1. 3

    Great to see the tmux votes here. Changed my computer life too, also for the better.

    Day to day I use OSX and Terminal.app with basically tmux, bash, vim, git. I use homebrew for any other libraries or tools needed; I was loyal to MacPorts for ages but eventually realised it was just too painful and brew is so much easier, neater and less prone to requiring a 13th install of some obscure Perl version.

    I try to learn the default configurations of pretty much any app I use so that I never have to freak out because I’m on some unfamiliar computer and the mappings aren’t what I’m used to. Recently I’ve been getting heavily into using all the emacs bindings in bash, to the extent of ^H for backspace, ^M for enter and ^R/^P/^N for history instead of arrow keys, simply to avoid moving my hands too much.

    At work I email in alpine & Gmail, browse the web in Chrome, and any code I write is most likely Javascript against Python on App Engine. At home I use Safari for web and email in Mail.app; for personal/side projects I write JS for Chrome/Canary against Chicago Boss (erlang) & Tokyo Tyrant. Not that I’m particularly good at erlang, I’m not, though I’m learning - but even then CB makes integrating websockets into MVC web apps a total breeze.

    1. 5

      ^R for bck-i-search was a game changer for me. I will often follow my very complex terminal commands with a comment, just so I can ^R for them, like:

      git log | grep -B1 ‘Author: MyGitName’ | grep commit | awk ‘{print $2}’ | xargs git show | grep -E “^(+|-)\s” | awk ‘{print $1}’ | sort -rn | uniq -c # TOTAL_PLUS_MINUS

      1. 2

        Never thought of the comment at the end. Thanks!