1. 3

    Stop supporting and embracing Electron apps, please.

    1. 3

      Serious question: what’s wrong with Electron apps?

      1. 15

        As someone who just spent a little time attempting a port of an Electron app to FreeBSD, only to quit in disgust, I have a few opinions.

        1. Electron apps are huge. Really, really, really big with a gigantic web of dependencies. Think an 18,408 line Yarn lockfile.

        2. Those dependencies are JavaScript libraries. To put it mildly, there is not a large intersection between the JavaScript community and users of non-mainstream OSs (e.g. FreeBSD). And those libraries tend not to be written in a portable fashion. This example (admittedly from a few years ago now) of a library disregarding $PATH is just one.

        3. Platform support in Electron is a gigantic steaming pile of bogosity based upon the wrong set of abstractions. Instead of learning from the autotools people who were doing this decades ago, they detect platforms, not features. So when a new platform comes along (say, FreeBSD) you can’t just specify which features it has and let it compile. No, you have to create a gigantic patch that touches a bazillion files, everywhere those files check for which platform it’s compiling on.

        4. Once compiled and running, they’re still huge (up to 1GiB of RAM for an IM client!). And - although perhaps this is a reflection of the apps themselves, not the framework - many are sluggish as hell. Neither is an attractive prospect for resource-limited Linux machines, like PinePhones.

        I had thought, prior to attempting a port of an Electron app, that people were unfairly criticizing it. Now having peeked under the covers, I don’t think people are criticizing it enough.

        1. 6

          As someone who isn’t an Electron hater: Electron apps are slow to load and memory hogs, which is something you might live with if you are talking about your IDE or Slack, but starts getting really old when it’s a utility application that should load quickly or spends most of the time in your icon tray. Worse yet: poorly written Electron apps can become CPU hogs as well, but I guess the same goes for all software.

          1. 3

            I agree that lots of Electron apps have issues with poor performance and high memory usage. That said, a well written Electron app can perform well. For example, I’m a heavy user of the Joplin desktop application and in my experience it performs well and has fairly low memory usage (currently under about 200MB) and doesn’t seem to have the issues that plague the Slack client. Admittedly the Slack client is a lot more complex…

            1. 2

              Oh, I agree that there great, performant Electron apps. VSCode is one of my favorite examples of that. Spotify is another one.

              One of my biggest gripes with Electron is that - because of the nature of how it’s embedded in binaries - you usually end up with with several full copies of the whole framework in memory. If you are using KDE or Gnome, most of the processes in your desktop are sharing a significant amount of memory in the form of shared libraries. This tends to be fine in systems with 16Gb+ of memory and a fast CPU, but for people with more meager resources… it’s a drag.

            2. 2

              I’m sure performance issues will be addressed in time.

              1. 13

                Electron has been around since 2013 and still, typing in Slack still has a noticeable latency (that drives me crazy). I also still have to restart it once a day or so, to avoid that it becomes more and more laggy.

                In the meanwhile, ripcord was developed by a single indie developer in Qt. Has most of Slack’s functionality, only uses a fraction of the memory, and is lightning fast. Oh, and it is multi-platform.

                People (not you) claim that it is only possible to write cross-platform applications in Electron. This is nothing further from the truth, people have been writing cross-platforms apps in Qt literally for decades. (And it’s not hard either.)

                1. 2

                  I’m not sure that I would consider Slack a stellar example of an Electron app. Slack is slow even by Electron standards. VS Code’s latency is indistinguishable from typing in the Lobsters comment in Chromium on my middle-of-the-road desktop machine. Discord is a much better Electron-based chat app from a performance standpoint, in my experience.

                  People (not you) claim that it is only possible to write cross-platform applications in Electron. This is nothing further from the truth, people have been writing cross-platforms apps in Qt literally for decades. (And it’s not hard either.)

                  For commercial software, the more important part is not whether it’s possible (or “hard”), but whether it’s commercially viable. Without any hard data one way or another, I’d say that writing Electron apps is much less expensive than writing native Qt apps for most companies (especially since web technology experience is much easier to come by).

                  1. 1

                    I don’t mind electron, but even VS code drops 1-2 frames on keypress on my threadripper desktop (and Chrome/Firefox do not). So far I’m putting up with it for the language server integration.

                2. 3

                  I’m sure once the performance issues are addressed the complaints about performance issues will subside.

