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      I wish there was a comparison between this and zsh-syntax-highlighting and why one might want to change.

      1. 1

        Well the comparison would be a superset: fizsh includes zsh-syntax-highlighting and zsh-history-substring-search, all 3 projects part of the zsh-users group.

      1. 2

        This is interesrting, but I’m seeing / hearing SO much more lately about Clang, I wonder where GCC’s future lies.

        1. 13

          GCC isn’t going anywhere as it supports a wide range of platforms and targets that are not the focus of Clang, among other reasons.

          1. 7

            GCC also still produces faster code in most cases.

            1. 4

              That has been my experience with ldc2 vs gdc: better optimisation in gdc for the cases I cared about.

              1. 2

                Then why are the Linux kernel and some other projects switching to Clang? (Honest, stupid question. I’m WAY rusty on the C world :)

                1. 11

                  Great question! But Linux actually isn’t, sort of. Most Linux distros still ship with gcc-compiled Linux, except Android. I don’t know exactly why Android switched, but I wouldn’t be surprised if clang works better when compiling to ARM, since Apple built clang to compile iOS.

                  Linux has loads of reasons to compile with clang, even if the releases are still gcc-compiled. Just checking the warnings clang produces to compare with gcc provides a lot of value. But clang is more than a compiler, it’s a “set of reusable C++ libraries for building powerful source-level tools”, like the clang static analyzer. YouCompleteMe, the popular vim plugin does semantic code completion using libclang. So making Linux compile on clang opens up a lot of opportunities to use different tooling.

                  Building Linux with a different compiler has other advantages too, even if that compiler wasn’t clang. Compiling on multiple C compilers helps suss out obscure undefined or implementation-defined behavior bugs, or even compiler bugs! I don’t have an references on hand but the Linux on clang effort has found incorrect Linux code that happened to work due to one or more gcc bugs. There is an alternative rust compiler written in C++, mrustc that partially exists for this same reason.

                  Historically Linux has been gcc-only because it relies on lots of gcc features and extensions. Compiling with a totally different toolchain like MSVC is just a non-starter. Porting to clang has actually been viable because clang aims to be mostly gcc compatible, from compiler flags to special syntaxes to builtins, even down to many implementation-defined behaviors.

                  Lastly, getting Linux to compile with clang keeps the option of switching open. Linux might switch to clang one day if clang produces faster code than gcc on amd64. It’s not like Linux could switch overnight, it’s taken years of hard work to get this far. Android made the switch only recently. And even if most Linux distros did switch to building with clang, gcc would still be supported by Linux for many of these same reasons, in addition to gcc supporting many architecture targets that clang doesn’t (as mentioned by @trn).

                  1. 3

                    I get it! So it’s more like Clang is a new, interesting toolchain that it makes sense to support because being compatible means people can use it for a variety of interesting analysis and optimization projects.

                    Thanks!

                    1. 3

                      https://groups.google.com/a/chromium.org/d/msg/chromium-dev/bIWc8vFMF-w/wfMJsNHvDAAJ lists why the Chromium team pushed to get Chromium to compile with Clang on Windows. I forget how much overlap there is with reasons to favor Clang over GCC (having an open-source compiler certainly doesn’t apply there).

                  2. 5

                    FWIW aren’t many projects like Linux aiming for compatibility with Clang and to build with both, rather than a complete switch-over?

                    1. 4

                      No one else has seemed to mention licensing. I’ve always felt Clang was a response to the GPL licensing around gcc. After all, Apple has slowly been removing as much GPL code as possible from MacOS.

                      1. 4

                        clang in my book is predominantly the response to GCC not wanting to modularise their system. Apple has issues with the GPL, but I would expect that to be more of a nice addon for them.

                        (See https://lwn.net/Articles/582697/ for background)

                        1. 0

                          I sometimes wonder if the world would be a better place if we all just agreed that GPL-ish licenses were overly restrictive and counter productive and that BSD/MIT-ish licenses were Good Enough.

                        2. 2

                          Among other things, Clang has a lot of great security features like (Cross-DSO) Control Flow Integrity. Android is using CFI for their version of the Linux kernel already.

                          Also, clang (well, any LLVM-backed compiler) is always a cross-compiler (and LLD is always a cross-linker), so you can completely avoid the nightmare of toolchain management (x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu-gcc-omgwtf)

                          1. 1

                            Yeah, building cross compliation toolchains is a PITA to say the least.

