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    Work

    • Working with form validation in Vue 3.
    • Meeting with a new client for their new website for travel and event booking.
    • Joining a designsprint to learn more about UX.

    Home

    Converting the last of my Jekyll-websites to Zola. (I really enjoy the single binary life)

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      You should really include adding push URLs to a repo’s default remote: https://stackoverflow.com/a/14290145/317670

      The best backups are the ones that happen automatically in the future.

      Add one for GitHub, one for sr.ht, and one for a local NAS or ssh server. Now, whenever you push, you have two remote services and a local service storing it. The local NAS can be a single raspberry pi with the default 8GB SD card for most people.

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        This is a good solution, but on the one repo I used it with I switched to a different setup. I now use a local gitea to pull from sr.ht and push that same repo to GitHub, with my origin only pushing to sr.ht.

        I’ve been meaning to give this a try, just haven’t found the time yet: https://github.com/cooperspencer/gickup

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          That is actually very cool. I had no idea! I will update the article ASAP to include this :)

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            I was not aware of this, thanks!

            I’ve been using multiple remotes for my repos and I setup a git alias in my .gitconfig for pusing to all remotes at once;

            pa = !git remote | xargs -L1 git push # Push to all remotes
            

            Maybe it’s time to start using pushurl.

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              Why do you need xargs here at all? Just add more remote urls to the same remote name and then git push remote –all. Programmers seem to love to overcomplicate this stuff with layers that aren’t needed.

              git remote set-url –add remote some/url

              Also setup backups, this remote nonsense won’t do jack for not yet committed stashes or changes.

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                That’s what’s in the link. I should have done a tldr in my comment…

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                  Hehe, that’s what I meant by

                  Maybe it’s time to start using pushurl.

                  I’m in the process of starting to use this style instead :)

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              Spending my vacation days configuring my home network with a Wireguard VPN. I had setup my home network with just simple port-forwarding, which has not been ideal in terms of security, having my public IP exposed with a handful of open ports. Now that’s about to change.

              Hopefully I also get a chance to continue my Ansible playbooks as well. Really blown away how great Ansible is!

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                I’m glad that some of these tips have now been automated, in most cases. For example

                • #3; this is usually handeled by the IDE/editor
                • #4; this can be handeled by Prettier or some other CI and/or compiling tools. Which makes it easier for the maintainer to process PRs.
                • #5; on GitHub and many other git-repo hosting providers they provide automatic builds CI/CD pipelines which also can build when a PR is submitted.
                • #6; the same as #5 really, in the same procedure you can also see if all tests ran successfully.

                As for the last 4 tips, they are really quite useful. I know a lot of people, myself included, could create a lot more tests and probably document our reasoning quite a bit more.

                Modern development flows have come a long way in the recent years and I’m all for it!

                Sidenote: I really love that the author has replied to a comment made not so long ago with the excellent advice from Kent Beck;

                For each desired change, make the change easy, then make the easy change.

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                  It would be amazing if they added a proper conversation view! Although a pretty nice update.

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                    Have you tested the extension on M1 Mac’s? (Might just be the case of the App Store version) I have enabled all of the redirects and it does not work google.com, translate.google.com, youtube.com, maps.google.com nor reddit.com(or old.reddit.com). Only one that works is Twitter. Opened an issue.

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                      I know this is intended for non-technical users, but for technical users I think such a feature should be client-side rather than another layer in the email process. Especially since that probably breaks encryption and/or sender verification. (…if you even care about such things when handing out your email to marketers.)

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                        Agreed. Also, non-technical users would have to trust DDG to not read/parse the emails anymore than that they remove the tracking which can be achieved by disabling remote content when looking at the email.

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                        Something like this could be incorporated into mostly everything, couldn’t it? But then again it could have a negative effect, for example if numpy were to use such a license, it could halt further development because some of the users/companies that use it also contribute with bugfixes and more features. If they cannot use it, they would most likely not contribute any code.

                        And also, isn’t this a bit too much:

                        aid in the exploration …

                        I know geologists need to look for fossil fuels in order to see how the bedrock is being formed and kept together etc. So that might be something to look into, nevertheless this looks interesting! :)

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                          I really hope that they can keep their name regardless of the current “vote for a new name” thing going on. They’ve been going strong for a few years, and I believe most privacy consisous people know about them by now and are visting their site frequently to see if there are anything new to learn more about.