1. 2

    Waybar is written in C++, not Rust.

    1. 1

      You’re right. For some bizarre reason I was sure it was written in Rust — probably cognitive bleed-through from some other project (waysay, perhaps.) I sit corrected!

    1. 31

      I feel like the whole “Unix minimalist reactionary” scene is getting less detached from things that matter. Does anyone actually have any real qualms with D-Bus beyond aesthetics? It feels throwing stones from glass houses in the wake of horrible but fundamental like the POSIX shell that they enshrine as right. Suffering without working infrastructure like audio just seems like a self-own to prove a point.

      Side note: Using VMS makes me realize how crazy this all is: here is an OS with a far better help system that has interactive drill-down and - get this - examples! All while POSIX is stuck with 1970’s roff infodump hell (and they like it!) and GNU’s only improvement to this is a degenerate clone of ITS’ help system. It makes me really think so many of the people who think this is a good idea haven’t been exposed to anything else - and with how dominant Unix has been, why would they?

      1. 12

        I have some big issues with this kind of philosophy. The argument that software is getting too complex might hold some water, but a lot of that complexity is actually (imo) due to the complexity of the world we live in, and the fact that the software is solving complex problems.

        If this “minimalist” philosophy offered simpler ways to model the world, and simpler solutions to the aforementioned problems then I might buy the argument. However the actual tactic seems to be just refusing to solve any problem beyond a certain level of complexity. (See KISS’ refusal to support internationalisation).

        It’s all well and good for making certain desktop users feel happy about the aesthetics of their system, but I don’t see it really has much to offer the world as a set of ideas beyond that. (In fairness, I don’t think anyone has ever claimed that it does have anything further to offer, but if this is the case then I don’t see there’s much to actually say or discuss about it).

        1. 11

          Suffering without working infrastructure like audio just seems like a self-own to prove a point.

          I’m not “suffering” though? I thought I made that clear in the post.

          1. 5

            My love of {Open,}VMS is well known. For a while my vanity domain was hosted on a web server running on VMS with a DEC hobbyist license on an old VAXstation under my desk at home (back when I was willing to spend whatever it was to get a static IP from…whatever that DSL provider was in the US that catered to that. Speakeasy I think?)

            That machine died and my VMS host moved to being VMS on an emulated VAX running under SimH on Linux. The Linux box acted as nothing more than a bootloader to get VMS up and running.

            I’m waiting with bated breath to see what VMSI does with the x86-64 port of VMS. If they have a hobbyist program or just reasonably priced single-user commercial licensing…that’ll be fun.

            1. 1

              I’d love to play around with a reasonably priced/licensed VMS.

              1. 2

                Check to see if DEC…I mean Compaq…I mean HP…still has their hobbyist program going (it was through DECUS, the DEC User Society). If so, you can get a license to run VMS on Alpha or VAX hardware. SimH on modern hardware can easily run a classic VAX running VMS and better-than-full speed. It’s fun.

                EDIT: Yep, looks to be going strong: http://www.openvmshobbyist.com/news.php

                1. 1

                  It was actually recently announced that HPE is ending the hobbyist program:

                  Dear HPE OpenVMS hobbyist,

                  This is to inform you that HPE is concluding the HPE OpenVMS Hobbyist license program in alignment with the HPE >OpenVMS support roadmap. If you wish to understand more details, please reach out to us at the earliest through the usual license renewal webpage.

                  Thank you.

                  HPE OpenVMS team

                  See here: https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=de#!topic/comp.os.vms/_yh0_u7Vtj8%5B1-25%5D

                  1. 1

                    Well crap.

                    I hope VSI either restores the hobbyist program or has a relatively cheap hobbyist license. I’d be willing to pay, say, $100 for a copy of OpenVMS that runs in VirtualBox or something.

                    1. 2

                      VSI seems like the kind of people who would continue it. To me it looks like they actually want VMS to succeed, rather than just milk its legacy users.

            2. 3

              Suffering without working infrastructure like audio just seems like a self-own to prove a point.

              In my experience, and when I had more time to play with these things, one might get the audio to work, or usb devices to be detected, but everything seems unstable. Considering how complicated and dependent everything from the operating system to the hardware has become, the attitude seems to ends up not reducing complexity, but ignoring it.

              Using VMS makes me realize how crazy this all is: here is an OS with a far better help system that has interactive drill-down and - get this - examples!

              Is there any place where one could still find these documents?

              1. 1

                Is there any place where one could still find these documents?