                  1. 3

                    I tried this out a few years ago and found it about as useful as using grep to search the internet. Anything with the word you are searching will be shown in a seemingly random order. Makes it impossible to search even basic stuff like youtube.

                    1. 1

                      Unfortunately, YouTube searching is one of the more complex examples of search imaginable.

                      The YouTube search takes into account all sorts of metadata and information that is not easily gleaned from just crawling the pages and indexing the text.

                      1. 2

                        No I mean I just typed “youtube” and the first page was a bunch of Russian blogs. “youtube.com” was nowhere to be found.

                        1. 1

                          Probably because nobody had bothered trying to crawl/scrape/index YouTube.com yet, for precisely the reasons mentioned - however, I believe if it was it would rank highly because of a default boost that is applied due to matching both the domain name and the title.

                          However, I’d have to look, but YouTube likely wouldn’t be indexed at all because of the robots.txt which YaCy respects by default.

                          1. 2

                            If its true that index page for the second biggest website in existence has not been crawled yet then there is no hope at all for actually searching something. No I can’t just manually start crawling websites before I search them because if I knew the website I wouldn’t have to search for it.

                            That robots txt does not blog the index page and it looks like it blocks nothing important at all. Just the usual non useful pages for search.

                    1. 2

                      So after reading all of the other comments so far the question for me remains: How should one configure this to get roughly the equivalent of any other search engine?

                      1. 1

                        It depends on an instance administrator adjusting ranking rules for your specific content - there are ways to configure boosting based on programmable criteria and “negative boosting” for the content you have indexed in your instance.

                        As a global search engine, you are at the mercy of others having done this to get good results - if you they haven’t, then you can.

                        There is no central authority that can censor, promote, or demote content.

                        This model works particularly well for curated instances, but will likely be lacking as a global search engine until a decent chunk of the Internet-using population start to run and manage instances.

                      1. 2

                        We are using YaCy for the search on BAN.AI with decent results - but it does require configuration and tuning.

                        1. 4

                          Yeah, the metaphor here is totally lost on me.

                          Squirrel is far more than the chicken of the trees - it’s quite plainly the best meat there is, and my favorite dish next to lamb.

                          I make a recipe similar to this one often. Just looking at those pictures makes me hungry!

                          Somehow this completely ruined the article, because for me (and everyone else I know), squirrel is absolutely delicious!

                          1. 4

                            Despite the title, the issue with the burger in the article is not so much that it’s a squirrel burger, but that it’s roadkill of unknown freshness.

                            For me, the part where the analogy breaks down is when the customer/manager, having eaten the roadkill burger, comes back to the person who supplied it and expects them to produce burgers of known and socially acceptable origin for the same price. Maybe the conclusion shouldn’t be, “don’t serve your boss squirrel burgers”, but “if you serve your boss squirrel burgers and they come back for more, you need to find a better boss…”. However, you can’t make a career out of successfully identifying good managers by getting them to fire you for low quality work, so that brings us back to “don’t serve your boss squirrel burgers”, but for different reasons to those in the article.

                            1. 1

                              Squirrels are more like rats than they are chicken. Their good reputation is due to their fluffy tails but them eating not only seeds is often overlooked.

                              1. 1

                                I’m sure their diet has something to do with the quality of the meat.

                            1. 14

                              This looks great, but is the approach of “try this command over and over” dangerous for pipelines that may contain “non-idempotent” operations?

                              Specifically, and for example, I use the “perl -pi.bak -e …stuff… filename.glob “ pattern often, to search-and-replace text in files, and while figuring out the regex to use in there, I think this would try over and over, … and if my filename.glob was too broad (i use “*” too often), my directory would quickly fill up with files like filename.bak.bak.bak.bak.bak.

                              I realize I’ll probably get a “don’t do that, then” comments… but isn’t there a case where you’d want to have a “don’t ‘hit return’, until the user signals that it’s ok to make an attempt to execute? Does this already exist in there and I missed it?

