1. 1

    I recommend that you write the scaffolding generator in golang or rust. Golang easily compiles and generates a binary for a lot of platforms and it has good libraries for creating CLI tools. I wrote one in golang: https://github.com/unbalancedparentheses/gut/blob/master/gut.go

    1. 1

      Thanks, I’ll check it out

    1. 1

      I have asked to join.

      1. 2

        Great work!

        1. 4

          So far, only two:

          1. “The Intelligent Investor” - Benjamin Graham (revised edition)
          2. “Social Engineering: The Art of Human Hacking” - Christopher Hadnagy
          1. 3

            I have The Intelligent Investor on my bookshelf right now. Its been giving me the evil eye for a year now. Thanks for the reminder! ;)

            1. 4

              The Intelligent Investor”

              Great book. If you like I recommend that you check “A Wealth of Common Sense: Why Simplicity Trumps Complexity in Any Investment Plan” and the great Financial markets coursera course.

              1. 5

                Thanks for the coursera suggestion! Is this the specific course you are referring to? https://www.coursera.org/learn/financial-markets-global

                1. 3

                  Exactly. Shiller, the teacher, is a nobel laureate. The course is really good. It can get a little bit dense specially in the first weeks, but do it completely, it gets better with each week.

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            The value of blockchains isn’t the currency systems implemented on them- it’s the general distributed ledger. There are useful problems that can be solved by storing information in public, validated with proof-of-work, with conflicts in history being resolved by consensus.

            Coins are the carnival barker trying to push traffic into the system. Do the grueling proof-of work, and we give you an entry in the ledger that says you own some coins. Get in quick though (at least with Bitcoin), because there aren’t very many. But that means the value can only go up! They’ll get rarer over time!

            1. 1

              Yes the inflation model of btc is fundamentally unsustainable. Also it’s a bit unfortunate that the proof-of-work chosen is not work that benefits humanity in any way.

              1. 1

                The proof-of-work model chosen by Bitcoin is the most straightforward, and arguably, the most resistant to Sybil nodes and “cheating”. It is, after all, consciously modelled after physical mining, which is also arguably wasted work - dig up X tons of ore to extract Y kilos of precious metal.

              2. 1

                Do you have any good reading that you can recommend about cryptocurrencies?

              1. 21

                Here’s a couple of quick tips:

                • Even though you got some saved money: Make the tickets cost-covering. Take your fixed cost (speaker travel, video recording, venue, lunch) and divide them in per-head and one-off costs. Charge so much that you cover the cost, plus maybe 5% for disaster cases.
                • Try to make a small profit. Why? It makes you sleep easy and allows you to use the saved money for the next one.
                • Think about accessibility (wheelchair-accessibility, etc.) now. It’s easy to do upfront and hard to do later. Also, people in need of support need to know early on. Document what you have, give an email address for those that have questions. Communicate that. Example: http://zurich.rustfest.eu/accessibility (just strike off the list what you don’t have / can’t provide, see this as a list of options).
                • Work with social media and understand that you have a global audience. For example, if you have an announcement, tweet it 3 times to different times. Most people don’t read Facebook/Twitter all day, which means they will probably miss 1 or 2 announcements.
                • Don’t invite too many speakers. Invited speakers are cozy and you probably know what you get. But, the CFP often contains nice things from fresh people.
                • Also speakers: gamble and be willing to have a dud. Some of the best talks on my conferences were from unknown newcomers. A certain Steve Klabnik gave their first keynote on one of our conferences because we gambled.
                • For these reasons, have an semi-anonymous review. We’ve had cases where regular and known speakers put very lackluster proposals in, but we’re sure that we would have been tempted to take them anyways. Semi-Anonymous is the form where the first round of proposal rating just rates the proposal, not the speaker. The lower 50% are cut off. The second round is just as usual, with speaker identities revealed.
                • It’s fine to pick someone you like. It’s your conference. Just be aware that a CFP is a way to ensure you look in corners outside your usual circles.
                • For that reason, advertise your CFP. A LOT. Try to spread it outside of your circles.
                • Alcohol is the most useless budget point on the ticket price. Kick it, just charge less. “Drinks included” is usually “drinks pre-paid and if you don’t drink, you’re cross-financing others”. Obviously, non-alcoholic things, especially water should always be around. People that drink have no problem with just buying at the bar. Go to a place where that is feasible.
                • There’s a substantial group of people that is not into loud partying. Make sure your party places have quiet corners.
                • Quiet rooms (a room where absolutely no talking is allowed) are easy to make and people love it. After 4 hours of chatting and talks, people enjoy being silent for a while. Also, they make an easy social contract, which for example allows speakers to just go in there after a talk.

