Threads for svag

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    It seems that the images are not available there. You can find the images here, https://lemmings-history-8b7adc.ingress-earth.easywp.com/lemmings-pictures/

    Edit: Or there is this link https://lemmings-history-8b7adc.ingress-earth.easywp.com/lemmings-gamehistory/

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      One of the most compelling features of Gorillas is that its source code was fully visible and editable, which invited experimentation, especially for kids at the time.

      I was one of the kids at that time :). Back then it was magically amazing to change something on the source code of gorillas and see the result on the screen…

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        I remember changing the radius of the banana explosions. The game got a lot more exciting with a random radius, so a near miss might let you survive, but a second throw with the same angle probably wouldn’t. Making the radius larger than the screen (which I did by accident) had some interesting effects.

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          So, it’s not a bug, it’s a feature :P

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            I was not aware that you could run MS SQL server on Linux. There is a guide of how to install on various distros here, https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/linux/sql-server-linux-setup?view=sql-server-ver15

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              SQL Server on Linux is a pretty exciting beast. It uses Drawbridge, which is Windows built as a library OS with a thin host layer, so it’s really a Win32 binary running on a really small Windows NT kernel, on top of Linux.

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                  I was aware about the PowerShell, I have read it in several places, but I haven’t heard about the SQL Server. I suppose I might have missed it or Microsoft does not advertise it as other products I suppose.

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                  This comes in super handy in dev because we can do things like snapshot a container with a copy of sql server inside, which is shockingly faster and more reliable than using MS’ own tools to backup and restore copies of data and schema.

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                    I have started doing something similar this year. I create a directory for a specific subject, e.g. java, linux, vim and there I create a markdown file with the note that I want to add. I also have added some of my dotfiles there.

                    I have a directory tree file at the start of the notes which is generated by a tree command. The repository is here, https://github.com/svagionitis/my-notes.

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                      There were some questions before regarding this, see here https://lobste.rs/s/hwhptd/which_atom_rss_reader_do_you_use

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                        It seems the code to do this is from this twitter thread, https://nitter.net/lunasorcery/status/1334519572330909696

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                          I used her gist and did my own weechat logs. As a result, here’s a little repo with a requirement.txt and info on how to easily do your own. Really the python just reads a file of date/time stamps, one-per-line. If you can transform your source data into that then this will Just Work™

                          https://tildegit.org/tomasino/weechat-plot

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                          As I have done embedded development, using 80 columns is ideal because you can develop or make changes easier on the embedded device.

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                            I have found that glances, https://nicolargo.github.io/glances/, gives a nice overview of your system (I/O, network, processes, memory) and I haven’t used htop for a while now.

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                                Unfortunately, the comparison is written in such a clearly biased way that it probably makes fossil sound worse than it is (I mean you wouldn’t need to resort to weasel words and name-calling if fossil was valid alternative whose benefits spoke for themselves .. right?). Why would anyone write like that if their aim is to actually promote fossil?

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                                  The table at the top is distractingly polemic, but the actual body of the essay is reasonable and considers both social and technical factors.

                                  My guess is that author is expecting the audience to nod along with the table before clicking through to the prose; it seems unlikely to be effective for anyone who doesn’t already believe the claims made in the table.

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                                    This is what’s turned me off from even considering using it.

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                                    “Sprawling, incoherent, and inefficient”

                                    Not sure using a biased comparison from the tool author is useful. Even then, the least they could do is use factual language.

                                    This is always something that gripes me reading the recurring fossil evangelism: git criticism is interesting and having a different view should give perspective, but the fossil author always use this kind of language that makes it useless. Git adapts to many kind of teams and workflow. The only thing I take from his comparison is that he never learnt to use it and does not want to.

                                    Now this is also a very valid criticism of git: it is not just a turn-key solution, it needs polish and another system needs to put forth a specific work organization with it. That’s a choice for the project team to make. Fossil wants to impose its own method, which of course gives a more architected, polished, finish, but makes it impossible to use in many teams and projects.

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                                      Maybe they don’t care about widely promoting fossil and just created that page so people stop asking about a comparison?

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                                      One of the main reasons for me for not using Fossil is point 2.7 on that list: “What you should have done vs. What you actually did”. Fossil doesn’t really support history rewrites, so no “rebase” which I use nearly daily.