                              1. 3

                                Who am I to tell anyone “don’t do”! :)

                                Actually, my initial idea was in fact to have such a “run/pause” feature. But then I thought I could maybe take a risk and go without it? It could even work! :) So it’s certainly not alien to me; however, I’m also not very sure now: would it then bring enough value over just writing the stuff on a normal shell prompt? What do you think? I’m genuinely curious; I’m deep enough in the trenches now, that I’ve already lost some end-user perspective, so your input would be very valuable to me here and now. Also, and maybe especially: would you think the -i.bak option would make any sense with the pause/run feature? Given that you would probably want to pause-run more than once anyway, so you might still get some .bak.bak.baks?… or do I not see something?… This is certainly interesting…

                                1. 3

                                  original commenter here: I was thinking about this some more, and I bet you can get tricky using capabilities(7) or other containment mechanisms (on Linux, at least) to render the filesystem upon which you’re noodling to be immutable.

                                  1. 2

                                    Oh, wow; now that would be seriously amazing hack if it works… Thank you good sir for the idea, it totally made my eyes wide open… I wonder if it’s really possible, and how much work it would require…

                                    1. 2

                                      A more complex project to write, but perhaps a FUSE driver that act as writable snapshot overlay which doesn’t commit to disk. write / unlink “works” but only affects virtual filesystem nodes.

                                2. 2

                                  Yeah, you’d need to be especially careful with find -exec or xargs when the operation might involve copying/modifying/deleting files.

                                1. 5

                                  Various improvements to BAN.AI — bringing up Lisp LOGO, diagnosing an FNP channel wedge, cleaning up a few weak points in the mail gateway … and a lot of other little tasks!

                                  1. 3

                                    Hopefully someone can recommend the right tool for the job for me here for one of the many items on the BAN.AI TODO list.

                                    BAN.AI has a search engine which searches our large collection of Multics reports and documents.

                                    I have a few thousand PDF files totaling ~12GB, many of which do not have any OCR’d text layer, and thus not fully indexed.

                                    I’m looking for the easiest solution to pragmatically OCR these documents and merge the resulting text layer back into the PDF files, which would lead to an immediate improvement in search results.

                                    Edit: Fixed link.

                                    1. 2

                                      You can do it using GhostScript and Tesseract. Tesseract can’t read PDF, but according to its FAQ it can output them.

                                      It’d be something like this:

                                      mkdir pages
                                      gs -SDEVICE=tiffg4 -r720x720 -sOutputFile="./pages/page-%04d.tiff" -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH -- $INPUT_PDF
                                      ls pages/*.tiff | sort > pages.txt
                                      tesseract pages.txt $OUTPUT_PDF pdf
                                      
                                      1. 2

                                        Cool, thank you, I’ll have to play with it and see what I can come up with.

                                        1. 2

                                          Thanks again, the suggestion helped me very much, and sent me in the right direction. I ended up modyifing a script that uses similar workflow, and using pdftk to put the text back into the original PDF.

                                          It looks like it’s going to take a long time to complete. So far it’s only been averaging ~1.5 documents per hour.

                                  1. 5

                                    While I’m a socat fanatic, I fully agree the OpenBSD base system code is, in almost all cases, going to give you an example of clean, well-written, simple (where possible), and correct code.

                                    1. 5

                                      …and I assume [1] these encrypted backups are safe from the eyes of all those TLA’s [2] which are so keen on ‘total information awareness’ and such?

                                      Right.

                                      [1] …which makes an ass out of you and me

                                      [2] an acronym for ‘three letter acronyms [3]’

                                      [3] No Such Agency (trust me)

                                      1. 6

                                        There was a time I might have thought nothing of this but given the size of the Android market and bigG being bigG, there is no way this is just a cool feature for their users. It must have some economical value (other than marketing) for setting up such an infrastructure would be only a money sink, which doesn’t usually bode well with shareholders.

                                        1. 2

                                          I have to agree.

                                          Call me cynical, but the fact they are doing this for free and encouraging you to use it just further convinces me to avoid it at all costs.

                                      1. 5

                                        Taking Daughter The First to see Australian sensations, The Wiggles; then, apple picking with the whole family on Sunday.

                                        1. 3

                                          This is the best weekend plans posted so far.

                                          I wish more people in the IT industry, including most tech enthusiasts, would spend more time with real people - friends and family - than with machines.

                                          Maybe they do but just don’t mention it? Probably not; I feel like if they did, various community issues could be avoided.

                                          1. 6

                                            This is the best weekend plans posted so far.

                                            You obviously haven’t seen The Wiggles.

                                            1. 1

                                              I wish more people in the IT industry, including most tech enthusiasts, would spend more time with real people - friends and family - than with machines.

                                              That’s how it goes when you don’t have friends and family doesn’t live in town.