                This is just what quickly came to my mind…

                1. 1

                  All I can say is THANKS

                1. 10

                  I’m one of the organizers of !!Con in New York City, an annual programming conference about to be in its fifth year. if you’re interested, I’d be happy to answer any questions you have either here in the comments, or DM me and we can set up a time to chat. :)

                  1. 1

                    Thanks! I will reach you as soon as I finish working. I am a big fan of the !!Con, I hope you can upload the 2017 videos :)!

                    1. 3

                      Thanks for the reminder, we’ve had a PR open for that for a long time that you just prompted me to merge :|

                      http://bangbangcon.com/recordings.html

                  1. 1

                    There’s racism/inequality in government surveillance too!

                    We must fight for our right to be surveilled just as much as minorities are!

                    Surely, governments will find it in their hearts to graciously grant us that right. Write to your congressperson today, and ask for more surveillance!

                    1. 3

                      I don’t think the objective of the article is to point out that we should be surveilled as much as minorities are…

                      1. 3

                        I wasn’t being serious?

                        The author seems confused. He’s speaking governmentese, discussing what the US government’s laws say about surveillance and related court precedents, seemingly oblivious to the fact that the government will surveil whatever the fuck it pleases, no matter what its own laws say.

                        The Fourth Amendment, among our strongest safeguards against police overreach

                        Despite all the police abuse we’ve all seen, he still thinks the fourth amendment is a “safeguard”, like it’s magic text that somehow prevents police thugs from engaging in thuggery?

                        And so on.. the article isn’t much more than a virtue-signalling fluff piece, and a testament to the author’s confusion about reality.

                      2. 1

                        I don’t think that your troll comments will convince anyone to shift to your anti-government stance, so maybe just don’t write them?

                        I’ve seen quite a few of your comments now, and they hammer the same point rather monotonously, suggesting that your position lacks depth and nuance. Perhaps you should spend some time considering how your no-government utopia (or whatever it is you want to see) would work in practice? You might be surprised by your conclusions, or at least you’ll have more convincing arguments.

                        1. 1

                          It’s funny how you accuse me of trolling, with a comment that’s indistinguishable from trolling :P

                          your position lacks depth and nuance

                          You’re skirting around being on to something there. For example, there isn’t any nuance to extortion being immoral, or text on a piece of parchment not having magical powers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngpsJKQR_ZE&t=8

                          Perhaps you should spend some time considering

                          Perhaps you should? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNIgztvyU2U

                          Even those two videos are more than enough to make any sane person agree with me, so I’ll just stop here.

                          1. 4

                            I think you’re making two assumptions:

                            • Lobste.rs is a good place to share your outrage
                            • People here have never heard about anarchism or abuse of government powers or anything related.

                            I disagree with both of these assumptions. I think most people here are extremely well informed, and I also think most people prefer this site to be an outrage-free zone.

                            Now, I would like to read an intelligent argument for how anarchy would work in practice with 7.5 billion people on the planet, and particularly how you would transition to it from the current world order. That would be a worthwhile thing you could write. The videos you linked don’t even begin to address any of it.

                            1. 0

                              how anarchy would work in practice with 7.5 billion people on the planet, and particularly how you would transition to it from the current world order

                              If chattel slavery were abolished, who would pick the cotton? There could be severe disruptions to supply chains, companies might go bankrupt and people might lose their jobs!

                              Also, how well is being enslaved by governments “working” for you?

                              I think most people here are extremely well informed, and I also think most people prefer this site to be an outrage-free zone.

                              Reality doesn’t just go away if you ignore it hard enough, you know? That’s basically what you’re suggesting with the “outrage-free zone”.

                              So are almost all psychopaths resigned to a fate of being enslaved for ever by governments? Or why is this site so free of outrage in general?

