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    I’m going to buy a couple Manning books while their BOGO is still bo-going (heh..). Going to catch up on IEM Katowice (CS:GO & SC2!), and maybe Expanse S3. Going to think about leaving this job and moving back home. Going to erg 5k every day, and afterwards maybe today I am going to try a Popeye’s chicken sandwich.

    If my CPU cooler comes in, I’ll assemble the Ryzen build. patience..

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      Working out whether or not to quit my job and start hacking on small software businesses.

      pros:

      • i have enough savings to not have any income for at least six months
      • i can fall back to part time remote contracting
      • i can finally spend time with my partner who works nights
      • constantly stressed and anxious in my current job

      cons:

      • leaving behind 3/4ths of a potentially very lucrative options package
      • it might take me a very long time before i equalise income with where i am now
      • there is a lot of opportunity for growth where i am now
      • it’s objectively the best job i’ve had
      • i’m wondering whether this is just due to SAD and i might regret this in a few months when i’m feeling better

      I’ve been wanting to do this for so long, but it’s a big leap to make, especially without having established a viable business on the side before making the leap. I’m also seriously concerned about regretting this and being bitter down the line.

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        Maybe ask if working part-time in current job is an option, and try to hack something without quitting.

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          Before you quit your job, I recommend checking out Growing Gills, by Jessica Abel. It might give you a tool set to start the side business before you quit your day job.

          Also, is the anxiety internal or external? Is it related to deadlines/your boss etc? Or is it hard to pin down, or internal? If it’s internal, it might be worth looking into counseling, since going solo won’t fix that.

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            Can I have your old job? Sounds great :) I really think you should stay, for what it’s worth.

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              I suggest don’t quit. Work on modifying the current work conditions.

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                Ouch. FWIW I’ve told my boss at the company that there’s a good chance of mms leaving (back to freelancing) due to some potential family developments. And a day doesn’t go by without questioning of I should do it or not.

                But I’ve been here before: did I leave a really great job to something I’m not certain is good for me. And i know it’ll end up well no matter what. We’re lucky to be in well paid line of work and can risk things - even with less then 6 months worth of stash and with kids.

                What I’m trying to say is that you shouldn’t worry, whichever you choose it’ll most likely turn out just fine.

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                  6 months seems like a very short runway, I’ll have to make the go/no go decision for putting your project aside with enough time to find and start a job, then make it to the first payday. If you plan on at least 2 months for that process, and another 2 months buffer in case something goes wrong and you have to start over, then you have two months to make that business bring in enough income to sustain yourself.

                  I’d recommend a) reading around the FIRE community for a little while to get a sense for sustaining yourself on investments and safe withdraw rates. Then b) reading about how long it usually takes for a small software business to start generating enough income to cover your expenses. From there you need to get a larger than b with enough of a buffer in case something goes wrong, say like the stock markets dropping 5% in two days.

                  edit: also really dig into what’s wrong with your current job, and talk to your boss about fixing it. They’d probably rather smooth things out than have to replace you.

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                  I honestly don’t know. I suspect these would help: lots of tests, short stack traces, short class names, same-but-different kind of tasks.

                  I think writing code is not the only goal, maybe not even #1: sometimes a whole day of capturing profiles, reproducing bugs, & writing down test cases is super productive. To give them the feeling they need to push code to prod soon or GTFO is not entirely helpful (and I suspect a lot of juniors feel that, if they’re not told outright).

                  But I wonder: what cars are good for apprentice/novice mechanics to work on? How does Habitat for Humanity use non-construction workers to build houses? What kinds of systems make progress thanks mostly to non-experts?

                  EDIT: as pnathan reminds me, if you don’t have a standard dev environment, you are entering a world of pain

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                    I know that it’s is possible to use FreeBSD for development, but I don’t think anyone should, practically speaking.

                    A post like “Can you use Windows for a developer machine in 2020” would interest me more. Because it seems like everyone is either using Mac or Linux these days.

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                      I don’t think anyone should, practically speaking.

                      Why?

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                        The reason is sum up nicely in the article already. IMO, if the software selection is the same, if I still use Gnome, still use bash, still use Emacs there is little reason to choose the OS with inferior hardware and community supported.