                                          1. 3

                                            I had these exact same headphones as a warranty replacement for the previous pair that failed after 2 years. They refused to replace them this time. A $14 pair of AUkey headphones are nearly as good to me, although I’ll admit years of being an audio engineer have probably affected my hearing somewhat; I still appear to have quite good ears according to hearing tests. I have some nice studio headphones when I really need to hear clearly, and it turns out my use case for earbuds overrides the need for superior fidelity. Are the $14 buds as nice? Of course not, but sometimes good enough is good enough.

                                            Jaybird will never get another cent from me, and their parent company Logitech is now worthy of my scrutiny.

                                            1. 2

                                              $14 bluetooth buds?

                                              1. 5

                                                There is no correlation between headphone frequency response and retail price, the consumer and especially the audiophile HiFi market is full marketing voodoo. The main difference between cheap and expensive headphones is the material the case is made of but the built-in drivers are usually pretty cheap and the construction of good headphones is no rocket science, even though the audio industry wants you think that. I also own a cheap pair of bluetooth in-ear headphones for commuting that cost me 20€ and are pretty reliable and sound pretty okay. I forgot them once in a pocket of my jeans and they even survived the washing machine. Another anecdote regarding relation between price and audio reproduction quality of headphones: I was looking for headphones for my home recording studio this year and tested difference models ranging from Samson SR850 for 27€ to Beyerdynamic DT-880 for around 200€. In the end I went with the Samsons’ because they sound fantastic and I can live with a non perfect case finish, heck, you can even get a pair of them for 39€.

                                                1. 1

                                                  I don’t disagree about marketing voodoo in HiFi space, there is astonishingly good cheap gear, KSC75s possibly being the most striking example. That said, adding a mic and BT to them will cost you about $14 ($11 BT chip, $3 mic, straight from China) by itself with a so-so BT chip which doens’t license the high quality audio stream stuff and will randomly fail to pair.

                                                  The SR850s are exceptional, like the KSC75s, Zero Audio Tenore’s and a handful of other great drivers, so-so build quality but no core build defects.

                                                  EDIT: Update from the OP, it was $27, which makes A LOT more sense to me.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    I’ve been exactly there and I ended up with BD DT-770’s, which sound great but are ultimately comfortable to wear for extended periods without clamping my head or causing inner-ear pain. Were I tracking a kit I’d probably use the Sennheiser hd-280pro’s due to the superior bleed isolation but man those things kill my ears after a couple hours. What that tells me is that inside, the tech provides modest differences and it’s all about comfort and durability.

                                                    At the end of the day, much of the music most people consume is rammed through lossy compression and mixed to maximize volume, then rammed through a cheap DAC - so listening through a $1000 pair of headphones provides little benefit other than to point out the flaws in the recording all along the process.

                                                    1. 4

                                                      At the end of the day, much of the music most people consume is rammed through lossy compression

                                                      Most modern static compression is well beyond good enough even for high end gear. Note: static compression, not on the fly compression like BT does.

                                                      and mixed to maximize volume

                                                      The loudness wars left a lot of damaged music. But it is all but over at this point. Everyone from indie artists to professional mastering have stopped it as a matter of course, and it is now the exception. Mick Guzauski, Bob Ludwig and Ian Shepherd since the mid-2000s really pushed against it changing the industry. iTunes Radio really cemented it with automatically tuning down overly loud music, meaning if the copy they get from you is part of the loudness wars it is going to sound objectively horrible.

                                                      then rammed through a cheap DAC -

                                                      $3 DACs are all but perfect at this point, a lot of the difference between a $3 and $30 DAC is bit-rates used for professional mastering and its shielding. Finding an awful DAC these days takes real effort.

                                                      so listening through a $1000 pair of headphones provides little benefit other than to point out the flaws in the recording all along the process.

                                                      Really depends on the headphones, some very much show the flaws, others are just expensive and fun. Also, there is something sort of special about finding new depth in recordings through high end gear, tapping of a foot, the side mic exhale, etc. I would say like the TH900s are a nice pure-fun high end headphone: 25ohm, v-shaped, pretty to look at.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        thanks for the clarity; I agree with the that there is the possibility to renew appreciation in old favorites by changing the listening environment. Having donned the primo grados at a high-end mastering house, I am a believer.