                      1. 1

                        I am working in different open source projects with other members of my small company:

                        • We are writting an erlang’s database client wrapper that reconnects to the database after a netsplit/database restart/etc.
                        • We are working on a simple drop in WebRTC server written in erlang. Audio/Video calls are really easy to implement client side using WebRTC. Howeve it is not that easy as it seems to implement server side. You need to implement a STUN/TURN server apart from the signaling server. We are trying to package everything so that you clone it, run it or even download a docker image and you can implement your own WebRTC server for your iOS/Android app or webpage.
                        • We started working on a small Erlang dependency that automatically joins erlang nodes to the same cluster if they are in the same subnet.
                        1. 2

                          This is mostly about their laptops and tablets. I was hoping for more about their more exotic stuff: Kinect, HoloLens, etc.

                          1. 1

                            So did I, but anyways I found it interesting.

                          1. 1

                            Can I ask what the business model of lambdaclass is or will be?

                            1. 1

                              From this blog post:

                              LambdaClass, a Buenos Aires-based software consultant founded a while ago by some colleagues and schoolmates. LambdaClass has a special interest in distributed systems, and while it’s not exclusively an Erlang shop, most of its projects are implemented in BEAM languages.

                              1. 2

                                That doesn’t seem like a business model. It sounds more like an erlang hobby club.

                                edit: apologies, I glazed over the word consultant there.

                                1. 1

                                  The difference between a business and a hobby club is profit. We do have fun but we exists because we have clients.

                                  Developers are expensive and in many cases they don’t have the experience or knowledge needed. In a few particular areas we have experience and knowledge.

                                  1. 2

                                    I was not implying it isn’t a business, just that I didn’t understand it. I missed the part it is a consultancy. Thank you for clarifying. I absolutely see the value in building software stack so you have a pool of tools to draw from. I just don’t really see the benefit in running something indefinitely for free.

                                    edit: eh, im just digging myself into a hole. Apologies for a stupid comment caused by poor reading.

                                    1. 1

                                      You do have a valid point: for the time being we are more like a hobby club, one that sells services. We choose what we do and how over earning more. If we grow bigger we will need to be more similar to other companies. So that you know we are only 5 devs at the moment. I have to write a few lines for our landing (3 years without a landing page is way too much) and your comments made me realize we need to simplify our message. Thanks!

                                      1. 1

                                        It actually seems like a great place. A lot of what you guys have written resonates well with me.

                            1. 3

                              I think the title is missing a “know” between customers and about.

                              1. 1

                                Thanks, I thought it was correct without the know.

                                1. 3

                                  Oh sorry, did not see it.

                                  1. 4

                                    Good thing its worth the repost!

                                1. 0

                                  A majority of catalan people wants to hold a referendum for independence, with a significant share of the population supporting independence.

                                  Richest region in Spain wants to stop paying taxes to the central government? Hold my mate, I’m first going to get Lombardy’s independence, then separate the individual provinces inside it after which I’ll convince people to go back to city-states. Smallest taxes ever!

                                  1. 13

                                    Basque people leaving in Euskadi pay taxes directly to their autonomous government and not to the central government. On the other hand, it is pretty shallow to think that Catalunya’s fight for independence is a fight for paying less taxes.

                                    1. 2

                                      Basque people leaving in Euskadi pay taxes directly to their autonomous government and not to the central government.

                                      From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autonomous_communities_of_Spain#Degree_of_financial_autonomy :

                                      the central government is still charge of levying and collecting most taxes, which it then redistributes to the autonomous communities with the aim of producing “fiscal equalization”. This applies to all communities, with the exception of the Basque Country and Navarre.

                                      So the biggest of the richest regions wants to also keep it all to itself, just like those two small ones. The poor? Let them eat cake!

                                      it is pretty shallow to think that Catalunya’s fight for independence is a fight for paying less taxes

                                      They already have everything else: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generalitat_de_Catalunya#Autonomous_system_of_government

                                      1. 5

                                        In the three provincial councils of Euskadi (Bizkaia, Gipuzkoa, Araba) and in Navarra (Nafarroa) you pay taxes to the local governement and the local government discusses with the central government how much money has to go the central government. This is a right that Spain gave to a part of the Basques with the constitution of 1978. For the nationalist basque right and conservative party this was a victory. For the left and nationalist basques this was only a carrot that Spain gave to them while using the stick against them at the same time. In Catalunya, and the rest of Spain, you pay your taxes to the central government and then the central government decides how much money returns to Catalunya.

