1. 1

    BigV allows for custom ISO mounting and installation but I haven’t tried them.

    There’s also TransIP but I don’t recommend them. Storage is not local and the support staff leaves a lot to be desired. Otherwise, runs and works OK.

    1. 3

      Mythic Beasts https://www.mythic-beasts.com/

      I’m waiting for the 5.6 iso to upgrade my VPS from 5.5 - I’ve been really happy with the service.

      1. 2

        Nice service, used them. Their Lite offering runs on Mac Minis, which in their setup had terrible IO. After reporting it to them, they flipped some knobs in QEMU and now it runs OK-ish so the issue should be fixed for new signups.

        Their standard offerings are unaffected.

        Very clueful staff, real VNC access, custom ISO installation etc.

        1. 1

          There engineers are Unix engineers - and actually understand what they are doing Which is why I ended up using them :~)

      1. 16

        I have been using FreeBSD on Vultr for quite some months now. Prices are nice, it’s like DigitalOcean but slightly cheaper, better CPU and their gigabit internet is faster (plus they have IPv6 on more locations).

        While FreeBSD is one of the available autoinstall choices they have a way to upload your own ISO on the server and install the OS yourself via a webbased VNC thing.

        Someone used it for OpenBSD and made a guide.

        1. 8

          Wow, logged in just to thank you.

          Just tried them and migrated my little OpenBSD VPS from Mythic Beasts to Vultr.

          Custom ISO loading, OpenBSD works flawlessly, speed (both SSD disk IO and network) is amazing (especially for an OpenBSD running virtualized), no issues whatsoever.

          I remember trying them when they started and it all seemed like an amateur operation but right now, it’s just too good of a deal not to use it, for such a low price. As it stands now, I don’t have a single complaint and I only wish it stays that way.

          1. 2

            I signed up for Vultr last week, after their ad showed up in my Twitter stream for the n-teenth time. Prices are great, especially considering you get a decent amount resources (that don’t seem to be horribly oversold).

            Their API also looks sensible, though I haven’t tried it yet.

          1. 7

            Calling something “standard” maketh not a standard. Designing something to fit in well with a unixy ecosystem is nice and all, but until it’s in POSIX/SUS, standard it ain’t. (It’s also not established enough to be considered a de facto standard either.)

            1. 2

              Not to mention it requires bash instead of being posix shell compliant. Standard Unix indeed. To top it off, GnuPG.

              On a related note, why store passwords at all? Generate them on the fly and write your own implementation:

              http://sramov.nfshost.com/p.c

              http://sramov.nfshost.com/p.go

              http://sramov.nfshost.com/p.pl

            1. 1

              Finally something reasonable!

              Are there plans to push this into base along with libsodium? Or just as a port/package?

              1. 1

                It’s just something I wanted to do. There was a kind of pressure to make signify into more than it is; now it doesn’t need to be.

                1. 2

                  If you put up a release archive somewhere I’ll make a port for it.

              1. 2

                Wow, haven’t really anticipated the entry would hold up for so long on the front page over at HN: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=6654179

                Nice comments, too. Honestly, I wouldn’t like for OpenBSD to become too popular :)

                1. 1

                  That discussion certainly highlights some of the frustrations I have with both the software and the community. It’s almost 2014, can we really not have bzip2 in base yet?

                  1. 2

                    The perl bzip2 module is installed by default. :)

                1. 2

                  Packets already flowing through 5.4 –release on my ‘lil ALIX home router. Workstation on –current, of course.

                  There is nothing quite like OpenBSD out there. Thank you OpenBSD developers!

                    1. -1

                      All aboard the failboat!

                      I am sorry, but couldn’t resist.

                      1. 1

                        hey buddy, 1997 called, that ship already sailed: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Yorktown_(CG-48)

                        1. 0

                          I was alluding to ship being ‘powered by Linux’. Bloating on huge pile of extra crap on top of the existing Linux mess.

                      1. 9

                        I have a hard time taking performance advice from someone whose website takes 3 seconds to load while showing me a fancy spinning progress indicator instead of just showing me content.

                        1. 2

                          Your concerns are completely understandable, the blog is indeed in desperate need of some face-lifting, I’m prioritizing other things at the time, though.

                          1. 1

                            Not to mention (ab)using radio buttons for such purpose.

                          1. 1

                            Thanks for this!

                            Only works when I invoke it manually, when put in .xinitrc it does get started normally, but no mouse hiding. Here’s the full .xinitrc:

                            setxkbmap -option ctrl:nocaps
                            xbanish &
                            xrdb -quiet -load $HOME/.Xresources
                            xset fp+ $HOME/.fonts && xset fp rehash
                            xsetroot -cursor_name left_ptr -solid black && bgs -c /home/sramov/pic/5583922156_87619bb8a1.jpg
                            
                            ssh-agent xmonad
                            
                            1. 1

                              Ok, file a bug on the Github repo with some debugging info and I’ll look into it.

                              1. 1

                                Works beautifully when started manually, but when invoked from .xinitrc (on OpenBSD -current with dwm -current) I can reproduce sramovs findings – the cursor does not hide, but the process is running.

                                When started with debug from .xinitrc no debug seems to be produced (?). Debug output is produced when started manually though. Still want a github bug issue opened?

                                1. 1

                                  Can you and @sramov try the latest git code? It’s working for me in an xsession with ratpoison.

