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    Most of these costs could be reduced by running a static site like Hugo or Jekyll, for one there are GitHub Actions that run pngcrush etc over your blog to reduce image size.

    I run my site off AWS, and my costs are:

    • DNS (Route53) $0.51 for the hosted zone and DNS queries
    • Amplify around $0.10 for bandwidth and build time, but could be reduced by using GitHub actions or building locally.
    • Domain name $0.90 / month

    Could be reduced even further by using Netlify and GitHub Actions but I’m too lazy to do that.

    I mean for a blog do you need a VPS when a static site will do?

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      But I don’t want a static site. I use Wordpress and am very happy with it. It’s all about personal choice. :)

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        Sure thing everyone has a different opinion.

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      Colleague of mine tried to install Linux on the Macbook we got him for work (2019 model, touchbar macbook pro 15”).

      I can say that it was a lesson in futility, patience and over-all unpleasantness.

      Aside from the obvious (no touchbar support, no esc key) there were issues such as fan control and the keyboard. Can you imagine having a laptop where you can’t use the keyboard? This is apparently fixed in kernel 5.3.

      One of the major things was trying to bypass the system integrity protection.

      I wouldn’t recommend buying an Apple Laptop if you intend to install another OS on it; it’s just too much work and there is equivalent quality hardware out there.

      There is a good (active) document of people trying to do this though: https://gist.github.com/roadrunner2/1289542a748d9a104e7baec6a92f9cd7

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        thanks for this, it has been in my todo list for a long time, but I never really got to try because afraid of this exact kind of issues.

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          What laptop do you recommend then?

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            ThinkPads are high quality machines and are well supported on Linux (and at least some other free operating systems).

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              For the most part all the BSDs have good thinkpad support, especially as Intel/Radeon graphics drivers are under a BSD license. Haiku and illumos often have good support as well, usually porting the code from the BSDs.

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                Thanks: I thought support was pretty good on the BSDs, but I wasn’t sure about the uniformity, and suspected, but didn’t know, that things like Haiku and illumos would too.

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              As with all things it depends;

              If you want a thin&light and don’t care about ports there’s the new Dell XPS 13” (with a 16:10 display!).

              If you need something with a bit more ports and a rugged chassis, great keyboard I’d go with the Dell Latitude.

              More power and it’s the XPS 15.

              Most power and it’s the Asus ROG Zephryus G14 (AMD cpu).

              There are countless others and alternatives here, but all of the above are practically on par with the MacBook line.

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                I have a Matebook X Pro (2018 model) and it works great with Linux. Dell’s XPS and Precision lines are also well supported. But the gold standard is ThinkPads. At least that’s what Google would give its employees if they wanted a Linux laptop.

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                Yeah it just seems like a nightmare.

                I think my model (2015) was pretty much the last in the lineup before T2 got introduced and there seems to be a myriad of problems with stuff like getting sound working and the keyboard stuff you’ve mentioned.

                It’s a real shame because they’re great hardware

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                  One of the major things was trying to bypass the system integrity protection.

                  Could you elaborate on this? Where exactly did he try to bypass SIP?

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                  I really like it. I might have a go at making a Jekyll theme based off your CSS.

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                    Please do! It’s very similar to rauchg.com, I like minimal blogs and that one was the main inspiration for me. This one is also good yoshuawuyts.com .

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                    Getting fed up with people banging on about the price of EC2, yes it’s more expensive than hosting your own servers but it sure beats getting called up at 4am because a disk exploded. People just think they can shove a server in a colo facility and be done with it, when the exact opposite is true.

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                      Moving your servers to a new data center is another significant opportunity cost.
                      Our data center move occupied a substantial portion of the department for months.

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                        It’s always a tradeoff… If they’re valuing one-time costs of the server payment and don’t experience much overhead by keeping it running (electricity,maintenance,hardware(disk) replacement..), then it’s probably a huge win for them. As they’re now able to run this 24/7 without seeing a bill-counter ticking up on their amazon site. But if you have more of an overhead keeping it running locally or need to scale faster, of course, go with the cloud solution.

                        In the same way I’m using root-vservers where I have 0% steal, guaranteed hardware but still am running on a KVM system and a RAID 10. This way I don’t have to deal with defective SSDs or a hardware outage, but I also don’t have to pay amazon $160 USD/mo* if I want a constant pricing. Because most of my stuff runs 24/7, “pay-per-usage” would be “pay 24/7” at my current CPU usage and traffic. (try running a syncthing-relay from that..)

                        *Current prices for lighthouse.

                        Edit: And of course it’s completely depending on the fact I don’t have huge spikes or dynamic load.

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                          Another downside of pushing 4 million QPS to a single server—whether you’re using EC2 or something you host yourself—is that the blast radius of any single server doing 4 million QPS is massive. I’d much rather have a bunch of tiny servers doing the same overall QPS than a few large servers. Beyond the blast radius of a single server failing, this also allows you to have more fine-grained blue/green deployments.

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                            Almost all monoliths IME are running a single primary database so nearly everyone has the same issue: “if the primary DB goes down, most everything goes down”.

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                              I guess I’m spoiled/have been spared this scenario by my employer.

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                            You can also get managed hardware (via Rackspace, e.g.) where you are the only tenant but Rackspace admins will monitor and correct any hardware issues. We ran a $100m business on five production machines. It was probably the same cost as EC2 but much better disk I/O, we knew exactly how far they would scale, no noisy neighbors, etc.

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                              I wonder if Rackspace would still be the best managed hardware provider for a fledgling company to use. Their website has so much marketing fluff these days, and they want you to talk strategy with a salesperson. If I were in a position to choose a managed dedicated hosting provider, I’d want a no-bullshit website with transparent pricing.

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                                For sure, this was 8 years ago. They were acquired by IBM years ago and so I’m sure all value has been erased from them by now.

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                            That’s awesome. I’m converting my blog to Hugo now, and likely using S3 for images/js/css. It’s about 3x faster than my current setup. It’s the way to go for blogging.

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                              You can use AWS Amplify too. It takes all the heavy lifting out of CloudFront. Every time you push a commit it builds your site and pushes it out to CloudFront.