                                        Anyways, the problem for Catalans and Basques with Spain is not only a money or tax problem. I would say that is the least of the problems. Paises Catalans, Euskal Herria (Basque Country) and many other kingdoms that existed in the Iberian Peninsula where invaded by what is now the Kingdom of Spanish (it is the official name of Spain). What is happening now is not different from what has been happening for centuries:

                                        You say that they have already everything else. I don’t think so but I think that is a decision that the Catalans and Basque have to do. What I can assure you is that if a “problem” has existed for centuries, then probably it is not only a tax problem.

                                        1. 1

                                          that is a decision that the Catalans and Basque have to do

                                          Yeah, let’s let the rich decide whether they want to pay taxes. What can possibly go wrong?

                                        2. 3

                                          The poor? Let them eat cake!

                                          Right, because justice from Paul’s perspective is that Peter gets robbed and his money handed to Paul.

                                          Justice from Peter’s perspective might involve not getting robbed.

                                          1. 1

                                            Justice from Peter’s perspective might involve not getting robbed.

                                            But only after he managed to get an unusually big share of those limited resources, right?

                                      2. 3

                                        I can’t tell what you’re trying to say, but you do understand that no one wants to pay taxes, right? Not even you. Nnnnnope, not even if you claim otherwise in a misguided attempt at virtue-signalling.

                                        We all pay taxes purely because we’re forced to.

                                        So would it be so wrong of Catalonians to want to have less of their income confiscated and sprinkled all over Spain? What prevents other regions from being just as wealthy as Catalonia?

                                        1. 1

                                          you do understand that no one wants to pay taxes, right?

                                          Yes, of course. Do you understand why taxes are necessary even if we don’t want to pay them?

                                          So would it be so wrong of Catalonians to want to have less of their income confiscated and sprinkled all over Spain?

                                          Of course it would. The rich wanting to get richer is why the poor go hungry while we throw away food surpluses and while we plan to reduced the cultivated areas in order to keep the grain prices high: http://www.producer.com/2017/05/world-needs-to-slash-crop-acres-to-cut-grain-surplus/

                                          It’s either voluntary solidarity and very modest wealth redistribution or 1789 all over again. Pick your poison.

                                          What prevents other regions from being just as wealthy as Catalonia?

                                          Fewer natural resources, past inequalities, less attention from the people in power, fewer investments by the central government, etc.

                                          1. 2

                                            Do you understand why taxes are necessary even if we don’t want to pay them?

                                            The Spanish government arranges bullfights using tax money. Well spent?

                                            Also some might wonder if there could be better cures for poverty than sponsoring it, but that’s a certain downvote or a few.

                                            1. [Comment from banned user removed]

                                        2. 2

                                          Some people prefer the idea of city-states, and a smaller state does not necessarily mean smaller taxes, they have less sources of money so it would ensue that they would take more from those sources.

                                          1. 2

                                            Some people prefer the idea of city-states, and a smaller state does not necessarily mean smaller taxes, they have less sources of money so it would ensue that they would take more from those sources.

                                            What you don’t know is that taxes from richer regions are used to finance poorer regions in a redistribution system controlled by the central government.

                                            The plan for autonomous/independent rich regions is to stop contributing to a central government that gives them back in investments less than they contributed in taxes. Once they no longer need to pay for those terrible poor people, they can cut their own taxes as they like.

                                            It’s economical inequality at the regional level - the rich get richer, the poor get poorer and we wax poetic about cryptographic solutions for illegal referendums…

                                            1. 2

                                              We practice redistribution in Canada, so I do know about it. I’m not convinced that independence movements are all about the rich wanting to stop redistribution of ressources, it could simply be about wanting to have more localised redistribution, why send money to another part of the country when you still have areas in your city that struggle with poverty?

                                              It could also be about renegotiating that redistribution. for instance, I’ve always felt that the quebec independence movement was always about having more agency on how the provinces ressources are used.

                                              1. 0

                                                it could simply be about wanting to have more localised redistribution

                                                AKA: let my left hand pay taxes to my right hand.

                                                why send money to another part of the country when you still have areas in your city that struggle with poverty?

                                                Why get rid of that poverty when it’s the only excuse for keeping more money locally? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perverse_incentive

                                                1. 4

                                                  As funny as many of the examples in that link were, I’m not sure it applies itself to this situation.

                                                  This argument is pointless if you refuse to aknowledge any other intention than short term financial gain on their part.

                                        1. 4

                                          Interesting technically, but this isn’t good for legitimacy even if the state is supressing it. Your turnout might end up being crypto nerds and secessionists who are hardcore enough to become crypto nerds.