                                                      2. 3

                                                        …mixed to maximize volume…

                                                        This is more a matter of taste than a sound quality problem, and yes, the loudness war caused popular music to be less dynamic because loud = good.

                                                        …rammed through a cheap DAC…

                                                        I will not deny that there are differences between a good DAC used in a professional audio interfaces and those used in a cheap laptop but even the latter ones are good now (except the one of the Raspberry Pi), but the distortion caused by a cheap DAC is orders of magnitude’s lower than that of any loudspeaker. The mechinal part of reproduction is still the weak point, by far.

                                                        Monty Montgomery from xiph.org (the ogg vorbis guys) made an enlightening video about D/A and A/D conversion which I can highly recommend to anyone.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          All the HD-280s I have even seen or owned died the same sad death – headband death. Either the metal strains against the plastic and breaks it, or the strain goes to the metal connect and it snaps, either way hard to repair.

                                                          Also, they make a great set of earmuffs.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            At the end of the day, much of the music most people consume is rammed through lossy compression and mixed to maximize volume, then rammed through a cheap DAC - so listening through a $1000 pair of headphones provides little benefit other than to point out the flaws in the recording all along the process.

                                                            Dunno about that. I really enjoy my AKG K812 even if plugged straight in to a laptop (most of the time) or phone (sometimes). I also enjoy my Sennheiser HD 800 even if the amp that feeds them gets analog input straight from the motherboard. Yes, it can get a little noisy when the GPU is busy. I enjoy them both, generally more than my Sennheiser HD 650, even if I’m streaming lossy music from Youtube. Or music I compressed myself at a bitrate I know is transparent (or damn well close enough) from the ABXing I’ve done in the past. If anything, I feel like the AKG K701 (cheapest cans I have right now) are more revealing in terms of recording flaws.

                                                            I really don’t think the DAC and compression are a big deal, even if I do also have a collection lossy music and an external head amp.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              I think it comes down to design intent for the cans in question - e.g. listening vs. mixing, and I do agree that technology has vastly improved since I last posted a diatribe about this. I think there’s also a matter of ear training here that affects me, as it’s not just headphone use where I hear every razzafrazzin sound in the room. I spent years developing critical listening skills and I can’t just turn them off.

                                                          2. 1

                                                            While I won’t argue the point of sound quality right now (because it’s all over the map), I certainly will argue about build quality.

                                                            I’d be willing to bet that a much larger percentage of gear priced at $200 and above will be around in 15 years, vs. lower priced gear.

                                                            The higher-end gear might not always be technically and sonically superior but it is usually built to a higher standard of quality.

                                                          3. 1

                                                            Oops, I fibbed, they were $26.99: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06ZZSQQTD/

                                                            I’m one of those “excessive research” headphone chaps and I am generally highly critical of any headphones but these right here, they are a winner for me.

                                                            I should note my use cases are: using outdoor power equipment where bigger hearing protection doesn’t fit, using power tools in the shop, and blocking out noise on planes. The one place they fail, which is entirely due to the size, is for sleeping. Plus, more often than not I’m listening to podcasts, audio books, or lo-fi rock & roll where high fidelity or critical listening isn’t a factor.

                                                        1. 4

                                                          I just corrected the intro: it’s an agent-oriented programming language, not just object-oriented. There’s a difference. The AOP model was about moving software to other places with their state self-contained. Of mainstream languages, Tcl and Java applets were considered by a lot of people. Telescript was probably best offering from commercial sector really focused on that. The go command made things easier. However, Obliq was really interesting as well. Built on Modula-3, a safe, systems language.

                                                          1. 3

                                                            About two months ago I posted a General Magic thread – and a comment with interesting links, such as the Telescript documentation.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              I remember when Tcl applets were considered an upcoming next big thing - there was support for running the Tcl applets in the various browsers of the day. I seem to distinctly remember a Netscape plugin for it.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              $180 headphones can’t be expected to last long, IMO.

                                                              On the other hand, I bought my Sennheiser HD-650 headphones back in 2003 or so - albeit for a lot more than $180 - and they are going strong today - but I think I had to repair the cord once. I believe you can get them now for around $200, however.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                I got my HD600 used (in mint condition) for $180, but the HD6XX from Massdrop (which is the same as the HD650 just in dark blue color) go for $200 brand new.

                                                                1. 4

                                                                  Great value in the Sennheister HD-6xx cans! I prefer them to just about everything else.