                  1. 1

                    I’m looking forward to the day that systems like Electron will compile everything to WebAssembly as a build step. In a way, I think Gary Bernhardt might have been more correct than I gave him credit for in his famous The Birth & Death of JavaScript presentation.

                3. 3

                  There are the utilitarian critiques (they are big and slow) and there’s also the sort of Mac critique (they are not in any way native) and there’s my weird “I HATE THE WEB” critique that is probably not widely shared. I have a couple of them that I use daily, but I really, really, really wish I didn’t.

              1. 2

                Honestly, pulling my hair out over a mailing list management supplier. Basically they held onto a whole load of subscriber data after I closed my account. I went to open a new account for a completely different org and they dropped me back into the old one with all the old subscribers names and email addresses (which they’re billing me for).

                Despite my best efforts over the past couple of weeks they’re doing their best to ignore any attempts for me to try and resolve the situation with them. I’m finding it shocking and infuriating just how little they seem to care about it.

                They’re probably holding 100s of thousands of pieces of PII where people have closed their accounts but not cleared out subscriber lists beforehand (probably because nobody ever told them to).

                1. 1

                  😱

                1. 2

                  There’s quite a lot of content on the Amiga history. David Pleasance has two books: Commodore: The Inside Story and from Vultures to Vampires. He was on the sales side, initially for Commodore UK but later worldwide (he did a lot to rejuvenate sales in the US). There’s a great tech history of the Amiga too, The Future Was Here. And the Cloanto emulator bundle has DVDs in the “you paid top dollar” bundle with some contemporary film.

                  I don’t really know much about the Atari ST side, having been in the Amiga world since 1992 (I currently have two A1200s, a CD32, and a Vampire V4). I’ve read a history Atari Inc: Business is Fun about the company as a whole (it sounds hellishly like they were the template for all the SV bro companies) but it doesn’t go much into the ST as the most tempestuous history was the 2600/E.T./Chuck E. Cheese era.

                  1. 1

                    There’s hardly anything out there about the ST side compared to the Amiga, which is a shame as they must’ve had their share of drama with the lawsuits and Jack Attacks.

                    1. 2

                      The one I’ve found, but not yet read, is Faster Than Light: have you read it?

                      1. 1

                        I’ve read some of it but what put me off was how it skipped over things I found relevant to Atari at the time. My impression is that it’s more concerned with the development of the technology than the business, which explains the light touch. I haven’t bought it because I’m holding out for something more relevant to the business.

                        Also I’m struggling to find out about Irving Gould’s pre-Commodore life - it’s like the guy only existed as a Commodore owner.

                  1. 1

                    Would have been nice to credit all the photos you have used.

                    1. 1

                      It would’ve been, yes but for two problems:

                      1. Crediting a lot of the pictures used is more difficult than you think. The historical pic of Shiraz Shivji used has multiple people claiming it for example. Good luck finding out who owns the Irving Gould picture - in fact there’s very little out there about Gould at all beyond Commodore.
                      2. Putting captions on pictures in Substack is impossible - hence the reference (Image above courtesy of Boston-based collector Timothy Colegrove via wikipedia) and it constrains content by HTML length due to it being newsletter driven while giving you no control over the HTML. I had to chop a lot out just to fit things in and every link added means losing 2-3 paragraphs of text.

                      I’m doing what I can within the constraints of Substack’s platform. That’s why pretty much wherever I’ve posted this I’ve said that I would do additional attributions, corrections and further resources in the next issue - I can then edit the post and link to the next issue with all the attributions. It’s also why I’ve posted further links to resources I found helpful in this submission.

                      1. 1

                        So why post on substack?

                        1. 1

                          Because it’s the least worst environment I’ve used that does both newsletters and regular posting in a fairly seamless way. Yes Substack has constraints, but some of those constraints are quite good at keeping me on a regular schedule and keeping the stuff I write under the point where emails would get cut-off or rejected anyway.

                    1. 4

                      I’m finishing up a Tales From The Dork Web issue for release this Thursday about how the Amiga 1000 came to be. The Dork Web’s publishing schedule is about a week off from the Amiga 1000’s 35th anniversary, but that’s fine. Instead of writing about the Amiga, which anyone who saw a news story last week can find out about, I wanted to write about the people and personalities behind it. Not so much the techies, more the businessmen.

