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    Quite an interesting read, thanks! Are the animated graphics are done by hand or did you use a specific tool? They look great.

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      I’m not the author, but the author said this when asked the same question:

      I used Inkscape to create the diagrams as SVGs, then I embedded them in the page and animated them with Greensock and a little bit of javascript.

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      i find quite ironic the fact that this blog post about the fastest site in the world is posted on medium, which took ~10s to load.

      Interesting read nonetheless!

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        3.27s for me, but that’s still slow I reckon

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        Here’s another build log that I have enjoyed reading recently.

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          Right now I’m using something homemade, using client-side JS for markdown rendering. Project site is here. The rationale was that every SSG comes at a cost: You have to install the generator itself, and that can me cumbersome when quickly wanting to update things. Client-side things have a large problem for SEO, so I may change (again) my setup in the near future.

          One interesting project I stumbled upon though, is precis, that uses git hooks to generate the ToC/arborescence. It look nice too.

          I know this is a bit far of your desires, but I thought precis would interest some people interested by tiny site generators / content managers.

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            How does/will it compare with existing rust linear algebra libraries such as rulinalg and nalgebra?

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              compared to rulinalg, aljabar is purely array based, and therefore all values will be stored on the stack. Also, in aljabar the size of the vector/matrix is fixed and the compiler will prevent what would otherwise be runtime errors, such as multiplying two matrices of incorrect width/heights. aljabar is pretty similar to nalgebra, except nalgebra requires a specific special type to be specified to each number that the width and height could be. This is a much simpler interface that wasn’t possible until recently.

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                Nice. I tried both of them and wasn’t really satisfied by their respective interfaces. I hope that you’ll succeed at creating a more straightforward library :)

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              I really like the look and feel of your app. I’ve been trying to do a minimal client-side js note/blog app for my personal uses for some time, with the hopes of coming to a solution that looks and feels similar to yours. Guess I’ll have one less personal project to do. :)

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                Thanks, I’m glad you liked it :-)

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                I really like static site generation, but they make it hard to update content while you’re on the go. I don’t have any dedicated hosting, so I wanted to use Github Pages as a hosting solution. I built a quick and really dirty solution that fits me, named tibl. I update my posts directly on github, and they are rendered client-side by marked.

                AzerothJS and CMS.js are projects that follow this fashion (and seem to be way better).