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    Elation Health is hiring.

    We’re a smallish co in SF building EHR (and other) systems for independent primary care physicians.

    We’re hybrid remote/onsite. Most of our remote people are in North American timezones.

    Eng Lead: https://www.elationhealth.com/careers?gh_jid=1172268 (Preferably onsite).

    Eng: https://www.elationhealth.com/careers?gh_jid=714360

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      I inquired a bit earlier (actually last year, as well) would you mind if I PMed you about the engineering position?

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        Go ahead! (I’m less than a year there).

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      China Mieville Kraken. Started fun, but has become a bit of a slog.

      Inventive character concepts, but boring characters.

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        Not his best book, yeah. The City and The City is the best, if you haven’t read it.

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          Kraken is pretty much Neverwhere, but by China Miéville. If you liked the concept but not the characters, you might prefer Neverwhere (there will be no surprises in it, though, Kraken basically spoils most of Neverwhere).

          Miéville’s less-derivative books are better. @itamarst recommended The City & the City, which is excellent; in true good sci-fi form, it takes a kind of weird concept and explores it to the limit (though it’s more exploring sociological than technological concepts). I’ll also recommend Embassytown (similarly takes a weird concept and runs with it) and Railsea (which is just fun and kind of silly).

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            Kraken felt more to me like China Mieville’s American Gods. The Neverwhere analogue IMO is Un Lun Dun, which is both short and really good. Mieville gets to throw every idea he has into one book without having to worry about inconsistencies or torturing his characters or talking ‘bout socialism, and it’s absolutely delightful.

            When recommending Mieville I usually recommend TC&TC or ULD, because they’re both really approachable and are on opposite ends of his Weird Fiction spectrum: one is about taking a single idea and going as far as possible with it, the other just seeing what he’ll come up with next.

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              I’ve never read Un Lun Dun, I think mostly because I tend to not like short books :/ Agreed The City & The City is probably a good book to read for folks who haven’t built up a tolerance to Mieville. My personal favorite of his though is The Scar.

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          REAMDE by Neal Stephenson. He left such a foul taste in my mouth after seveneves that I am relieved that this seems, so far, a lot more like Cryptonomicon.

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            I thought reamde started off really strong but unfortunately there wasn’t a good payoff in the end.

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              That’s basically every book by Stephenson.

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                I dunno, I will never forget the last bit of Cryptonomicon, personally. Would love to see that in mini-series form

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              Hmm, I loved seveneves. Currently on Snow Crash.

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                Neal Stephenson’s prose can be pretentious at times. Is that what you found in seveneves?

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                  3/4 of the book was in current time or in the very near future and on or around Earth, then the last 1/4 of the book was a completely different story in a different time and place. I think many people found it very jarring. The only connection between the two stories is that the events of the first one had a profound effect leading to the second one. The second story was also difficult to get into, because 800 pages into a book is not when you want to be reading a ton of exposition and being introduced to new characters.

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                  REAMDE is really fun and full of Stephenson’s trademark tangents, but I wouldn’t classify it as sci fi (which was a bit unexpected for me).

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                    Also reading this right now. I’m really enjoying it!

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                      Several of the characters from REAMDE have stuck in my mind. Interesting book and a good departure for Stephenson.

                      First half of seveneves was fun, last part, as often with him, regrettable.

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                        I completely agree about seveneves. It was like two books for me. One of which was quite good and the other an interesting concept for a setting for a different story, but unfortunately not compelling enough to draw me into the plot or characters.

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                      It’s an interesting read, but it left me with one question - when would an engineer need to ssh to a Facebook production system? I can understand for troubleshooting purposes, but surely an unprivileged user would make more sense then, rather than using a local root user?

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                        I wouldn’t be surprised if Facebook is to the point where the scale of just their operations team required something like this. However, I would never have people ssh in as root, you lose the audit trail that way. Instead, people should SSH in as themselves and sudo or doas for privileged access.

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                          Doesn’t this maintain the audit trail as each user is given a unique serial?

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                            Only if that is logged somewhere when the certificate is used to login.

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                            The article claims to use logging based on the cert to identify the person rather than having each person map to a local user.

                            At a certain number of users it becomes frustrating to maintain local users across a large number of machines. Facebook is certainly above that number of users.

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                          Just finished Joshua Cohen’s Book of Numbers. Still forming an opinion about it, but left feeling unimpressed.

                          Was reading ‘A Room of One’s Own’, but just put it down halfway through. A lot more essays should steal it’s conceit of a real fiction making it’s argument rather than using fiction as a quick illustrative device.