                      1. 1

                        Setting up a bunch of marketing infrastructure for a company I’ve been working with including:

                        • Mailing list setup, integration
                        • Website do-over
                        • Marketing automation integration built around the mailing list and a newsletter using automated curation with a manual filter

                        I’m really happy to finally start this as it consolidates a lot of stuff I’ve been working on for years in one project, is really measurable and should provide solid measurable returns over the next year.

                        1. 13

                          It’s a little worrisome to me that people don’t see through this. It’s grammatically fine, but there is no conceptual power behind the words, which is a common problem (in different forms) with procedural generation algorithms. I would have hoped that readers expect, and can evaluate, coherence of writing beyond grammar. Maybe that’s overly optimistic.

                          1. 26

                            There are plenty of low-quality blog posts with no conceptual power behind their words.

                            1. 4

                              Can you imagine what the content marketing mills will do with this?

                              1. 2

                                Please don’t give them ideas; If I get a new story from Maupassant in my email, there is no way I am not going to read it.

                                1. 1

                                  They’re just replacing humans with robots, which has been the trend for decades in other industries.

                                2. 3

                                  I saw a tweet about jokes generated by GPT-3 being amazing, complete with a screenshot. When I clicked through I found Gwern’s tests. Nothing like what was implied. None of the examples in the screenshot were actual output.

                                  It was the No Man’s Sky of joke writing. Semantically correct but an empty void when it came to humour.

                                  1. 2

                                    Yeah, I got about halfway through the generated post and then just started scrolling, which led me straight to the gotcha. I was completely bored and confused by what the ‘author’ was trying to say. Sure, it was largely grammatically coherent, but bits of it just flat out did not make sense in context. I was especially confused by the line ‘The forum also has many people I don’t like’, which I read about three times trying to work out why the ‘author’ had said that. There were several other bits that tripped me up because they just didn’t make contextual sense. While I could see this tool being useful for generating painting-by-numbers style sports reports and the like I’m not too worried about it putting actual writers with something to say out of a job.

                                    1. 1

                                      ‘The forum also has many people I don’t like’, which I read about three times trying to work out why the ‘author’ had said that.

                                      That was my favorite part. I read it as the bot saying “There’s a lot of people I don’t like, and I’ll show everyone how dumb they are when they think a bot is being intelligent and funny.”

                                    2. 1

                                      It’s grammatically fine, but there is no conceptual power behind the words, which is a common problem (in different forms) with procedural generation algorithms.

                                      And it’s a common problem in people too. Too many lost points on high-school essays…

                                    1. 3

                                      I’ve been using Mailu for years without major issue. iRedmail before that with issues on upgrades and Sovereign before that with even more issues on upgrades.

                                      This was after running Postfix and Dovecot for years somewhat clunkily.

                                      The thing with these packages is that they contain an awful lot of magic. If you’re comfortable with that, then go ahead. I’m fortunate enough in that I understand Mailu’s stack pretty well (it’s a fairly common setup), or at least well enough to go back to Postfix and Dovecot if they stopped maintaining it.

                                      Mail Backups are fairly easy, just set up Borgmatic, point at your mailu folders and you’re mostly done. If you need to start from scratch, copy the mail folders back in, recreate the accounts and the mail is there. You could go further and have full db backups etc if you want, but I’ve restarted several times with Mailu and found folder recovery enough for me.

                                      1. 1

                                        Yes, what I liked about them is that is just open source software.

                                      1. 3

                                        I want to build something to help reduce doom scrolling by automating more of it. If anyone has requests/ideas in this vein, please share.

                                        My initial feeling is to kind of build a more programmable feed reader that can pull from more sources than just RSS (e.g. news aggregators like lobsters/hn/reddit, also twitter) and does some basic aggregation and filtering to surface topics that are particularly discussed that day, and maybe convert that into a daily newsletter. I’d love to get to a point where I trust my doomscroller to be better at doomscrolling than I am, so that I can “let go” better.

                                        1. 1

                                          Not a direct input, but I thought this article by Aaron Schwartz was interesting. http://www.aaronsw.com/weblog/hatethenews

                                          That being said I am a doomscroller too and don’t practice this, but maybe I should try.

                                          1. 1

                                            Good share, thanks. I remember this piece from a long time ago but have forgotten it.