                The WASD web server has a bunch of scripts out of the box, including a help viewer, which is conveniently hosted online for you. There’s also other manuals too, usually in the book format (which WASD also has a reader for) or HTML (they didn’t ship a VAX/VMS version of Netscape for nothing!)

              2. 3

                As someone who had a stab at creating a minimal musl based distro some years ago I’ve now settled on a pragmatic approach that works for me: Debian Stable with a few packages rebuilt to strip away dependencies/features that I do not use. Some examples:

                • vim-nox without Ruby/TCL/Lua (but with Python for :Black).
                • ffmpeg/mpv with fewer dependencies.
                • —no-install-recommends as default.

                With the package splitting done in Debian this leads to a fairly minimal system. Far less bytes on disk compared to similar Arch setups. You still have to pay the Glibc tax on binary size, but I have given up on getting a musl system that supported all my use cases.

                1. 2

                  I’ve found Arch’s mpv package to be particularly bad with needless dependencies. A while back I was able to shave off 72 MB (!!!) of dependencies and 60% size reduction in mpv itself.

                  I also remember trying to take a stab at a leaner ffmpeg, but wasn’t able to get things working. I forget why though. How’d you slim down your ffmpeg?

              1. 2

                This link requires a subscription. Could someone share the non-subscription version?

                1. 2

                  LWN articles are only freely available one week after publication.

                  1. 1

                    My understanding is that there is a special link that can be used to link a free version of the page. LWN don’t exactly encourage it, but they don’t discourage it. Could be wrong, been a while since I was a member.

                    1. 2

                      Fixed.

                    1. 4

                      The sad state of slowly loading SPA web sites.

                      1. 1

                        When I’m home connecting into work (which I do about 5 hrs each week) I’ve got the following layers to get through:

                        Linux on Laptop -> Qemu -> Windows 7 VM -> VPN with custom USB Token -> RDP -> Windows 7 on Work desktop -> VirtualBox -> Ubuntu VM

                        1. 2

                          I bet that’s a joy to use.

                        1. 13

                          The original blog post with external links.

                          1. 8

                            https://gethttpsforfree.com/ appears to be a resource for getting a certificate from Let’s Encrypt without installing or running the automated tools.

                            1. 1

                              For renewal via cron you could also use this 200 loc python script with no dependencies.

                            1. 5

                              I prefer OpenSSH to work this way, too. It does automatically on OS X, and I have used this patch to OpenSSH before but it still hasn’t been integrated. I think I will update that patch to -current and see if I can get it integrated.

                              1. 4

                                update: I had some trouble integrating the 5-year-old code into the OpenBSD -current tree so I redid a bunch of it and submitted the patch to the OpenSSH guys for review.

                                1. 1

                                  Would be awesome if this got accepted and I could throw my stupid hack away!

                                  1. 2
                              1. 6

                                Beginnings of a Lenovo X1 OpenBSD desktop (I’m migrating from Linux).

                                Configs for cwm, ksh, xterm, tmux and vim can be found here.

                                Initially I’m trying to use what’s in base. So far I had to reach out for vim. I might need to install a tiling window manager as well.

                                1. 13

                                  After 15 years on Linux I could not take it anymore and have started to migrate to OpenBSD: http://git.uggedal.com/obsdenv/tree/

                                  1. 3

                                    I switched my VPS from Arch Linux to FreeBSD last week. I’m in love.

                                    1. 1

                                      Could you talk about what you love? I have actually considered doing what you have. I love Debian, but want to try BSD as well and see the differences.

                                      1. 3
                                        • Going from rolling release distribution to a more stable environment was a big plus
                                        • FreeBSD has a wealthy amount of release information (they’ll tell you what they’re planning and when to expect it)
                                        • The package manager (pkg) has been a very simple, yet powerful tool that I’ve gotten used to over the last few weeks
                                        • Packages seem to be easier to setup and are cleaner (I haven’t verified this). I hate that Arch Linux has to have two separate entities, “official packages” and “AUR packages”… This is a frustrating model, in my opinion.
                                        • FreeBSD takes their security very seriously – they have a page dedicated information on security here
                                        • They have excellent documentation
                                        • They have an excellent handbook
                                    2. 1

                                      I would be using NetBSD right now, save for the fact that ghc isn’t stable, the haskell ecosystem is terrible. Now that I think about it, I could probably just run linux VMs on a simple and secure NetBSD host.

                                    1. 10

                                      Working on my highly opinionated linux distro: Bare Linux. It’s my take on what a lightweight distro should look like. Uses musl libc, suckless' sbase and some parts ported from OpenBSD. It’s not usable yet, but it can be bootstrapped from modern linuxes and is self hosting in a user namespace.