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    Putting another layer of insulation in my new loft! Never done it before, but I suspect it’ll be worth the savings.

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      We still don’t have water back at our existing (rented) house after Storm Arwen hit last Friday, but today we got the keys to our new house (15 minutes away), and we have water there. Looking forward to a proper shower! We’re expecting to move “for realz” in two weeks time—until then we’ll paint internal ceilings and walls, and clean, interspaced by $DAY_JOB.

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        Apparently going out for more logs for our wood burner, as electricity, phone, and mobile reception has been out for close to 20 hours curtesy of Storm Arwen—and without electricity we have no gas central heating. Currently at in-laws charging devices, before heading home to light the fire.

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          This looks good, from a skim of the first sections, but requires some time to go through!

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            Lack of static type checking and checks for exhaustive pattern matching leave a lot of room for errors. Having worked on compiler-adjacent (program analysis) tools in both Clojure and Haskell, I would not recommend Clojure for the task. Before switching to Haskell for program analysis projects, I attempted to use spec (and before that Typed Clojure) and unit tests as a replacement for type checking. The result was an ad hoc, informally-specified, bug-ridden, slow implementation of not even half of Haskell’s type system.

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              The result was an ad hoc, informally-specified, bug-ridden, slow implementation of not even half of Haskell’s type system.

              I see what you did there. 👏

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              I’m not a security expert, but I found it fascinating to read about all this ceremony. The lengths they go to were eyebrow-raising for me: the modified air-gapped laptop with no hard-drive, booting from CD-ROMs stored in a tamper-proof bag in a safe—and the whole OS being reproducible. Incredible.

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                If you’re looking for more the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority put recordings of all of their key ceremonies on YouTube :) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChND9hEeJQjtLDFZ-m8U47A

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                  On the one hand it sounds like paranoid overkill. On the other hand, the cost of it is low relative to the risk.

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                  A lot of the comments in on this thread brings to mind the following quote from Babel:

                  The monk turned to Kaimu, whose jaw had gone somewhat slack. “What do the annals say on the subject of the Misunderstood Lesson?”

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                    From the “update” at the bottom:

                    Go on, bag on me for being ignorant. I know what that really means.

                    What does that really mean?

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                      I took it as a gender bias comment. This is a successful woman in tech who has faced harsh criticism from her peers, over the years, for being a woman in a male dominated industry.

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                        I agreed with you since it made sense, but after reading THE ONE from the other comment, I no longer agree. It seems just a screed against internet trolls who work in positions where they never could break prod or, in this case, make database design decisions.

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                          Good catch! I bet we’re both right to some extent, however! ;)

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                          And how were we to know the gender of the author just by reading the article?

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                            Well, that’s easy. She just wrote this post for you.

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                              Touche, missed that line :)

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                              They’re quite a well known blogger and their blog is called “Rachel by the bay”.

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                            Her post THE ONE, which she links to in the first paragraph, should make it clearer.

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                              That the commenter is more interested in putting someone down to make themselves feel/appear better than in actually engaging with the content of the article.

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                                I’m not entirely sure, but I hope the author isn’t too harsh on themselves.

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                                This week I’m doing PagerDuty incident commander training, and working with a colleague on a proposal to remove an unbound queue as $service’s primary interface, because queues don’t fix overload.

                                Outside of work it’s much the same as always: playing guitar, reading (currently Martha Wells’ Murderbot Diaries), exercising, & keeping my 9yo son alive.

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                                  For what it’s worth CircleCI’s frontend is in TypeScript. The ClojureScript frontend was retired last year.

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                                    The last Friday of every month is “release day” at ${DAYJOB}. We release a new version of our product on the last Friday of every month. The week leading up to the release is what I call “hell week” where I work around 12-14 hour days building the appliance firmware, testing it in various environments, fixing bugs, rebuilding, retesting, etc. until Thursday evening.

                                    This week was that “hell week.”

                                    I absolutely love my dog, and I love his cuddles, especially since he’s really not that affectionate of a dog, but I don’t sleep well when he does decide to cuddle. It’s bittersweet. I’m so tired. I’m having a freakton of fun at work, but I’m tired.

                                    I plan to sleep. And also to write the HardenedBSD October 2021 Status Report. And that is it.

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                                      How often do releases go bad, thus torpedoing your weekend?

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                                        Haven’t had one go bad, yet!

                                        Granted, I’m rewriting from scratch my employer’s entire product line. :-)

                                        When I joined in May of 2020, they had some really cool tech on their hands. The problem: it wasn’t integrated together well at all. There was no cohesion. So I’m now redesigning the entire product from the ground up to evolve the underlying concepts of the cool tech.

                                        We’ve yet to actually sell the new product. These releases are currently internal-only. Once the re-envisioned product is actually shipping, we’ll likely move to the second Tuesday or Wednesday of every month, in similar vein as Microsoft’s Patch Tuesday.

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                                          A monthly “hell week” for internal releases sounds suboptimal. I have very little context, of course, and I saw you said you have fun at work—which is great! But the moniker alone implies it’s unsustainable in the long term, and I would address that as a matter of priority. Nobody is well-served by burn-out: not you, nor the company.

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                                            Fully agreed with you there. The “last Friday of every month” thing is just what works for the team right now as we work to reinvent the company. Once we’re at a point where we can actually sell what we’re working on, then we’ll switch to either the second Tuesday or Wednesday.

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                                      • Sadly no dinghy-racing this weekend due to unfavourable combination of wind, tides, daylight & personnel shortages (for crewing the safety boat).
                                      • Packing up things for the impending house move, and watching the last episodes of a Chinese manga with my wife.
                                      • Planning to film myself playing guitar, and send it to my guitar teacher.
                                      • Taking my 9yo son fencing.

