1. 3

    I have found that glances, https://nicolargo.github.io/glances/, gives a nice overview of your system (I/O, network, processes, memory) and I haven’t used htop for a while now.

      1. 16

        Unfortunately, the comparison is written in such a clearly biased way that it probably makes fossil sound worse than it is (I mean you wouldn’t need to resort to weasel words and name-calling if fossil was valid alternative whose benefits spoke for themselves .. right?). Why would anyone write like that if their aim is to actually promote fossil?

        1. 5

          The table at the top is distractingly polemic, but the actual body of the essay is reasonable and considers both social and technical factors.

          My guess is that author is expecting the audience to nod along with the table before clicking through to the prose; it seems unlikely to be effective for anyone who doesn’t already believe the claims made in the table.

          1. 4

            This is what’s turned me off from even considering using it.

          2. 12

            “Sprawling, incoherent, and inefficient”

            Not sure using a biased comparison from the tool author is useful. Even then, the least they could do is use factual language.

            This is always something that gripes me reading the recurring fossil evangelism: git criticism is interesting and having a different view should give perspective, but the fossil author always use this kind of language that makes it useless. Git adapts to many kind of teams and workflow. The only thing I take from his comparison is that he never learnt to use it and does not want to.

            Now this is also a very valid criticism of git: it is not just a turn-key solution, it needs polish and another system needs to put forth a specific work organization with it. That’s a choice for the project team to make. Fossil wants to impose its own method, which of course gives a more architected, polished, finish, but makes it impossible to use in many teams and projects.

            1. 2

              Maybe they don’t care about widely promoting fossil and just created that page so people stop asking about a comparison?

            2. 5

              One of the main reasons for me for not using Fossil is point 2.7 on that list: “What you should have done vs. What you actually did”. Fossil doesn’t really support history rewrites, so no “rebase” which I use nearly daily.

              1. 2

                This is also a problem with Git. Like you, I use rebase daily to rewrite history, when that was never really my objective; I just want to present a palatable change log before my changes are merged. Whatever happens before that shouldn’t require something as dangerous as a rebase (and force push).

                1. 4

                  I don’t think it makes any sense to describe rebases as ‘dangerous’, nor to say that you want to present a palatable change log without rewriting history unless you’re saying you want the VCS to help you write nicer history in the first place?

                  1. 2

                    Rebase is not dangerous. You have the reflog to get back to any past state if needed, you can rewrite as much as you need without losing anything.

                    Now, I see only two ways of presenting a palatable change log: either you are able to write it perfectly the first time, or you are able to correct it. I don’t see how any VCS would allow you to do the first one. If you use a machine to try to present it properly (like it seems fossil strives to do), you will undoubtedly hit limitations, forcing the dev to compose with those limitations to write something readable and meaningful to the rest of the team. I very much prefer direct control into what I want to communicate.

                    1. 2

                      I think whether rebase is dangerous depends on the interface you are using Git with. The best UI for Git is, in my opinion, Magit. And when doing a commit you can choose from a variety of options, one of them being “Instant Fixup”.

                      I often use this when I discover that I missed to check-in a new file with a commit or something like that. It basically adds a commit, does an interactive rebase, reorders the commits so that the fixup-commit is next to the one being fixed and executes the rebase pipeline.

                      There are other similar options for committing and Magit makes this straight-forward. So much, indeed, that I have to look up how to do it manually when using the Git CLI.

                      1. 4

                        I prefer to work offline. Prior to Git I used SVK as frontend for SVN since it allowed offline use. However, once Git was released I quickly jumped ship because of its benefits, i.e. real offline copy of all data, better functionality (for me).

                        In your linked document it states “Never use rebase on public branches” and goes on to list how to use rebase locally. So, yes, using rebase on public branches and force-pushing them is obviously only a last resort when things went wrong (e.g. inadvertently added secrets).

                        Since I work offline, often piling up many commits before pushing them to a repo on the web, I use rebase in cases when unpushed commits need further changes. In my other comment I mentioned as example forgotten files. It doesn’t really make sense to add another commit “Oops, forgotten to add file…” when I just as easily can fixup the wrong commit.

                        So the main reason for using rebase for me is correcting unpushed commits which I can often do because I prefer to work offline, pushing the latest commits only when necessary.