                                          [edit:] Overall, I put this one in “trying to solve a social problem with a technical solution.”

                                          1. 9

                                            So the better solution for “legitimacy” is to give up and let the censors steamroll you?

                                            I’m sure the Catalan government would love to use a fully “legitimate” means of disseminating information to their constituents, but they’re having a bit of a hard time.

                                            1. 2

                                              If they wanted to (and I bet they will) the Spanish government could just raid polling stations. My guess is Spain won’t tolerate this at all and will continue to put up with the whack-a-mole, to avoid setting a precedent.

                                              The only real two options are get Spain to agree to a legitimate referendum, or to secede with actual firepower to back it up. I doubt either is likely.

                                              1. 6

                                                Spain did not tolerate basques speaking euskera or catalans learning catalan at their schools. Now they have to tolerate it…

                                              2. 1

                                                What about calling for anticipated elections to get a majority of the Catalan parliament to pass the referendum law instead of doing it with half of the parliament against it? The referendum law was approved with half of the parliament against it, which represents more votes than the other half.

                                                Even for other stupid things like electing the executives of the public television they required a quorum of 75%, but of course not for this.

                                                This is a dirty play by radical nationalist politicians with an agenda, because they had the chance to make it legitimate but instead chose to sidestep half of the population and elected representatives to push for their agenda.

                                              3. 5

                                                Your turnout might end up being crypto nerds and secessionists who are hardcore enough to become crypto nerds.

                                                It’s not like that at all. The resulting website is usable without any crypto knowledge. See for yourself: https://ipfs.io/ipns/QmZxWEBJBVkGDGaKdYPQUXX4KC5TCWbvuR4iYZrTML8XCR/en/where-to-vote/index.html

                                              1. 3

                                                I’m impressed that he was able to get anything out of Spark+HDFS on such little RAM. I spent a lot of the latter half of my undergrad trying to convince four machines with 16GB RAM to do anything useful with Spark… usually, even with huge amounts of data, processing it would take about the same amount of time as my regular desktop.

                                                I guess all I can do is chalk it up to operator error. Maybe I’ll take a look at it for doing computing stuff in the future.

                                                1. 3

                                                  If the data you are processing is not really big, using something like Spark is an overkill and it will be slower than processing it in only one machine.

                                                1. 1

                                                  Fascinating. I’d have guessed it would use as few syscalls as possible to reduce call overhead and maybe increase determinism by keeping most activity in the VM itself. Could be optimization potential here.

                                                  1. 4

                                                    Call overhead in Erlang is really big. Erlang needs to do the dispacthing as late as possible to be able so that the developer can change the running code. On the other hand, this is a really strange use case for Erlang. It is not strange to have Erlang servers running for months/years. So it makes a lot of sense to optimize that use case: you start by default a thread per core and you have to launch schedulers to schedule erlang processes. It doesn’t make any sense to optimize for the use case where you create a vm to print something and then you shut it down.

                                                  1. 7

                                                    Is this truly what the world has come to?

                                                    Productivoty gains by writing Dockerfiles, config and shell scripts, when any sane framework and/or standard library gives you the tools to mock things.

                                                    Like why would a local developer want redis?

                                                    Leave the hall.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      The idea is to have a dev environment that closely resembles your production environment.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        I think you should use a virtual machine for this, though. For instance, in the project I’m working on, I’m on Linux and the other two developers are on Macs so my understanding is that Docker won’t help.

                                                        1. 3

                                                          This is exactly where docker helps.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            My understanding is that software packaged by Docker still uses the host operating system’s libraries/etc. under the hood. Is this correct? If so, then it doesn’t seem like a solution as we’d be still running on different operating systems.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              Not at all. You can run a different district. Everything is duplicated and you only have the exact versions specified.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                I’m sorry, I mentioned libraries but this is not what I really had in mind. (I also assume that autocorrect changed “distro” to “district” in your reply). I’m concerned about platform-specific issues like path lengths, characters allowed in file names, kernel APIs, low-level system stuff (e.g. OOM killer).

                                                                If the problem statement is: developers (and production) use different environments then the solution would be to make them use the same environment. I use VMs to achieve that and my impression is that virtualized environments are closer to “identical” than containers.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  characters allowed in file names

                                                                  Funny you should mention that. I ran into exactly this sort of a problem last week, where Docker, (which uses the host’s FS) couldn’t differentiate between files that differ only by case on MacOS’s case-insensitive-by-default filesystem. As a result, the state of my system running on Docker was significantly different from that on an Ubuntu machine, even with everything else (libraries, etc.) being the exact same.