                                      The fencing is quite a long drive away, and late in the evening. So we tend to sleep in and have a slow morning, relaxing and reading in bed. We set off mid afternoon to beat the rush traffic, cook a late lunch on the camper van stove, and relax for an hour before fencing class. Finally we drive home, slowly, in the dark. A great father-and-son bonding day :-)

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                                        If you have cycles in your graph of services you will regret it.

                                        Agree 100%. I’ve spent much of the last year planning & building a replacement for a feature with these characteristics. I’ve moved teams now, but I’m happy to say it just went to public preview.

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                                          I enjoyed this, but probably didn’t spend enough time evaluating each. I too went through in blind mode. I ended up on “overpass mono”, and was happy with my choice until I made the switch in Emacs: suddenly it was too tall and thin! I’ll stick with Jetbrains Mono for now, but it would sure be interesting to go back and find out where that lost out in the contest :-)

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                                            Heading home from one sailing trip to wash my kit, pack, drive to an airport and fly off to Greece for another sailing trip.

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                                              I’m a bit envious, having recently taken up (dinghy) sailing as a step to hopefully trying bigger boats. One of my favourite books as a kid was about a family that sailed around the world. I’ve no idea why I never took it up sooner!

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                                                Ah man, it’s so much fun. I was lucky enough to spend some of my childhood summers on chartered yachts and got the bug from there. Got into dinghy sailing in the last couple of years and then this year a couple of my friends have independently bought their own yachts so I jumped at the chance to crew for them. One did the same as you’re thinking by the sounds of it, decided he liked sailing (from watching Youtube videos) so started dinghy sailing, did Day Skipper & chartered in Greece and now owns an Oyster 435 which we’ve just spent some time delivering up the west coast of England/Wales so she’s nearer his home.

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                                                  Yep, you’ve got the gist of it! I haven’t got as far as looking at yachts yet though.

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                                              I’m on call, so will stay close to computer. Though our rota tends to be quiet so I don’t expect to be called. I’ve arranged cover for a few hours on Sunday afternoon so I can take my son sailing.

                                              Saturday I’ll be watching Minecraft Live with my 9yo son. He’s super excited and spent the last couple days making an outfit so he can cosplay as his Minecraft skin. And we have Minecraft themed-snacks!

                                              Also dealing with papers from solicitor, as I’m in the process of buying a new hous.

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                                                I’m a bit sad that this was not updated to reflect the changes after I fixed the bug the author reported against SBJson in 2016.

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                                                  Moving to new team at work!

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                                                    Taking my son to fencing class today.

                                                    For work, will do onboarding 1 to 1 meeting at least an hour every day; just like the last few weeks. I quite enjoy it—on the one hand I like helping people, and in the other it gives me an opportunity to calibrate my understanding of our systems: if I can’t explain it, I probably don’t understand it.

                                                    Also spending some time co-writing a blog post for the company blog, with a colleague I look up to and take a lot of inspiration from.

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                                                      I’m still not sure how I feel about Silverblue as the future, especially as a developer’s OS. I’ve never really used it in anger though. I wonder if there will ever be an upgrade path from Workstation to Silverblue?

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                                                        Silverblue sounds OK to me; it feels like how I’m used to macOS being updated. I’m more sceptical about Toolbox.

                                                        I don’t mind (much) deploying containers, but I categorically don’t want to use them locally on my machine for dev environments. Perhaps I’m misunderstanding how Toolbox would work, but my experience using Docker (on a Mac) has effectively inoculated me against the idea of containers for dev environments. We use that at work and I’m finding it frustrating.

                                                        Nix has a better story for dev environments IMHO, and thankfully Nix seem to be gaining some traction at work. We are starting to see shell.nix files checked into projects which means less need to run stuff in Docker.

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                                                          Toolbox uses container technology, but it is not like Docker. Toolbox containers pretty much act like independent hosts - think of them as like VMs, but with a shared kernel and shared resources, and /home and such automatically shared so you don’t have to muck around with copying files to and from the container.

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                                                          Silverblue is, to me, a solution looking very hard for a problem to solve. I don’t see what actual issues warrant this shift, nor what improvement Silverblue is on “regular” Fedora.

                                                          Also, the vast majority of containers I see are based on Debian or Ubuntu, and I’m using Fedora exactly because I don’t want to run any of those on my own machines.

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                                                            An alternative understanding, that I’m trying to be open to, is that Silverblue is a solution for a lot of problems that people who aren’t using Linux yet have. Or, at least, for problems that people who are trying to use Linux in some specific environments/specific deployment cases have.

                                                            I played with Silverblue back when it was first introduced and I got pretty much the same impression. It makes a lot of things I need (e.g. managing local changes) harder to do, in order to solve a bunch of problems I don’t have in the first place, or which are entirely self-inflicted by the distro. The very description that the author uses – “a image based OS model, similar to what people had gotten used to on their phones” raises the obvious question of why I would want my desktop to work like that security nightmare, unreviewable, CVE exhibition thrashfire that my phone is.

                                                            On the other hand, a good chunk of today’s computer industry either uses this exact deployment model (Apple) or would really, really like to use it (Microsoft, were it not for those pestering users). Maybe, if it’s not what “the people” want, it’s at least something that makes development easier. I’m not sure. Lots of things people seem to love about it (e.g. easy rollbacks) are things I can’t even remember the last time I needed on a desktop/laptop, maybe I’m just not the target audience here.

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                                                              Silverblue’s ability to rollback seems like a solid improvement.

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                                                                It’s not the same mechanism, but the way I understand it, the end result is not much different from suse’s snapper which will take a root fs snapshot before each update. You lose the immutability, but keep the rollback. There are similar wrappers for Fedora too.