                        1. 2

                          In addition to what @gettalong said, keep in mind the original use-case of git is to make submitting patches on mailing lists easier. When creating a patch series, it’s very common to receive feedback and need to make changes. The only way to do that is to rebase.

                    1. 1

                      I experienced this when the company that I work for, forced us to take 10 days unpaid leave, and I split those days on Fridays and Mondays. So when I was returning to work I had a four days weekend.

                      At first it was hard but then I did the following

                      • I was catching up with the emails first
                      • I was checking if there were any review comments on the issues I was working before
                      • We are using Jira for issue tracking. So for each issue I was working for I had a separate browser window open for the specific issue and tabs related to this issue, so it was quick to start working again for this issue.
                      1. 2

                        Myself I am using Liferea and the rss plugin of evolution.

                        1. 2

                          Great to see Liferea still going. I used it a long time ago c. 2005.

                        1. 1

                          Here is the source code, https://www.coulouris.net/cs_history/em_story/emsource/, for the em editor that is mentioned in the article.

                          1. 2

                            For some reason I can’t get it to render Copenhagen at all, no matter which spelling I try to use. It works with other European cities though.

                            1. 1

                              Also weirdly can’t do Greek cities, but can do all the other European cities I tried.

                              1. 3

                                I was trying Athens in Greece and I am getting only the Athens in the United States.

                                It seems that it uses this search engine for OpenStreetMap data, https://nominatim.openstreetmap.org/. The query for Athens in the search engine, https://nominatim.openstreetmap.org/search?format=json&q=Athens, seems to return as the first result the Greek city, but somehow the results are filtered? I am not sure.

                                1. 2

                                  This is a good pointer, if I look up cities that work (Rome, Amsterdam, Stockholms kommun (the county)), they have a city outline in the search results, whereas the ones that don’t work (Copenhagen, Athens, Stockholm (the city)) have no outline in Nominatim.

                                  1. 1

                                    The code filters the results to only those with osm_type of relation. It looks like it should be updated to work with things that have an osm_type of node as well, but how big a change to the code would be required to do that is unclear to me.

                                    What annoys me about modern Javascript projects is that it’s way harder to modify them live in the website and just see what happens. It should be possible for me to open the console on the linked web page and replace that function with one that allows node as well then just see what happens when I type in ‘Athens’. But to test out a change I’d probably have to clone this repository, compile the code, start a web server… how is this different from a non-web application exactly?

                              1. 2

                                A little bit irrelevant, here is a recent interview of Ted Nelson.

                                1. 12

                                  Is there a native macOS client for Mastodon that isn’t a steaming pile of Electron?

                                  1. 4

                                    All the GUI clients I’m aware of are just web clients, though some are substantially smaller and lighter than the default web interface (ex. https://brutaldon.online/). This is probably because mastodon messages (and probably pleroma & gnu social ones too) contain a constrained set of arbitrary html tags, & processing html fragments in a non-webtech context is a pain. (Luckily, the only ones that actually matter are and and everything else can be completely stripped. There is no formatting or anything.)

                                    There’s a nice command-line client called https://github.com/magicalraccoon/tootstream, & I wrote a console/curses client called https://github.com/enkiv2/misc/blob/master/fern. Both of those are python & use the mastodon.py library. I haven’t tested them heavily on different systems but I figure they should work on any modern-ish unix with a recent-ish python, including OSX.

                                    1. 4

                                      https://mastodon.technology/@brunoph/101650095611618146

                                      This guy is making one. It’s not released yet, but you can follow to be updated.

                                      1. 3

                                        The “masto-” prefix is quite unfortunate. “Mastonaut” sounds like a designation given to some NASA test subject doing trials of the effects of airborne semen in zero-g.

                                        1. 4

                                          The effects of breast milk would be more appropriate (or not, considering how tasteless the analogy is to you):

                                          https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/mastodon

                                          First attested 1813, from the New Latin genus name Mastodon (1806), coined by French naturalist Georges Cuvier, from Ancient Greek μαστός (mastós, “breast”) + ὀδούς (odoús, “tooth”), from the similarity of the mammilloid projections on the crowns of the extinct mammal’s molars.

                                          (my emphasis)

                                          1. 7

                                            As a greek native speaker, when I first heard about mastodon, I thought that it was some kind of gadget for breastfeeding.