                                            I can’t say I agree with it entirely–I don’t believe that news and policy is a closed system, having a representative audience is super important for it to operate (like a kind of currency/power behind the publication). But at the same time, I do agree with a lot of points like daily news is actively harmful, and weekly or longer intervals are probably much more appropriate.

                                            One other thing I fear regarding politics vs news is that news is usually the consequences of political choices. It’s hard to say you can be an informed voter just by reading a short guide and while remaining unaware of the consequences of your choices years down the line. But of course one thing Aaron never touched on is how broken news is today, how many news organizations around the world are owned by just several billionaires. It’s certainly a tricky and evolving subject that I think we’re all still learning how to navigate appropriately.

                                          2. 1

                                            I deleted my FB/IG and barely use Twitter anymore. My workflow is:

                                            1. Read RSS (I use Feedly and have subscribed to dozens of sources). I either read pieces as I’m checking my feed, or send them to Instapaper to read later.
                                            2. Export from Instapaper to Kindle (10 at a time)
                                            3. Read longer pieces on Kindle

                                            I do not trust automation in step 1 - I’m ruthless about keeping my RSS subscriptions to sources that I like, trust, and can manage (aka not the default nytimes feed for example).

                                            1. 1

                                              At what point do you decide to post comments on lobsters? Is that via an RSS summary? Or is that part of another workflow?

                                              I do want something that is friendly to some amount of engagement.

                                            2. 1

                                              Have you considered looking into Huginn? It has a bit of a learning curve but is worth it. I use Huginn to automate daily digest emails containing:

                                              • Posts from instagram accounts I’m interested in (I haven’t done instagram in years)
                                              • My current crypto portfolio value, broken down by token
                                              • New Rental properties in parts of Ireland I’m interested in moving to
                                              • The number of COVID cases detected in the past 24 hours in my neighbourhood
                                              • Massively underpriced flights and large Amazon discounts (the latter gets fed into my Amazon discount site I’m building)

                                              I also use Huginn to take in lobsters, hn and reddits I’m interested in, filter out the top and generate an RSS feed that goes into RSS Bot. I then use Wallabag to bookmark interesting things for later, the starred RSS for which goes back into the daily digest and I use for the links in my Tales From The Dork Web newsletter that comes out once a fortnight.

                                              1. 1

                                                I haven’t heard of huginn, thanks for the lead! Definitely looks in the realm of what I was imagining.

                                                How long have you been using it? Any noteworth changes to your day-to-day lifestyle/workflow since then? Has it helped much with the doomscrolling vibes?

                                                1. 1

                                                  I completely shut out instagram with it. Most of my Twitter activity is automated.

                                                  I use it less to avoid doomscrolling and more for not having to sort through things I visit by hand. You could use an RSS feed with Google alerts, pull each page, check sentiment then put everything that has a certain positive or higher score into a digest though. I do find I spend more time picking up stuff when I want to than obsessiveley checking for new things.

                                            1. 2

                                              I bought a dad jokes twitter account last week for £23. I’m going to build a database of painful dad jokes. I’ll use this to build a dad joke website/app and merch. While I will monetise the account in time, I want to do it in a lightweight, relevant and responsible way. I also want to automate elements of joke curation once I have it up and running, possibly through voting. It’s more an experiment than anything else.

                                              On the day job side this week I’m overhauling a customer’s Ahrefs account so the site audits work properly, and investigating Quora as a marketing tool. Quora is heavily abused, but I also think it’s massively underserved for projects solving genuine problems.

                                              1. 2

                                                I’ve been using NC since before the Owncloud split. If what you’re looking for is file sync, then it’s great. The WebDAV and CalDAV support has at times been variable, but I have something that works and works well for me. It’s clear OP hasn’t resolved the problems they’ve had and perhaps that’s the difference:

                                                1. If you’re self hosting NextCloud’s Open Source offering, you’re responsible for making sure it works.
                                                2. If you’re running Synology software on Synology hardware, or using a Nextcloud provider, then you shift the responsibility to them.

                                                I don’t see this as a $x is better than $y thing - it’s outsourcing your time and maintenance responsibility for money. Nextcloud does primarily several things: Calendar, Contact and File sync. If all you need is file sync Syncthing or Seafile is probably better. If you need something a bit more with a dropbox-like web interface, it’s pretty good. The workflow support has a lot of potential too. In an ideal world I’d have native webhooks so I can integrate Huginn but that’s about it for me.