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                          Why should the default assumption be that you use Linux unless you have some especially good reason to use BSD? If FreeBSD meets your needs and Linux meets your needs, why should that mean that you use Linux?

                          Personally, after using OpenBSD on one of my laptops for a couple of weeks I’m keen to use it wherever I can. It’s incredibly well documented, stable and simple. It’s just well designed through and through. OpenBSD vs Linux today feels like Linux vs Windows did 12-15 years ago: limited laptop hardware support (only really thinkpads can be relied upon to work) and poor power/thermal management in exchange for much better design, system layout and understandability.

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                            If FreeBSD meets your needs and Linux meets your needs, why should that mean that you use Linux?

                            Speaking just for myself, if both are equally goods for my needs, I’ll surely go with the more popular option.

                          2. 3

                            The software selection being the same is only part of the story. If you can get the same software packages you need for Linux in FreeBSD, you’ll likely see the underlying system is far more stable and performs better. That’s the big advantage.

                            1. 4

                              Debian/Ubuntu is stable enough for daily usage, I wouldn’t ask for more stability. As in your article

                              Once you get it configured, it can “stay out of your way” while you get real work done

                              I has the same experience with Debian/Ubuntu. Maybe I’ll need to seriously gave BSD a try some day (I never manage to get it fully working on any hardware I had), but I’m pretty happy with Linux today.

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                                If you can get the same software packages you need for Linux in FreeBSD, you’ll likely see the underlying system is far more stable and performs better. That’s the big advantage.

                                This is only anecdotal evidence, but the last time I had a kernel panic it was when I tried FreeBSD. Do you have any quantitative evidence that FreeBSD is more stable and performs better?

                          3. 3

                            True! Though with WSL the Windows world is catching up. It’s not the same as actual Linux, but a step in the right direction.

                            1. 1

                              Why is it not the same? WSL2 actually runs a Linux kernel under HyperV. You can even run an X server and have the same graphical programs. The only thing that does not really work are Wayland applications (AFAIK).

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                                I think certain issues still exist (AFAIK?), but hopefully will be resolved soon.

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                                  For me, filesystem issues are a complete deal breaker. I have no OS options at work and can only use Windows and while its a decent work machine, I still feel that my Linux workstation and laptop at home run rings around it.

                          1. 3

                            Gaming mouse with oversized mousepad? You betcha.

                            Hey now, nothing wrong with that. Big mousepads, big cursors, big fan.

                            What happened to the original case? If you put new parts in it, would it become another ship? And more importantly, would they be == in JavaScript?

                            1. 1

                              i have a “xfx warpad” and despite the name it’s really nice, especially the “edgeless support system” is nice on the forearm.

                            1. 2

                              If VMware doesn’t run on FreeBSD, have you tried bhyve or jails?

                              I’m building a new Ryzen workstation which I intend to run 3-4 Linux VMs on Linux, but I’m open to either-on-either, any way to get it done, really. I used to run FreeBSD 5.3? back in the day, and it’s been a nice ~12 years on OS X, but I wanna get back to The Good Life. I used to worry about Flash player & 802.11b like 2 cacodemons, but it’s probably moot now.

                              What is the issue with Sublime Text? That might be my dealbreaker.

                              1. 2

                                libvirt supports bhyve, so any GUI tool that works with libvirt should be usable with it. It would be nice to have something as easy to use as VirtualBox of course, and adding bhyve support to VirtualBox is a possibility now that it uses KVM on Linux and Hyper-V on Windows for its hypervisor—the abstraction is there. There “just” needs to be a sufficiently dedicated person to actually do it.

                                1. 2

                                  If VMware doesn’t run on FreeBSD, have you tried bhyve or jails?

                                  I haven’t, but my current workflow uses VMWare. I’m open to trying Bhyve because I think it can solve my problem, at a later time.

                                  What is the issue with Sublime Text? That might be my dealbreaker.

                                  I couldn’t get it working in both stable and current on a few machines. Best I could do was get the icon in the start menu, but I clicked it and nothing happened. I will spend some time messing with it to see if I can get it to work.

                                1. 1

                                  Anyone know the “Snoopy calendar” reference?