                                                                  However — the Sony MDR-V6 are actually decent cans on the lower end, they don’t need an amp, and I’ve recommended them to people who don’t want spend the money for better higher-end cans - but, I think the 80’s and early 90’s V6’s are more durable than the current production.

                                                                  I have very little experience with earbuds though, which is what the original poster was talking about. I’ve heard very good things about the AKG N40 — but those are more than double his apparent budget.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    I have fond memory of happy time with the MDR-V6’s, they where my first back in 2012 and then gave them to one of my brothers, they of course are still going on, great value at a decent price.

                                                                    For IEMs I hit the sweet spot with the ER4XR and will look no further, though insertion is a bit tricky. There is also the ER3 line made in China, but with the same specs of the ER4 line, the former go for about $180 brand new, while the latter go for $350, I think it’s worth to try them.

                                                                2. 2

                                                                  Here in Europe, professionnal AKG and Beyerdynamic headphones cost around €100 and last forever. Of course, these sound dead neutral, aren’t bass-heavy at all and don’t look any modern so one might dislike them. You can also found much cheaper clones.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Owners of Sony MDR-7506 and the earlier MDR-V6 would argue with that statement.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    I have been very distrustful of the whole “high end earbuds” thing ever since the fad started.

                                                                    I use two sets of Sennheiser 555 cans I’ve had for over a decade (one for work, one for home) they sound great and will last forever :)

                                                                    For earbuds I mostly use to listen to podcasts I own a set of super cheap $2o chinese bluetooth buds (SoundPeats I think? :) that work great.

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      My HD-650’s are still going strong after 15 years. They can probably be found for $200 today, but cost a lot more than that new.

                                                                      I don’t think you are likely to get or should expect a quality sounding and long lasting set of cans for under $250 in the current market. Everything at that price or under seems to be high-end disposable products.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        Some professional AKG and Beyerdynamic cost about €100 and last forever. Cables and ear cushions are replaceable.

                                                                        Of course, they sound dead neutral and aren’t designed for the average consumer in mind.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          That sounds like exactly what I want. Can you refer me to one of those models so I can buy it?

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            There are the AKG K-271 MKII and the slighly more expensive Beyerdynamic DT-770 Pro and a few others. Be careful with impedance: standard headphones are 32 ohms, 55 ohms works fine on almost any device but 80 ohms might be too high for your use case.

                                                                            1. 3

                                                                              Beyerdynamic DT-770 Pro

                                                                              No replaceable cables on those – but they are built like a tank.

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                Yes and no, it depends on what the meaning of “replaceable” is. Beyerdynamic do sell replacement cables but they have to be soldered.

                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                  shakes head disappointingly :)

                                                                                  Come on – the common meaning of replaceable/removable cables in the headphone space is no-soldering replacements. If we are going to broaden the definition to that it is almost absurdity. If you go into any sort of headphone picker/assistance and click “replaceable/removable cable” as a requirement, the DT-770’s will be filtered out.

                                                                                  EDIT: https://www.pcmag.com/review/355880/beyerdynamic-dt-770-pro (see cons)

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    Oops, sorry. I’m not a native speaker, sometimes I misuse words :)

                                                                        2. 2

                                                                          Massdrop has the HD6xx (which are based on the HD650) going for $200, and the HD58x (based on the HD580) for $150. I haven’t heard the HD58xs, but the HD6xx is an incredible headphone with a very competent sound signature and sturdy build quality. As a bonus, the cables and earpads on both are replaceable.

                                                                          There are decent headphones that go for even cheaper than that. My Sennheiser HD485s (~$65) are decent sounding and 10+ years old, and the only thing I’ve had to do is change the earpads after a few years.

                                                                        3. 2

                                                                          Where does your distrust stem from? There isn’t much magic there – they are certain driver or driver sets and you can even build your own IEMs with custom shells from scratch: https://www.instructables.com/id/Make-Custom-in-Ear-Monitors-DIY-CIEM/ (one of a dozen+ decent guides).

                                                                          The tech is around them both BA and DD has been making steady quality progress for the last decade, and timing, housing shaping and jamming multiple drivers in is a lot of were the work is. When people pay for something like Jaybirds they are paying for the BT and codex stuff as well.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Distrust comes from the fact that I have never experienced what I would call seriously high quality sound from anything like “earbuds”.

                                                                            Also my understanding is that the DACs in most mobile devices also put a limit on the quality you can get out of them no matter what you’re using.