                                                1. 5

                                                  Do we have a lot of Lobsters on Windows? I keep debating doing a “Windows is Not Unix” guide for people who are moving to Windows + WSL2, but I keep convincing myself there’s no interest. The fact this is so high on the front page makes me wonder if I’m wrong.

                                                  1. 4

                                                    I use a Surface Book pretty regularly and run WSL2 on it. Although I also have a Linux desktop and a work-issued Macbook Pro.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      I use Windows at work.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Ditto.

                                                      2. 2

                                                        I switched full-time to Windows about a year ago. I avoid WSL as much as possible, even going so far as to send PRs to open source projects that assume a Linux environment. I actually find it quite rewarding!

                                                        1. 2

                                                          I do that but for BSD instead of Windows ;)

                                                        2. 2

                                                          I’m interested. I use Linux as my primary desktop computing environment, but some things I do some of the time (e.g. building games for Unity) go better on Windows. And every time I try to adopt Windows for a few days, I’m a bit stymied. I feel like so many people use this, there must be something wrong with my workflow that’s making it feel so wrong to me.

                                                          This article is helpful and kind of sniffs around the edges. But I’d really be interested to learn more about what a really “Windows Native” workflow looks like and what people who use that all the time consider appealing about it. So if you post it, I hope it gets some attention here. Because even if I won’t ever be a “Windows person” I think I’m making myself suffer needlessly when I do use it, and I’d like to be educated about how to be more effective on it.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            For what it’s worth, I think your experience is very common (which is why ‘Windows’ gets followed immediately by ‘WSL’.)

                                                            As far as I can tell - and for no good reason - Linux users have a good command line and tend to use it, and Windows developers end up with a good IDE and tend to use it, and in both cases the thing not being used is neglected. So switching platforms is really about switching cultures and embracing a very different workflow. People going in both directions see the new platform as “inferior” because they’re judging the quality of tools used to implement their previous workflow.

                                                            As someone who really loves the command line, Windows has often felt like it required me to “suffer needlessly.” Personally I ended up writing my own command processor to incorporate a few things that the Linux command line environment “got right” and it ended up being extended with many interactive things. I haven’t felt like I’m suffering or missing out by using Windows after that, although clearly there’s a personal bias since those tools are designed for my workflow. If you don’t like mine, then it pays to learn Powershell, which is also a big cultural adjustment since the basic idioms are very different to textual Posix shells.

                                                            To me the most “appealing” part of being a Windows developer is WinDbg, which also has a steep learning curve but it’s far better than anything I’ve used on Linux and is much more capable than Visual Studio for systems level debugging. It’s one of those “best kept secret” type things that’s easy to get - once you know it exists and that it makes serious development much easier.

                                                          2. 1

                                                            I use Windows at work (though work is Microsoft Research, so that’s not very surprising). I use WSL1 and a FreeBSD VM. I don’t think WSL2 yet has the nice PTY and pipe integration in WSL1. With WSL, I can run cmd.exe in a *NIX shell (including something like Konsole in VcXsrv) and it works. More usefully, I can run the Visual Studio Command Prompt batch file to get a Windows build environment from my WSL environment. If a Windows program creates a named pipe in the WSL-owned part of the filesystem namespace, it is a Linux named pipe.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              I reluctantly use Windows, but I try to avoid it. There’s rarely anything I want to use that is only available on Windows with no viable alternative. Still, there are times I have to use it. I haven’t bothered with WSL2 but I would still read something like this if it existed.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                My work/play machine at home is Windows. Always has been. (Because games, obviously, and I don’t like dual boot.)

                                                                I detest working on Windows though and WSL hasn’t improved anything for me yet, that’s why I still do most of my work via PuTTY on a linux box if possible. (work means any ops/programming work I do in my free time).

                                                                Work machine is Linux and I’m actually glad I couldn’t work on Windows so no one can push me :P

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  I’ve recently committed Linux apostasy :) partly on account of WSL2, and I’d definitely be interested in that. I haven’t used Windows, except to run putty to log in to a remote server, in a very, very long time (in fact, save for a brief period between 2011 and 2012, when I worked on a cross-platform tool, I haven’t really used it in 15+ years, the last version I used regularly was Windows 2000). I’m slowly discovering what’s changed since then but 15 years is a lot of time…

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    I’m on Windows and routinely browse lobsters by looking at the ‘windows’ tag.