                                  0044 Do you have a Snoopy calendar?

                                  0045 … Is it out-of-date?

                                  1. 3

                                    Hey! Here’s everything I know about it – unfortunately, it’s not 100% revealing, otherwise I’d have made a pull request with this two years ago, but at least it’s something:

                                    Unfortunately what I don’t know is the source of joke in the Real Programmers text, otherwise I’d have made a pull request for this two years ago or so. I suspect that, at one point, it was a popular demo for IBM computers, or at least an usual “toy”. The Real Programmers text is sympathetic towards IBM systems and old-time IBM programmers, and the program’s age and presumably original language (FORTRAN IV) fit.

                                    FWIW, the calendar is actually pretty cute. A long time ago, when I was very young and had all the walls to myself, I actually had one of those in my room.

                                    A bazillion thanks to @varjag for the invite so that I can post this!

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                                      Thank you for this deep dive! Very tempted to update this for a little mini A4 calendar. :-)

                                    2. 2

                                      There’s a plausible reference in this 1982 essay, which is more than twice as old to us than the 1969 Snoopy calendar was to them. O_o

                                      [edit: forgot the link] http://web.mit.edu/humor/Computers/real.programmers

                                      1. 2

                                        This is all new to me.

                                        [1] https://bigironnewb.blogspot.com/2008/01/real-programmers-dont-eat-quiche.html

                                        [2] http://www.pbm.com/%7Elindahl/real.programmers.html

                                        The typical Real Programmer lives in front of a computer terminal. Surrounding this terminal are:

                                        … Taped to the wall is a line-printer Snoopy calendar for the year 1969.

                                        I think Snoopy was presumably one of the first ASCII artworks.

                                        EDIT: see also Fortran source [3] https://gunkies.org/wiki/Snoopy_Calendar

                                      1. 1

                                        This is rather whimsical. :) The only way the “immovable object” thing makes sense to me is like:

                                        $ touch immovable.o
                                        Error: insufficient privilege?
                                        $ sudo touch immovable.o  # ok
                                        $ mv immovable.o there.o
                                        Error: insufficient privilege?
                                        $ sudo mv immovable.o there.o  # ok
                                        
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                                          If you can’t find it, just start cleaning. If it’s a big purchase, sleep first. Musical instruments and exercise gear are always worth the money. Never run a credit card balance. Pants 2 days, shirts 1. Oil change every 3,000/6mos. Park far away. (Ok I copied some)

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                                            3,000 miles is way too frequent if you’re running synthetic oil. Vehicles usually come with a manual that includes a maintenance schedule, follow that.

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                                              At least for jeans, I wear them sometimes months straight without washing – unless I spill something on them.

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                                                The environment is happier this way.

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                                              it was cheaper, many could afford it. 90US$ compared with 150US$ (Game Gear) and 180US$ (Lynx)

                                              Are we sure that’s not the bigger reason why? I remember the “user experience” of GameBoy Color where you needed to plug in a light to shine on the front of the screen. The battery life argument is strong, yes, rechargeables being kinda rare back then, but I feel like price is the elephant in the room.

                                              I think a much better supporting example would be the UX of automatic transmissions versus stickshift, like in the Chevy Corvette Z06. Or VCRs vs Tivo. Or why the-year-of-linux-on-the-desktop gets stuck at Mac’o’clock (for me, anyway).

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                                                On top of that, I remember this from an old Sega Power book (roughly):

                                                Ah, the Game Gear. If you like paying for batteries, there’s no better investment you can make.

                                                It drank batteries, six at a time. The Game Boy would just keep going and going and going.

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                                                  I remember taking the Game Gear on a family road trip as a kid…one Game Gear, between four kids, with no extra batteries. That was a solid 30 minutes of fun.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Check out the WonderSwan. It was created by the same person as the gameboy after he left Nintendo. Uses a single AA battery and last forever. That man knew what he was doing.

                                                1. 1

                                                  What’s the saying: grow senior engineers from within your own company, or hire them from places that do?

                                                  I can’t really imagine my tools getting worse, to be honest.

                                                  1. 3

                                                    Anybody read the Inner Game of Tennis? #4 is straight out of, I don’t know, chapter 2. You gotta look at film/replays, &/ get a coach.

