1. 5

    Wow, I hadn’t thought of the huge change automotive is facing. This article makes the point that current fleets sit unused the majority of the time, but a properly implemented self-driving fleet will be in use nearly 100% of the time. That’s a big change in the needs of the parts.

    I live in a cold climate and parts for automotive need to withstand -40 (both C and F, they’re the same). I wonder if we’ll see vehicles that aren’t designed for this because they’ll be in use all the time and won’t sit still long enough to get that cold. Of course now that I think of it, this would not really adversely affect the ICs (topic of this submission), more the mechanical and specialized parts (LCD displays, etc).

    1. 4

      While the cold wouldn’t adversely effect the ICs in the long term, if they get cold enough, they’ll temporarily stop working as the electron occupancy of the valence bands drops. Practically, this means that your car computer will fail to boot if it gets too cold.

      Which, I guess, is a long winded way of saying that the design constraints don’t change much for the electronics.

      1. 3

        At sufficiently high doping, it becomes basically impossible to freeze out the dopants, because a Mott band forms. Essentially, the dopant radiuses begin to overlap, forming a partially filled conduction band.

        CMOS chips run just fine at 77K.

    1. 2

      This feels like the future from Accelerando by Charles Stross

      1. 4

        The first time I heard of the Basilisk was on Stross’ blog:

        www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2013/02/rokos-basilisk-wants-you.html

      1. 4

        To be honest hard copies are not in a much better shape.

        Do you have copies of your essays from middle school anymore? So many documents will just fall by the wayside. There are mystery novels from the 50s where basically the only way I could find to get a copy is to buy the French translation of them. I bet a lot of radio disappeared.

        I remember reading an essay about the obsession with having everything permanently stored, forever. I’m starting to question the inherent value of this mentality, because I definitely don’t apply it to the physical world.

        But… there’s a lot of things out there that people do want to keep forever, and it would be good to have a nice answer to it beyond Internet Archive

        1. 3

          Information is only valuable if it can be accessed and used. The mechanism for this in print is the library system. In fact, making the information available and accessible is a career: Library Science.

          I look at print as a different way that humans can access information. It’s a distractionless delivery system that helps a reader remember items with location based cues – you remember where you were reading a good book, and you may remember what part of the page or how far into the book you came across an idea.

          So maybe not better, but different and there’s definitely value in that.

        1. 24

          If you want to take it to the extreme, you can build a website that fits in a single TCP packet.

          Source: https://github.com/diracdeltas/FastestWebsiteEver

          Demo: http://packet.city/

          1. 12

            “Get in touch today to hear about our 120-byte ad sponsorship opportunities!”

            Amazing :D

            1. 4

              Ok, that’s totally awesome. Tops my idea by far!

              1. 2

                Of course there’s sound on that page too. BBS advertising at its best.

              1. 4

                Note this article is from August, and I really haven’t seen anything come of this, although I may have missed something.

                1. 2

                  Yeah, I haven’t heard anything new since we published this. Also linked in that article is the 2016 Black hat talk which (at least for me) was a really good SEP primer:

                  https://youtu.be/7UNeUT_sRos

                1. 7

                  I had no idea TeX was invented to typeset his book but of course it makes sense that a programming text would be the impetus. Neat!

                  1. 5

                    Happy to be of assistance! (I’m the author)

                  1. 1

                    Limit yourself to three tabs open at any given time. Then you will only have open what you really need and will think twice about going down the rabbit hole of distraction.

                    1. 5

                      I love this assertion: “likely been used to raise more money than any other tool in history”

                      This is a spectacular article. The back story or it taking over military presentations is something I had never heard of or considered. Naively I also never thought about what it replaced… thinking back to my grade school days I vividly remember overhead transparencies and of course those went away as soon as this became available.

                      For my own part I’ve been Linux-only for about a dozen years now. I had used LibreOffice for slideshows but have of late been using Google Slides. I’ve seen a few talks where I know people are using Linux machines and using something else. Can anyone shed some light on other FOSS presentation software I might try?

                      1. 3

                        I always use S5 – it’s not the same kind of tool, but the result is similar :)

                        I know profs usually use LaTeX (well, compiled to PDF)

                        1. 1

                          For quick and dirty presentations with little fanfare, I’ve used sent. As with most suckless.org tools, it definitely lives up to the standard of “do one thing.” (I’m not sure about the “do it well” part, though :) )

                          1. 1

                            For presentation part, some people use Impressive once they have a PDF to present (or a set of images). I guess some people like Suckless sent (which presents plaint-text files and can also show an image instead of a slide).

                            To create the presentation PDF, those who use LaTeX for other needs often use the beamer package.

                          1. 1

                            My biggest question on this is whether or not the TOTP key database is hashed with the user passwords. Does anyone know? Elliot’s assertion is that these cannot be hashed but if you’re already running the user password hash why not run the same hash to expose the TOTP key? Of course that means the unhashed TOTP will remain in the clear while waiting for the user to input the 2FA value (or else user would need to reenter password if you miss the 2FA window). Anyone have experience with this?

                            1. 2

                              2FA only really matters if your password is already owned. So if you’re deriving the TOTP secret from the password, it’s not much better than storing it in the clear, right?

                              1. 1

                                Silly me, of course that’s the case. Thanks!