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    I have always hated the little bits of web dev that I have had to do for work. So I am biting the bullet and building a website so that I can thoroughly understand the whole stack without dealing with corporate red tape. I also might potentially try to build a game on the website sometime. I think I am going to use Deno to learn JS/TS and so that I don’t have to have to use a whole cornucopia of technologies.

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      I don’t have to have to use a whole cornucopia of technologies.

      So with you on that. I recently ramped up my Elm familiarity because I’ve gotten increasingly frustrated with coming back to a project a while later and finding multiple parts becoming outdated. I’ve really come to like the Elm and their architecture. It’s slightly verbose coming from other functional perspectives, but that’s almost nothing compared to how many other grievances it alleviates.

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      Do you have any examples of libraries in other languages or language features, which really should have implemented a well-known concept (Monoid, Monad, Alternative, whatever), but they fell short because they (probably) didn’t know the concept?

      This sort of presumptive arrogance is a massive turnoff for me, and I think that it really hampers my ability to take Haskell users or their community seriously.

      This whole “well-known” idea is glib coming from the community whose running joke is just a monoid in the category of endofunctors–i.e., famously academic and up its own ass.

      A better way (hell, we could start it in this subthread) they could’ve brought this up would’ve been “What Haskell idioms (Maybe, monads, etc.) do other ecosystems implement almost like we would but then diverged? What idioms do we have that’d still be doable in those ecosystems?”

      Instead, it comes off as some ignorant elitist prick dismissing the slovenly masses daring to attempt to fumble their way through shipping code in spite of their own ignorance of the magic of Haskell, somehow managing to cobble together pale imitations of algorithms and techniques in their inferior programming tongues.

      Pandoc and shellcheck are maybe the only Haskell programs I use on a regular basis, but I could get along without them. I couldn’t get along without the flotsam and jetsam of “inferior” languages like C and JS, and I’m kinda amazed that in 2020 people still represent Haskell like this.

      EDIT: Just to be clear, I know some Haskell folks (@pushcx, @shapr) that are kind and just excited and happy to share their experience without shitting on other languages I use…but they seem to be in the minority.

      It’s the difference between “Haskell is the one true language why are you settling for anything else?” versus “I really like Haskell and think it’d be a good fit for your problem, want to talk more about it? If not that’s cool my dude, one day I’ll talk you into it. :)”

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        I totally understand. Do give that community some benefit of doubt though, as this is a link to a thread within the haskell subreddit where the posters feel free to write without having to preface every post/comment with qualifiers as it might get a little tedious if they had to do that on every thread and comment. If we’re not part of that subreddit, in a way, we are peeking in as an outsider and before judging them harshly, we’ll have to read it with their perspective in mind. Hope I’m making sense. I was almost not gonna post here because of the potential for misunderstanding their tone but it was just a really interesting topic and I was wondering if I could get more viewpoints over here. Although now I’m not sure if it was worth it.

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          Thank you for the caution towards charity and reasonableness!

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          I like being called out for kindness and excitement.

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          Honestly I use macos Notes.app for this. It’s really good for taking quick notes and has enough organization for what I need.

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            Keep coming back to this. I think the omnipresence and sync does it for me. I’m looking forward to using a lot more of the handwriting recognition too.

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            Learning C and a game of paintball with friends cause one of them is becoming a dad, followed up by an Indian restaurant which will probably end with me spending my Sunday on the toilet. :-)

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              There’s a resurgence of interest in C apparently, looking through this thread. Kinda inspiring me to rehash it myself. After I’m done with Haskell, maybe I should go back to the kilo project I abandoned. How are you doing your learning. Do you have a structure in mind or like a book or something?

              PS - As for the Indian restaurant, apart from asking it to be less spicy, I suggest getting a generous helping of “ghee” and finishing your meal with a “dahi” dish. The restaurant should know those words. That’s how my folks keeps the burn in check :)

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                That’s how it feels to me too, my Mastodon feed is full of people picking up C (again). Personally I just want to broaden my understanding and having recently picked up Rust, better see what it attempts to improve on. I’m going by the book, doing the basic exercises and then hopefully a small toy project.

                Thank you for the tips! I actually really do like spicy (Vindaloo is my favorite) and normally the afterburn isn’t that bad for me, but this particular restaurant somehow had that effect last time. It’s a restaurant in The Netherlands so my guess is that they’ve toned down all their dishes a lot compared to “the real deal”. Definitely going to try the dahi finisher!

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                  You’re welcome :) and btw been a lomg time since I read that book but I remember it being a really good one - so compact, simple and well written! It’s like the programming equivalent of The Elements of Style. Wish you well on your endeavor!!

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              Ya boy is getting married!

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                Confusion to your enemies!

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                  Congratulations!

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                    Congratulations! My wife is my better half in more ways than I can count :)

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                      Congratulations!

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                        Congratulations!

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                          That’s awesome! Have a great time and congratulation on your wedding!!

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                          I’ve actually stopped using Python for most of my CLI programs because I’ve fallen in such love with the Rust ecosystem. However, this would make me reconsider that decision under certain circumstances. Way to go with building and releasing such awesomeness!

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                            I know it’s just a comment but I put a lot of work in this, so your words mean a lot thank you :) I don’t know much about Rust but either way CLIs really do need to be simple to be enjoyable to write for sure!!

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                            1. Make bunch of dev screencasts for side hustle
                            2. Needs static backend to withstand billions of page views
                            3. Setup jekyll with usual secret library of includes
                            4. Gotta make this library open source
                            5. Ofcourse needs a command line parser to install includes on demand
                            6. jeez this command line parsing library argparse is basic
                            7. Fine, I’ll make it more powerful

                            Sooo a while later and now I have this — action heroes

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                              My two hobbies are woodturning and playing the guitar.

                              Guitar I was a music major in college, and I studied classical guitar between the ages of 12 and 24. It was fun, but I became burnt out by the end of it. I started playing a little here and there a few years ago.

                              Woodturning I find that after a day of living in the abstract (programming) doing something with my hands is extremely rewarding. I started with “flat” woodworking, but then I fell in love with turning this January and have been doing that ever since. I mostly make pens, bottle stoppers and bowls, but I’d really like to get into segmented turning.

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                                Woodturning

                                I’ve semi-recently discovered the wonderful world of woodturning videos on YouTube.

                                Frank Horwath has a ton of videos. Here’s one with a segmented bowl, which I found fascinating.

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                                  I love Frank’s channel! His little bits of stop motion are so fun.

                                  Check out Kyle Toth as well. He does some nice segmented vases. Here’s a mini vase he made

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                                  That sounds lovely! Woodturning is something id really like to get into as soon as i have a stable place to get a lathe.

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                                    ping me on twitter, same as this user name, when you’re in the market for one. Happy to provide any advice I can!