                                                                    That said, I really don’t understand the point of moving to Windows to then run WSL2. Using WSL2 is using a Linux VM, and for the most part, the issues there are not about Windows. If you want a Linux VM, you can run one on any platform…

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      Well, it’s a damn convenient VM :). I’ve tried it as an experiment for a month or so – I’m now on an “extended trial” of sorts, I guess, for 6 months (backups over the network, all Linux-readable – if I ever want to go back I just have to install Linux again). I use it for two reasons:

                                                                      • It’s a good crutch – I’m sure everything I could do under Linux can be just as easily be done under Windows but 20 years of muscle memory don’t get erased overnight. It lets me do things I haven’t had time to figure out how to efficiently do under Windows in a manner that I’m familiar with. I could do all that with a VM, too, but it’s way better when it works out of the box and boots basically instantaneously.
                                                                      • It gets me all the good parts of Linux – from mutt to a bunch of network/security tools and from ksh to my bag of scripts – without any of the bad parts. Of course, that can also be done with a VM – but like I said, this one works out of the box and boots instantaneously :).

                                                                      I don’t use it too much – in the last two weeks I don’t think it’s seen six hours of use. I fire it up to read some mailing lists (haven’t yet found anything that handles those as well as mutt – even Pegasus Mail isn’t as cool as I remember it…), and I fiddle with one project inside it, mostly because it’s all new to me, and I want to work on it in a familiar environment (learning two things at a time never goes well).

                                                                      I still haven’t made up my mind on keeping it, we’ll see about that in six months, but I’m pretty sure I’d have never even considered the experiment without WSL2.

                                                                    2. 1

                                                                      My monitor + video card setup is aimed at gaming and is almost entirely unusable on Linux period. I’m looking at replacing the graphics card in the future, but until that happens, Windows is the only tolerable OS.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        I like to play video games, which almost always means “you need windows”.

                                                                        I used to dual boot Debian but nowadays I tend to just ssh into a cloudish instance thing that I use as a kind of remote workstation. That combined with vscode’s wonderful remote support means outside of work most of my personal-hacking-stuff still takes place through the window of… well, windows.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        Now subscribed to dorkweb. Side note: can you please stop making me so melancholic by posting Evangelion pictures ;)

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          Thanks for subscribing. This might help with the melancholia.

                                                                        1. 8

                                                                          I physically spat my drink out reading this headline. I’m amazed System76 can - with a straight face - harp on about open source hardware while using a closed-source GPU with proprietary blobs everywhere.

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            I had what I think is my first ever github pull request for my watch project. My new 2020 version watches arrived so I’m going to look at integrating the pull request and rewriting it so it’s less of a mess.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              Nice find! I use rss-bridge myself, but will definitely give this a try.

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                Wordpress already uses /feed, therefore it’d probably make more sense to use /feed over /feeds given the relative popularity.

                                                                                1. 12

                                                                                  I’m having a hard time understanding why Signal is being treated as a “private” solution, when it requires to submit a real phone number. SIM cards are tightly coupled with real name and citizen identification numbers, which is the ultimate goal of every identification technique. Well, some countries maybe allow buying anonymized SIM cards, but I don’t think it’s legal in lots of countries. Plus, the privacy policy of Signal contains this clause:

                                                                                  Information we may share: Third Parties. We work with third parties to provide some of our Services. For example, our Third-Party Providers send a verification code to your phone number when you register for our Services. These providers are bound by their Privacy Policies to safeguard that information. If you use other Third-Party Services like YouTube, Spotify, Giphy, etc. in connection with our Services, their Terms and Privacy Policies govern your use of those services.

                                                                                  Does that mean that they share the phone number with multiple third-parties? Maybe I misunderstand something, but it doesn’t sound very “private”.

                                                                                  In other news, this article contains so much assumptions that something is bad, and something is good, without giving any rationalization why author thinks this way. This forces me to not treat the article seriously ;)

                                                                                  1. 6

                                                                                    Does that mean that they share the phone number with multiple third-parties? Maybe I misunderstand something, but it doesn’t sound very “private”.