                                                                            1. 5

                                                                              Also my understanding is that the DACs in most mobile devices also put a limit on the quality you can get out of them no matter what you’re using.

                                                                              Good news, that simply isn’t true, you can rest easy knowing that the DAC’s haven’t really been in issue in a couple decades. In the last 80s and early 90s, there was DAC jitter, low sample rates and various other issues. Problems with phone audio are hardly ever the DAC. Even the very-cheap tier of DACs tend to be so good as to never be the issue.

                                                                              Most phone issues around audio are either hiss or weakness. Hiss is just some extra power being diverted to the output by some rogue voltage somewhere making a jump due to temp or poor design. This isn’t a DAC failure but a design failure of the board, yet people often think it is a DAC failure because when they add an external DAC away from the voltage noise, it is fixed! The second issue people run into is just a weak output unable to drive the high impedance / huge drives they love – this requires an external AMP to solve, as it just lacks the energy to do it.

                                                                              EDIT: The majority of phones can drive the majority of headphones with no issue currently, so don’t let that worry you in terms of purchasing decisions. There are exceptions: large audiophile cans needing amps, very sensitive IEMs picking up too much noise, but they are the exception not the rule.

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                                                                                That’s good to know. I think part of it also comes down to personal preference on my part. When I’m listening to music or pocasts on my phone, it’s typically in environments where the chances of my being able to actually perceive high fidelity are very small.

                                                                                That said, I should probably look into a well rated set of budget bluetooth earbuds rather than just tossing $20 at whatever Amazon rates well :)

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                                                                          https://youtu.be/NQOWGUIm-mc is the best copy I’ve seen of The Demo.

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                                                                            I wonder if this was cleaned up recently from the commonly available version

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                                                                              I love the audio from it and want to see some of the samples in chiptunes!

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                                                                            You know the old saying … if your article asks a question in the headline the answer is “no.”

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                                                                              Or: “well, it’s a complex topic, let’s say ‘it depends’”

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                                                                              Can someone explain to me why OpenBSD still packages Emacs 21.4? I accidentally installed it once just before I lost my Internet connection and it was quite an experience – yet I don’t understand why anyone would insist on using it, let alone have it as an alternative to 26.1.

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                                                                                Probably for the same reason they still ship an old GCC: licensing. They reject all GPLv3 software.

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                                                                                  But they do ship Emacs 26.1. as well?

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                                                                                    Emacs on my OpenBSD system is 26.1, installed from ports.

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                                                                                    As @phaer implied, I also don’t think the license is the case. OpenBSD developers avoid GPLv3 on the base system, as far as I know Emacs is part of the collection for packages ports.

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                                                                                    I was also curious about it, as an Emacs user myself I don’t know what’s the benefit behind 21.4.

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                                                                                    Contrary to popular belief, Chaosnet is not extinct.

                                                                                    It’s actually growing in usage as emulation has lowered the cost barrier to entry and for operating the systems that traditionally used it. These are mostly Lisp Machines and PDP-10 systems running ITS and TOPS, but there are other implementations as well, such as Cisco IOS, VMS, MINITS-11, BSD UNIX, and Linux.

                                                                                    There are implementations of Chaosnet over Unix domain sockets, Chaosnet over UDP, Chaosnet over IP, as well as over Ethernet. Cisco IOS supports routing Chaosnet through at least IOS 12.2.

                                                                                    The small size and simpler implementation compared to other network stacks makes it well suited for resource constrained systems.

                                                                                    I am working on Chaosnet for BAN.AI Multics.

                                                                                    The main Chaosnet home on the Internet today would be the Chaosnet wiki.

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                                                                                      Worth noting that DECnet also has public IP-encapsulated hobbyist networks online:

                                                                                      The software you probably want to use for getting started with all this minicomputer retrocomputing stuff is SIMH. It has a relatively easy to use tap ethernet driver that should let you get your machine online. I used OpenBSD VAX on simh a few years back and it was painless; more esoteric networking protocols will be more difficult. Use the new version of SIMH from github, the older versions are not worth your time.

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                                                                                        I kinda want to see a SNA hobbyist network; VAXen get all the love!

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                                                                                          BAN.AI Public Access Multics is actually on HECnet as node BANAI (1.770).

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                                                                                          https://ban.ai/multics/doc/AIM-628_chaosnet.pdf is my copy of the “definitive Chaosnet reference”.