                                          2. 1

                                            The other day I was trying to say I love Mastodon by saying I have mastophilia but that just means love of boobies…

                                      1. 1

                                        To the author, the article says

                                        February 24, 2018

                                        I suppose it should be 2019

                                        1. 2

                                          Thanks, fixed :)

                                        1. 10

                                          During discussions about privacy, if someone says that “I have nothing to hide”, I ask him/her to give me the password for their personal email. Until now, none has given me the password.

                                          I started asking this after I heard it from somewhere else but I don’t remember where. I will update this if I find out.

                                          1. 8

                                            I believe it can be attributed to Glenn Greenwald:

                                            Over the last 16 months, as I’ve debated this issue around the world, every single time somebody has said to me, “I don’t really worry about invasions of privacy because I don’t have anything to hide.” I always say the same thing to them. I get out a pen, I write down my email address. I say, “Here’s my email address. What I want you to do when you get home is email me the passwords to all of your email accounts, not just the nice, respectable work one in your name, but all of them, because I want to be able to just troll through what it is you’re doing online, read what I want to read and publish whatever I find interesting. After all, if you’re not a bad person, if you’re doing nothing wrong, you should have nothing to hide.”

                                            (see 04:39).

                                            1. 2

                                              Every time this sort of rebuttal comes up to those with “nothing to hide” will justify their position by stating the difference between you snooping through their stuff and a data brokering company snooping through their stuff (with trust in said broker). Nothing will have changed after pulling this trick out of your sleeve and you will only look silly for even mentioning the P-word.

                                            2. 7

                                              Another thought experiment is asking them if they ever close their blinds/curtains at night. Even if I’m just sitting at my desk, I still like to close the curtains because I don’t like the idea of someone looking at me when I’m at home.

                                              1. 6

                                                Technically, this is a false dichotomy because you are asking for permission to impersonate them as well (ie, send email as them). Still a useful rhetorical device.

                                                1. 5

                                                  It’s good you bring that up given it’s another important point. In digital world, companies that can spy on you can get secrets needed for they or their employees to impersonate you.

                                                  In computer security/privacy, I often give people Krebs’ value of a hacked PC so they understand all the ways attackers might wreck their lives. They start by thinking they’re unimportant to target. I tell them that’s true: most attacks are on random people to control their boxes to do stuff like commit crimes in their name. “Spam, attacks on websites, hosting child pornography… anything they don’t want FBI to trace back to them.” That quoted part gets more of a reaction out of people.

                                              1. 1

                                                Just an FYI for others that have the Disconnect plugin. You might receive the following error

                                                Notebook loading error
                                                There was an error loading this notebook. Ensure that the file is accessible and try again.
                                                
                                                Error loading https://apis.google.com/js/client.js
                                                https://drive.google.com/drive/?action=locate&id=1OUQ7oGmd1mvJ1Qs-sRn69roQY6oOmkiB&authuser=0
                                                
                                                Error loading https://apis.google.com/js/client.js
                                                B/A</f.onerror@https://colab.research.google.com/v2/external/gapi_loader.js:9:415
                                                

                                                Just whitelist the link and it will load the notebook.

                                                1. 20

                                                  On the one hand, the article has moments that make it seem dubiously sourced.

                                                  On the other hand, I’m reminded of a conference I went to years ago where some genius from NSA was harranguing me about the security dangers of non-US born programmers working in US firms or on open source projects. I asked him why he was not more worried about Chinese built motherboards and he refused to believe me that the USA depended on imports of Chinese motherboards.

                                                  1. 21

                                                    “The dangers of non-US born programmers working on open source projects”?

                                                    The spook mentality is something to behold.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      It is well known that Linus is a Russian spy and goes by the name Linyos Torovoltos. :)

                                                      The link above was submitted recently here.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        I recall, from Linus’s autobiography, that he claimed that his parents were fans of the soviet union & until their divorce he was raised as a red-diaper baby. Obviously, that hasn’t made him into a stalinist as an adult, but if somebody wanted to spin it that way more seriously I’m sure they could. (I recall back in the naughts some microsoft fanboys trying to make those claims & paint the whole open source movement with that brush, but I don’t think they were very successful.)