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                                        This is also a problem with Git. Like you, I use rebase daily to rewrite history, when that was never really my objective; I just want to present a palatable change log before my changes are merged. Whatever happens before that shouldn’t require something as dangerous as a rebase (and force push).

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                                          I don’t think it makes any sense to describe rebases as ‘dangerous’, nor to say that you want to present a palatable change log without rewriting history unless you’re saying you want the VCS to help you write nicer history in the first place?

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                                            Rebase is not dangerous. You have the reflog to get back to any past state if needed, you can rewrite as much as you need without losing anything.

                                            Now, I see only two ways of presenting a palatable change log: either you are able to write it perfectly the first time, or you are able to correct it. I don’t see how any VCS would allow you to do the first one. If you use a machine to try to present it properly (like it seems fossil strives to do), you will undoubtedly hit limitations, forcing the dev to compose with those limitations to write something readable and meaningful to the rest of the team. I very much prefer direct control into what I want to communicate.

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                                              I think whether rebase is dangerous depends on the interface you are using Git with. The best UI for Git is, in my opinion, Magit. And when doing a commit you can choose from a variety of options, one of them being “Instant Fixup”.

                                              I often use this when I discover that I missed to check-in a new file with a commit or something like that. It basically adds a commit, does an interactive rebase, reorders the commits so that the fixup-commit is next to the one being fixed and executes the rebase pipeline.

                                              There are other similar options for committing and Magit makes this straight-forward. So much, indeed, that I have to look up how to do it manually when using the Git CLI.

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                                                I prefer to work offline. Prior to Git I used SVK as frontend for SVN since it allowed offline use. However, once Git was released I quickly jumped ship because of its benefits, i.e. real offline copy of all data, better functionality (for me).

                                                In your linked document it states “Never use rebase on public branches” and goes on to list how to use rebase locally. So, yes, using rebase on public branches and force-pushing them is obviously only a last resort when things went wrong (e.g. inadvertently added secrets).

                                                Since I work offline, often piling up many commits before pushing them to a repo on the web, I use rebase in cases when unpushed commits need further changes. In my other comment I mentioned as example forgotten files. It doesn’t really make sense to add another commit “Oops, forgotten to add file…” when I just as easily can fixup the wrong commit.

                                                So the main reason for using rebase for me is correcting unpushed commits which I can often do because I prefer to work offline, pushing the latest commits only when necessary.

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                                                  In addition to what @gettalong said, keep in mind the original use-case of git is to make submitting patches on mailing lists easier. When creating a patch series, it’s very common to receive feedback and need to make changes. The only way to do that is to rebase.

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                                              I experienced this when the company that I work for, forced us to take 10 days unpaid leave, and I split those days on Fridays and Mondays. So when I was returning to work I had a four days weekend.

                                              At first it was hard but then I did the following

                                              • I was catching up with the emails first
                                              • I was checking if there were any review comments on the issues I was working before
                                              • We are using Jira for issue tracking. So for each issue I was working for I had a separate browser window open for the specific issue and tabs related to this issue, so it was quick to start working again for this issue.
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                                                Myself I am using Liferea and the rss plugin of evolution.

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                                                  Great to see Liferea still going. I used it a long time ago c. 2005.

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                                                  Here is the source code, https://www.coulouris.net/cs_history/em_story/emsource/, for the em editor that is mentioned in the article.

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                                                    For some reason I can’t get it to render Copenhagen at all, no matter which spelling I try to use. It works with other European cities though.

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                                                      Also weirdly can’t do Greek cities, but can do all the other European cities I tried.

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                                                        I was trying Athens in Greece and I am getting only the Athens in the United States.

                                                        It seems that it uses this search engine for OpenStreetMap data, https://nominatim.openstreetmap.org/. The query for Athens in the search engine, https://nominatim.openstreetmap.org/search?format=json&q=Athens, seems to return as the first result the Greek city, but somehow the results are filtered? I am not sure.

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                                                          This is a good pointer, if I look up cities that work (Rome, Amsterdam, Stockholms kommun (the county)), they have a city outline in the search results, whereas the ones that don’t work (Copenhagen, Athens, Stockholm (the city)) have no outline in Nominatim.

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                                                            The code filters the results to only those with osm_type of relation. It looks like it should be updated to work with things that have an osm_type of node as well, but how big a change to the code would be required to do that is unclear to me.