                                                                  That being said, I still find Docker very useful for quickly spinning up an instance of something on my Mac. But in the future, I’ll think more carefully about where the abstraction ends and the host starts mattering.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    #needsmorevagrant

                                                      2. 1

                                                        Simply put: if environments don’t match, mistakes get made.

                                                        I’ve seen it time and time again - to give some examples: local dev using a mocked out in memory cache, prod using memcached/redis; or local dev using SQLite and prod using Postgres. Mistakes get made due to overlooking the differences between implementations.

                                                        No mock is as perfect as the real thing and it’s much nicer finding issues in development than at deploy time.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          Fire the dev and hire someone who knows integration testing.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            local dev using SQLite and prod using Postgres

                                                            I was in a similar situation (but with MySQL instead of Postgres). We were getting failure in production that we couldn’t reproduce in development. It seemed as if the program was trying to insert data into a column of the wrong type. This is how I learnt that SQLite does dynamic typing which is code for “we don’t care about column types”.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Yep, it’s the same for testing. There are plenty of companies out there use in-memory SQLite databases with their test suite “for speed”, without realising they’re basically throwing type safety out of the window and making their tests effectively useless.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                “Boss, I wrote a program that does the wrong thing but does it really fast!”

                                                          2. 1

                                                            redis is not only a good replacement of memcached, it is a great pub/sub server, a leaderboard and has a geoip api. I need redis in development because I use redis to implement features that use the apis that redis provide.

                                                            On the other side, even if am not a huge fan of docker, docker is useful in many cases. For example I use Void Linux and OpenBSD as my desktop operating systems. In one of our client we store data in riak. riak is not available in Void Linux, neither in OpenBSD. Thanks to docker I can easily run riak in docker.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            One concern I’ve had with OpenBSD is that the community as a whole has a pattern of making bad (EDIT: graphic) design decisions in the presentation of information. This article is no exception.

                                                            Is there a particular reason why this seems to affect OpenBSD the most out of any given unix-like?

                                                            1. 6

                                                              Wat.

                                                              1. 7

                                                                I think he means the garish fonts (Comic Sans MS) and colours chosen by people who associate themselves with OpenBSD thoughtlines. I believe this is intentional, to prevent people from judging the content by appearance, but rather instead content. Also, you can then proceed to filter out people who only cared about the appearance.

                                                                1. 13

                                                                  For me the only person coming to mind within the OpenBSD community who has modern web design skills is @jcs.

                                                                  1. 5

                                                                    Hmm, I suppose I can see why they think it’s a good idea, if this is really the reasoning. Suffice to say I completely disagree, at least with the degree to which they make their content illegible.

                                                                    I mean, taking this page for example, it would be trivial to make this page less of an eyestrain: remove the body and link background colors, set the page width to ~800px, and the margins to auto. Voila: an actually readable website that doesn’t rely on pretty visuals to seem credible.

                                                                    I suppose I just don’t understand why filtering out people who care about appearance is so important that they shoot themselves in the foot…or the eye, as it were.

                                                                    1. 7

                                                                      Comic Sans is actually an accessible font choice - it’s one of the easiest for dyslexic people to read.

                                                                      But I agree this website definitely is more garish than normal. Compare with the slides on pledge, which are straightforward and legible.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Its funny to note, Simon Peyton Jones uses comic sans for all his presentations too. His reasoning:

                                                                        This is a very funny question, why I use Comic Sans. So. All my talks use Comic Sans, and I frequently see little remarks, “Simon Peyton Jones, great talk about Haskell, but why did he use Comic Sans?” But nobody’s ever been able to tell me what’s wrong with it. I think it’s a nice, legible font, I like it. So until someone explains to me — I understand that it’s meant to be naff, but I don’t care about naff stuff, it’s meant to be able to read it. So if you’ve got some rational reasons why I should not, then I’ll listen to them. But just being unfashionable, I don’t care.

                                                                        I can’t say I disagree with the viewpoint.

