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    When I first started working remote I also got really lonely. It’s a real thing that I think is overlooked too often. People fail to take into account how effectively being alone impacts your mental health. I found that chatting online and video calls just aren’t the same as actually being in the same room/space as people.

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      I had the exact same experience and switching from home to co-working space changed everything. I felt that I had “colleagues” even if not working at all for the same company. I rediscovered that the “coffee time” wasn’t about coffee but about socializing.

      I cannot stress enough that having a clear distinction from working space and personal space is really important.

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        I have the opposite experience. I work remotely from my kitchen, and I can spend days without talking to or seeing anyone. No “cabin fever,” whatever that means. I kinda miss coffee table socializing, but only a little bit. In fact such socializing can be quite painful & awkward for me, and I’m glad I no longer feel the obligation to join up at a coffee table..

        I checked out some coworking spaces and my employer said they’d cover the bills but at this point I don’t really see many benefits to it (they don’t even offer free coffee.. I’d reconsider if there was a good coffee maker that goes straight from beans to brew). There are definite downsides, such as the commute. And having to lug hardware back and forth if you don’t plan to always work from the coworking space.

        Now, being lonely can be a problem but my experience is that obligatory lunch/coffee table time with coworkers doesn’t fix it. Time with family or good friends would fix it.

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          Very interesting to read someone having the opposite feeling and experience!

          I found that having to commute also helped to put rythm in my day and have justification for being in town and see friends before going back home. Isn’t it something that you miss?

          What your routine like? Do you wake up, have breakfast and stay in the kitchen the whole day for work? Or do you have a more fragmented day?

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            What your routine like? Do you wake up, have breakfast and stay in the kitchen the whole day for work? Or do you have a more fragmented day?

            There are plenty of interviews posted on https://remotehabits.com/ with questions similar to these. I’m not affiliated with them. I just find the site useful enough to post a link.

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              Thanks that’s a great resource to get new ideas and improve remote days!

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              I have it somewhat similar to DuClare. I visit the place about once per week, taking with me an Intel Skull Canyon NUC, and that’s about the right frequency for me. Traffic jams, parking and people get on my nerves, even if I get over the awkwardness of meeting a subset of coworkers. No real life friends to speak of, too.

              I do not have any routine, other than a mild morning coffee. When I feel like it, I do 200 hours a month, when I don’t, I do way less and focus on personal projects. Life is short, don’t do what you hate.

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                I found that having to commute also helped to put rythm in my day and have justification for being in town and see friends before going back home. Isn’t it something that you miss?

                No friends. Spending time in town was never really a thing for me. My onsite jobs have always been on the outskirts of town or in the middle of nowhere (e.g. in a monastery). When I had to commute to town (for school), I’d always head straight home anyway.

                What your routine like? Do you wake up, have breakfast and stay in the kitchen the whole day for work? Or do you have a more fragmented day?

                I get up at around 8:55 am, get dressed, brush teeth, sign in on work laptop at 9:05 or so and start working, with a cup of coffee. I might go out and buy something on the lunch break, or I might quickly grab something from the fridge and maybe take a little nap afterwards. Lunch breaks end up taking 45 to 60 minutes. I log out sometime around 17:30, give or take 15 minutes. It’s been a very regular routine so far.

                It works pretty well, though I’d like to get in the habit of starting a little earlier (8:00-8:30), keep the lunch break under 45 mins and get more of that evening for myself.

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                For the cost of a months membership you can get a pretty amazing coffee setup at home.

                I order green beans online (dirt cheap and they keep for years), then roast (40 minutes every few weeks), and grind (this is the most expensive part; spend $300 or more on the grinder).

                After that an aeropress or stovetop espresso maker is fine (comparable automatic machines cost many hundreds).

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                  Man, the difference between what they call coffee at work and my basic coffee machine with decent beans… I can’t drink that disgusting shit at work without sugar. And they’ve already changed both the machine and the coffee beans supplier. I just don’t understand.

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              Agreed. I’ve been working full-time remote for almost four years now. The first year was great. But since then, I’ve noticed a distinct loneliness about it, and I miss interacting with my co-workers more directly. It certainly isn’t for everyone. That said, it has allowed me a great deal of freedom to live exactly where I wanted to live, and I wouldn’t trade that for the world.

              In the meantime, I’ve recently started co-working at a local co-working facility, and I enjoy getting out of the house a few days a week. It makes a big difference.

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                This is my experience too. I’ve been remote for a little more than 2.5 years now, and I’m feeling emotionally drained because working from home alone all day just sucks. The freedom is great, but I don’t know that it’s worth it.

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                  How much does your space charge per month and does your company cover any of that cost?

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                    This so much. I’m going thru a 4 year “can i do this forever” period. sigh.