                                                            What annoys me about modern Javascript projects is that it’s way harder to modify them live in the website and just see what happens. It should be possible for me to open the console on the linked web page and replace that function with one that allows node as well then just see what happens when I type in ‘Athens’. But to test out a change I’d probably have to clone this repository, compile the code, start a web server… how is this different from a non-web application exactly?

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                                                        A little bit irrelevant, here is a recent interview of Ted Nelson.

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                                                          Is there a native macOS client for Mastodon that isn’t a steaming pile of Electron?

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                                                            All the GUI clients I’m aware of are just web clients, though some are substantially smaller and lighter than the default web interface (ex. https://brutaldon.online/). This is probably because mastodon messages (and probably pleroma & gnu social ones too) contain a constrained set of arbitrary html tags, & processing html fragments in a non-webtech context is a pain. (Luckily, the only ones that actually matter are and and everything else can be completely stripped. There is no formatting or anything.)

                                                            There’s a nice command-line client called https://github.com/magicalraccoon/tootstream, & I wrote a console/curses client called https://github.com/enkiv2/misc/blob/master/fern. Both of those are python & use the mastodon.py library. I haven’t tested them heavily on different systems but I figure they should work on any modern-ish unix with a recent-ish python, including OSX.

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                                                              https://mastodon.technology/@brunoph/101650095611618146

                                                              This guy is making one. It’s not released yet, but you can follow to be updated.

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                                                                The “masto-” prefix is quite unfortunate. “Mastonaut” sounds like a designation given to some NASA test subject doing trials of the effects of airborne semen in zero-g.

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                                                                  The effects of breast milk would be more appropriate (or not, considering how tasteless the analogy is to you):

                                                                  https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/mastodon

                                                                  First attested 1813, from the New Latin genus name Mastodon (1806), coined by French naturalist Georges Cuvier, from Ancient Greek μαστός (mastós, “breast”) + ὀδούς (odoús, “tooth”), from the similarity of the mammilloid projections on the crowns of the extinct mammal’s molars.

                                                                  (my emphasis)

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                                                                    As a greek native speaker, when I first heard about mastodon, I thought that it was some kind of gadget for breastfeeding.

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                                                                    The other day I was trying to say I love Mastodon by saying I have mastophilia but that just means love of boobies…

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                                                                To the author, the article says

                                                                February 24, 2018

                                                                I suppose it should be 2019

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                                                                  Thanks, fixed :)

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                                                                  During discussions about privacy, if someone says that “I have nothing to hide”, I ask him/her to give me the password for their personal email. Until now, none has given me the password.

                                                                  I started asking this after I heard it from somewhere else but I don’t remember where. I will update this if I find out.

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                                                                    I believe it can be attributed to Glenn Greenwald:

                                                                    Over the last 16 months, as I’ve debated this issue around the world, every single time somebody has said to me, “I don’t really worry about invasions of privacy because I don’t have anything to hide.” I always say the same thing to them. I get out a pen, I write down my email address. I say, “Here’s my email address. What I want you to do when you get home is email me the passwords to all of your email accounts, not just the nice, respectable work one in your name, but all of them, because I want to be able to just troll through what it is you’re doing online, read what I want to read and publish whatever I find interesting. After all, if you’re not a bad person, if you’re doing nothing wrong, you should have nothing to hide.”

                                                                    (see 04:39).

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                                                                      Every time this sort of rebuttal comes up to those with “nothing to hide” will justify their position by stating the difference between you snooping through their stuff and a data brokering company snooping through their stuff (with trust in said broker). Nothing will have changed after pulling this trick out of your sleeve and you will only look silly for even mentioning the P-word.

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                                                                      Another thought experiment is asking them if they ever close their blinds/curtains at night. Even if I’m just sitting at my desk, I still like to close the curtains because I don’t like the idea of someone looking at me when I’m at home.

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                                                                        Technically, this is a false dichotomy because you are asking for permission to impersonate them as well (ie, send email as them). Still a useful rhetorical device.

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                                                                          It’s good you bring that up given it’s another important point. In digital world, companies that can spy on you can get secrets needed for they or their employees to impersonate you.

                                                                          In computer security/privacy, I often give people Krebs’ value of a hacked PC so they understand all the ways attackers might wreck their lives. They start by thinking they’re unimportant to target. I tell them that’s true: most attacks are on random people to control their boxes to do stuff like commit crimes in their name. “Spam, attacks on websites, hosting child pornography… anything they don’t want FBI to trace back to them.” That quoted part gets more of a reaction out of people.