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                                                                          I’m not sure I’d agree it’s especially legible, if you include implied aspects of communication. I don’t care if it’s “bad” or “unfashionable”, but it does explicitly look like a kind of jokey, “fun” font, that implies you’re doing something lighthearted or jokey. Which is why it’s named Comic! That’s not necessarily always out of place in tech content— you could use it an xkcd-style cartoony introduction to a topic, or on the cover of a “For Dummies” style book. But the first few times I saw it in a completely unjokey “serious” presentation, it threw me off and made the entire talk difficult for me to follow, because throughout the talk I thought the jokes were going over my head and I was distracted trying to figure out what they were.

                                                                          I’ve now seen it enough times that it doesn’t really distract me anymore, but only because I pattern-match “ah ok it’s a not a ‘real’ use of Comic Sans intended to be actually comic, it’s just that hipstery style that’s using it as an anti-fashion statement”.

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                                                                            In this case, SPJ has been using Comic Sans so long I doubt you can call it hipstery. And none of your arguments amount to anything beyond distaste for the font.

                                                                            Its named Comic Sans as its intended to be reminiscent of comic book style fonts not to be a joke. n.b. http://www.comicbookfonts.com

                                                                            I’ve read some studies that say Comic Sans is better for retention and possibly better for dyslexic people. And given some people actually like the font, I’ve also never seen a good argument against it other than “I don’t like it personally” or “its bad design” or “comic sans is a joke” or “comic sans use isn’t serious”.

                                                                            This powerpoint isn’t particularly hard to read, and i’m not sure why you would be treating the content as a joke were you watching the presentation: www.cs.nott.ac.uk/~pszgmh/appsem-slides/peytonjones.ppt

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                                                                              That’s a nice presentation, thanks for linking!

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                                                                            If you be­lieve reader at­ten­tion is a valu­able re­source, then tools that help you con­serve that re­source are like­wise valu­able. Ty­pog­ra­phy is one of those tools. Good ty­pog­ra­phy can help your reader de­vote less at­ten­tion to the me­chan­ics of read­ing and more at­ten­tion to your mes­sage. Con­versely, bad ty­pog­ra­phy can dis­tract your reader and un­der­mine your message.”

                                                                            source: http://practicaltypography.com/why-does-typography-matter.html

                                                                            If you are interested in the subject, read the full book: http://practicaltypography.com/

                                                                            Also check Why You Hate Comic Sans

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                                                                          “I can spend the rest of my life trying to appease other people or, I can do the the things that make me happy” – Trump, probably

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                                                                            If others didn’t matter, why were they sharing or discussing it with them on non-project forums to begin with? Best to not half-ass an attempt to tell others about something great if it was worth an attempt to begin with.

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                                                                        You will need to be more specific with your criticisms. From what I’ve seen they are pretty careful about avoiding fads and favor simplicity.

                                                                        • The installer is barebones but is easy to automate and even manual openbsd installs are faster than linux ones.
                                                                        • The init/daemon system is slow, but simple and easy to understand.
                                                                        • They took a long time to add a binary patch system, but the one they added is extremely simple to use.
                                                                        • They are conservative in packages they include in the base, but the base system is very secure and it makes it easier to support for the 12 month window.
                                                                        • They use CVS because they didn’t see a point in breaking an existing workflow and git is GPL code.
                                                                        • … The list really goes on and on.

                                                                        I don’t really see that many bad choices, just optimizing for different metrics.

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                                                                          @calvin above hit on what I’m trying to say. I mean graphic design, not technical.

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                                                                            Ah, haha, I think i missed the “presentation of information” part. Probably because the first sentence put me in a defensive frame of mind. Thanks for clarifying.

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                                                                            They use CVS because they didn’t see a point in breaking an existing workflow and git is GPL code.

                                                                            Could you elaborate on this? I wasn’t aware that that was the setup.

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                                                                              I’m not sure what’s to elaborate. The project uses cvs this year because the project used cvs last year.

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                                                                            Well, GOOG and MSFT and FB and AAPL all have hundreds of people making beautiful pictures.

                                                                            And their software is buggy and they are evil.

                                                                            ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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                                                                              Your comment reminded me of this recent story: http://www.osnews.com/story/29811/Which_tech_giant_would_you_drop_

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                                                                                Whereas MorphOS has just a handful doing thd whole thing. Its UX on desktop and part of site are beautiful. Works well enough for small, OS project. Probably other companies’ spending priorities rather than staff numbers are causing problems. ;)

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                                                                                  elementaryos is an example of a group of volunteers that have a pretty decent aesthetic sense.

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                                                                                Great projects, really inspiring.