etc… It’s a small jar with zero dependencies best used for utils or games. (Though I use it for “real” apps too).

                                                Persism will throw an exception if you have an object not completely initialized (if you select less columns that your POJO has properties).

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                                                I balked at using an ORM for many years. I think my first attempts were with NHibernate and then Django. Having to effectively write the schema twice – once in migrations and once in record types – always felt like lost productivity. I already had integration tests that flex the schema enough to feel confident, regardless of any ORM use. When I started using Rails I finally started appreciating the ORM. I ended up with fewer bugs because my focus had to remain on the application code being compatible with the actual schema (instead of my record types, which could be lying to me). Seeing the same schema-as-truth approach in a java ORM is pretty exciting for me.

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                                                  Thanks.