                                                                                    Your phone number is shared with their verification service. Your phone number is not shared with YouTube, Spotify, Giphy, etc..

                                                                                    Signal knows you use their service. They do not know with whom you’ve communicated.

                                                                                    1. 4

                                                                                      The same reason people recommend Protonmail and Tutanota, which don’t comply with open standards like IMAP and the latter of which makes claims about things being open source when it’s demonstrably untrue.

                                                                                      Hype, spin and assuming people are being fully open when their definition of what constitutes ‘fully’ can vary wildly.

                                                                                      1. 4

                                                                                        I think the phone number requirement makes a lot of sense, especially for email-related services. Abuse is rampant. I worked on a email-based support system (e.g. like ZendDesk) and we had people using scripts to keep signing up new accounts and spam until they hit the rate limits. It didn’t matter that we limited the number of recipients: they would just send loads of emails anyway. They just paid the €5/month to avoid the free-trail rate limits which existed solely to prevent abuse (using a stolen CC?) With really aggressive rate-limiting and limits I eventually solved most of the problem, but people still tried, and it still affected our sender reputation (although within manageable levels). The entire thing was no fun at all, and the more protection you have against abuse like this, the better IMO. This doesn’t just protect the service, but also (potential) scam victims.

                                                                                        tl;dr: spammers are assholes.

                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                          I did actually look into this. If you look carefully you’ll see a 1.x clock bitmap is the Timer mode icon. I think it’s from 1.3.

                                                                                          I had ideas while using Bodmer’s TFT_eSPI to reimplement the clock. Initially I wanted to see if I could knock up a 68k emulator and run the code from the original binary on it, but I realised I’d need to pull apart the hunk binary format and reverse engineer it.

                                                                                          From what I could tell it looks like the Workbench clock binary draws the screen by hand as polygons. I would like to reimplement it or ideally simulate it but I don’t have a 1.3 install to hand with snoopdos and resource on the same box. When I started using LVGL I realised that it (or rather I) isn’t really very good for drawing custom primitives.

                                                                                          At the moment my plan is to take a break and focus on learning more about FreeRTOS task management and more about LVGL and how it’s put together. Then I’ll look at doing another rewrite but from the ground up instead of using the TTGO library nCov example as the basis.

                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                            AROS is a binary compatible Amiga runtime, and the clock is going to be a standard Intuition app, so you can probably take what you need to run the original clock binary from there (or use their clock tool).

                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                              I’m familiar with AROS as a user, but not so much with the code underneath. Part of the reason I decided not to pursue active emulation was that it would take an awful lot of time to get things to a point where it could run a single clock app, but there’s a whole load of secondary issues from UI to power saving that complicate matters even more.

                                                                                              ISTR AROS needing an MMU, not sure whether I imagined that or not.

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                I think you did :). The platform page for m68k suggests a 68020 with >=6MB fast RAM, and the 68020 didn’t have FPU or MMU.

                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                          I’ve been working on a Dork Web issue about how I use RSS as I use it so extensively, but in terms of what I use:

                                                                                          • I use RSS Bot on Mac as a meta-desktop notifier. My Macbook is the only platform I have RSS notifications on, and I keep them limited.
                                                                                          • I use Huginn to collate, deduplicate, score, trim and consolidate RSS and JSON feeds from tons of different sources, then generate new feeds for different key topics. I then subscribe to these topics.
                                                                                          • Huginn also sends me daily digest mails that contain information extracted from RSS feeds on everything from reported COVID cases in my area to rental information on areas I want to move to through to instagram posts of interest (I don’t have an active instagram account). I used to use RSS2Email for this, but Huginn gives me better control over formatting.
                                                                                          • On Windows I still use FeedDemon as my RSS reader but for how much longer I don’t know. I’ve been meaning to get Rainlendar integrated with RSS so I can ditch FeedDemon.
                                                                                          • On my Amiga 4000 I use AmRSS to watch for discussion threads on Amiga forums, and for deals on Amibay. Some feed sources use HTTPS and AmRSS doesn’t support the latest AmiSSL, so I have a PHP script based on coto_rss that acts as a proxy. Also by handing off TLS processing to my server, it means that my CPU is less taxed when updating feeds.

                                                                                          I have used other tools like Miniflux, TT-RSS, Nextcloud news and other web-based readers but honestly I don’t like using a web browser to avoid browing web sites.