                                                      2. 1

                                                        It was kind of jarring - I am not born in USA either!

                                                        1. 1

                                                          And you come over here with that foreign thinking devising things like RTLinux that jeopardize the profits of domestic, closed-source, RTOS vendors. That’s exactly the kind of thing our non-corrupt, capitalist government was worried about! ;)

                                                      3. 3

                                                        I think I don’t trust this article on its face value at all. Bloomberg could be telling a fake story on the demand of someone who wants to further his agenda against Chinese hardware. Also they might partake in a stock manipulation scheme, it was very effective if that’s the case.

                                                        Going to wait and see what’s happening before I conclude anything from here.

                                                        1. 6

                                                          I really really really doubt it. Bloomberg in particular is financial news, its reporters are constantly seeing how (to quote Matt Levine) Everything Is Shareholder Fraud. Publishing something like this with willful negligance would open them up to soooooo many lawsuits.

                                                          Not to mention that Bloomberg is beholden to basically no one, as an organization. They make huge amounts of money selling their stuff. While Businessweek is being pushed to be more self-sufficient, there’s still a lot of value in them being trustworthy.

                                                          Also making up a story, publishing it in a major outlet, and profiting off of a stock trade afterwards. Oh my god that is a “go directly to jail do not pass go do not collect $200” move, especially if you’re just a journalist and not a multi-billionaire. And these people know it, because they’re the ones reporting on other people doing this kind of thing!

                                                          I’m not saying the story is most definitely right, but it’s a serious outfit.

                                                          1. 4

                                                            Yeah, the idea that either Businessweek itself or the author is fabricating this story is hard to swallow – if they did, then somebody’s making incredibly poor decisions.

                                                            On the other hand, I could absolutely buy the idea that they’ve been fed fabricated evidence. This story exists at the intersection of international relations, espionage, and big business. I can imagine some Angelton-esque character whose paranoia only became pathological after they got in a position of power who suddenly decided that supply chain meddling by chinese intelligence is inevitable & decided to try to trigger an outright ban by orchestrating a high-profile story. (After all, once upon a time our president campaigned on heavily limiting chinese imports, so it’s possible that somebody in intelligence capable of faking convincing-looking Apple & Amazon documentation thought it’d be an easy sell.)

                                                              1. 1

                                                                Author doesn’t seem to mention particular Bloomberg stories that those authors wrote that turned out to be false.

                                                                It’s not outside the realm of possibility but I find it hard to believe that there’s a pattern of a couple authors making stuff up in multiple stories for that outfit – or even reporting stories that end up being wrong due to misleading sources, unless they’ve got damned good excuses. I’ll believe it when I see the stories he’s talking about.

                                                                (BadBIOS is getting mentioned in that thread, but BadBIOS was broken by Ars Technica, right? Anyhow, the whole BadBIOS story was – accurately – reported as “this one researcher thinks this is happening, and other researchers think it’s possible but probably bullshit” in all the coverage I saw. While it was questionably newsworthy, that coverage wasn’t wrong or misleading, unless you only read the headlines – which are almost always wrong & misleading, even in good articles.)

                                                        1. 5

                                                          BSD, Lunix, Debian and Mandrake are all versions of an illegal hacker operation system, invented by a Soviet computer hacker named Linyos Torovoltos, before the Russians lost the Cold War.

                                                          Hahaha

                                                          1. 2

                                                            I lost it when I read Linyos Torovoltos. That’s what made it for me, I had a good laugh.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            FYI here is a video from a writer describing his impressions using emacs.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              A bit irrelevant, I was using htop for a while now, but lately I found glances which gives more information for your system and I am happy with this for now…

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  I’m not familiar with the Life community’s terminology, could someone give a primer?

                                                                    1. 5

                                                                      Well, there is a lobster spaceship

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    I remember playing with Quietnet a long time ago, which you could send messages using ultrasound.

                                                                    I believe Android has the Nearby messages API which

                                                                    uses a combination of Bluetooth, Bluetooth Low Energy, Wi-Fi and near-ultrasonic audio to communicate a unique-in-time pairing code between devices.

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      I was expecting the article to be related with something like Purism, but according to their page, it’s still under development…

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        I came across recently to plan files from John Carmack which are kind of similar to a log book.