                                                    1. 4

                                                      Well >region is in the index, and the AT>.. thing is down below, under A.

                                                      You can also just try digging through the source. With a tool, that is, I’m not going to read the whole thing. Download binutils-whatever.tar.xz, tar xf it, cd in, then rg PATTERN. Grepping for >REGION probably isn’t the best query, but AT> shows a bunch, like ld/NEWS:575, which reads

                                                      • Added AT> to the linker script language to allow load-time allocation of sections into regions.

                                                      I don’t really know what that means. You’re obviously in the right place. Don’t worry about Figuring It All Out.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        It’s COBOL, pretty sure, the language being used by the Canadian government. Anybody got any experience with these systems? I’d be curious how it all actually works.

                                                        [0] a job posting to write COBOL

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                                                          Yeah, well, if your site doesn’t respect user defaults, I’m not going to respect your site. Load you once, shame on you.. load you twice, shame on me.

                                                          Ever notice how you can pi-hole www.reddit.com to 0.0.0.0, but Google Chrome will silently ignore that and somehow do its own DNS request.. and it loads? After I’ve gone through the trouble of setting the OS default DNS (to try to stay off reddit)? Not very respectful, Chrome. That seems like something malware would do, and frankly it’s getting harder and harder to tell the difference.

                                                          Firefox respects user defaults. Safari, too. What’s the story, they’re “protecting my privacy”? Please no.

                                                          1. 4

                                                            Doesn’t Chrome also index your hard drives?

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                                                              I don’t think it does. What lead you to think that?

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                                                                Ah, I’m wrong. It doesn’t index it, it scans it. Sorry about the Vice link, I hate that about as much as I hate medium: https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/wj7x9w/google-chrome-scans-files-on-your-windows-computer-chrome-cleanup-tool

                                                            2. 3

                                                              Could be DNS over HTTP, which pi-hole doesn’t provide?

                                                            1. 2

                                                              Is it me or is that a lot of phones?

                                                              Mine are: Nokia 6150, Siemens ME45, Nokia 6230, HTC Tattoo, HTC Desire Z, KingZone N1, Nexus 5X - that’s 18.5 years and 7 phones (but I only count the N1 halfway because it stopped working reliably after 1 year and I still use it as a dedicated mp3 player..)

                                                              1. 2

                                                                It did seem like a lot, but when I actually list them, I have a lot, too: LG 8370?, Motorola V275? (contract upgrade), LG Chocolate (upgrade), iPhone 4 (got damp), HTC One X? (traded in), my brother’s iPhone 4, Nokia C2 (carrier issue), LG E970? (another carrier issue), iPhone 6 (replaced screen, gave to mom), iPhone 7. I miss the Chocolate, but iPhones are generally great to me. On phone #10 since ~’06.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                I will try to skim the Programmer’s Primer for Fortran Automatic Coding System (for the IBM 704) [~70pp]. I just want to know what it is, after a life of ignorance. Seeing fortran.io make the rounds rekindled my interest.

                                                                I intend to play through Half-Life 2: Episode One (it’s free!! atm), and maybe get into Ep Two.

                                                                I am waiting patiently for The Expanse: S2 & S3 blu-rays to come in the mail. Season 1 was really! well done, it just took me forever to get started.

                                                                Last weekend, I was LeetCoding and erging. Erged a little past my limit, I think (1hr, 2 days in a row), so been taking it easy. Got stuck hard on an Easy problem, too, which was a kind of motivational injury.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  This article just makes me smile. It explains so much, like why FAANG&c might pay so much (they can maybe get their money’s worth) but your local parks & rec won’t. It does seem a little obvious. Only thing I can’t figure out is where the original 1/(c/k+1-c) comes from, I might need to work it out on paper or something.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    I think grep at this point is a name + concept/interface + N working implementations. It hardly matters if it’s statically- or dynamically-linked, if it’s a giant bash script, &c. The options you pass matter, performance still matters, sure. But grep can be rewritten 10 times and we’ll still use it, because the name and the concept are just so compelling (like find | xargs, sooo good). I usually underestimate the value in unambitious interfaces & stable VMs, (tbh!).