                                  1. 1

                                    Still the same when started form xinitrc, but it might be related to some window focus thing in dwm:

                                    When invoked manually with dwm running I see the cursor hiding on creating a new window only if the cursor is not in the new window area; debuging reports ‘creating new window, snooping on it’ and nothing further when I type in this window. If the cursor is not within the area of a newly created xterm I see ‘creating new window, snooping on it’ and then ‘keystroke 50 hiding cursor’ and any new keystroke is reported.

                                    So it seem the keystrokes are not captured from those windows created with a cursor “above”. But if I move the window focus between a few windows and return to new window – then the cursor is correctly hidden when typing and debug reports any keystroke. Want a github issue opened on this peculiar thing?

                                    1. 1

                                      Just for the record: The above problem is solved with this commit https://github.com/jcs/xbanish/commit/5056afe970aa3c1dfb6af5f879ea649a8af90b15. Thanks!

                                      1. 1

                                        Nope, still nothing, after trying the latest git head. I’ve tried with all window mangers I use, cwm, xmonad, mcwm etc… The result is always the same. If I put xbanish & in ~/.xinitrc it just doesn’t work. OpenBSD -stable, various OpenBSD -current snapshots, no cigar…

                                        I don’t use GitHub, so instead of filing an issue, I am posting here.

                                        1. 1

                                          Works here: xbanish-1.1 from packages started from xinitrc, dwm via git, latest OpenBSD -current snapshot.

                                          1. 1
                                            uname -a
                                            OpenBSD ouroboros.ramov.inet 5.4 GENERIC.MP#61 amd64
                                            
                                            pkg_info -qm | grep xbanish
                                            xbanish-1.1
                                            
                                            cat ~/.xinitrc
                                            bgs -c $HOME/bgs/fbdtlbl1305772307_crop.jpg
                                            setxkbmap -option ctrl:nocaps
                                            xbanish &
                                            xrdb -load $HOME/.Xresources
                                            xset fp+ $HOME/.fonts && xset fp rehash
                                            xsetroot -cursor_name left_ptr
                                            
                                            ssh-agent xmonad
                                            

                                            I also tried replacing ssh-agent with exec thinking it might have something to do with that, but the result is the same, I just can’t get it to work.

                                            Doesn’t matter which window manager I try, xmonad, cwm, dwm… Also tried xinit and startx

                                            When I manually start it with -d flag, it seems it only hides the cursor when in xterm. When I switch focus to xombrero for instance, I get no output, even the mouse moves are not reported. Same thing when the cursor is on the root window.

                                            Also tried to comment everything in ~/.xinitrc, except for the xbanish & and exec xmonad lines…

                                            Would love to get to the bottom of this!

                            1. 2

                              I don’t want to sound negative but good luck with that.

                              You can’t persuade people, they need to enlighten on their own.

                              1. 1

                                A new version has just been released recently with new sizes and other changes.

                                Still my xterm font of choice, with new 8x16 size (replaces 8x17):

                                XTerm*font:  -*-tamsyn-medium-*-*--16-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
                                
                                  1. 1

                                    Anyone have info on this in contrast to SmartOS?

                                    1. 3

                                      SmartOS basically boots off the USB flash stick and runs in RAM, its only purpose acting as a light hypervisor for VMs in zones (either native ones (like FBSD jails) or KVM (which are also run under zones with QEMU being the only process in a zone)) stored on ZFS on persistent storage.

                                      OmniOS is more traditional in a sense it’s meant to be installed on and used as a host (e.g. for a NAS build), while having all the same tech available.

                                    1. 1

                                      Given this is from an OpenBSD dev, it is a bit strange to be Linux only, no?

                                      1. 1

                                        I see *BSD support is listed in TODO, nice!

                                        1. 1

                                          It looks like kqueue(2) and in turn *BSD support was added. Commit enabling support.

                                      1. 2

                                        Just went to comment that dfly recently commited it than noticed your note.

                                        Typing this from latest DragonFly v3.5.0.233.ge05769-DEVELOPMENT #0: Thu May 23 23:40:10 CEST 2013 compile, the network stack really is snappy, regardless of the SO_REUSEPORT.

                                        There’s nothing cleaner than OpenBSD, but DragonFly is my second OS choice currently.

                                        1. 1

                                          This is wonderful, I now run -stable both on router and workstation (was always on -current before), in part because of this.

                                          Thanks M:Tier!

                                          1. 3

                                            Also, you can put real-names in the files and then grep your address book. :)

                                            1. 1

                                              Excellent idea! Everything stays the same as I originally imagined, only extended in a transparent way (you could also store numbers, postal addresses etc)…

                                              1. 1

                                                A friend complained that he could never remember even the start of email adresses. I proposed to use symlinks for that. :) (You need to add a realpath call to mailto then.)

                                            1. 1

                                              Is this something that exists or is this an outline of an API that you want to build?

                                              1. 2

                                                This appears to be a description of an organization system for email addresses, not a tool per sé. You can implement it yourself already; it uses only common UNIX command-line tools.

                                                Sime has a folder “adr” containing files whose names are email addresses. He uses ls, touch, and rm to list, create, and delete those files. He wrote a shell alias mailto that opens the program mail with the email that is the name of the given file – this is presumably so you can tab-complete filenames to simulate tab-completing email addresses.

                                                1. 1

                                                  Couldn’t put it better myself :)