1. 4

    The mention of (now deprecated) btrfs had me scroll up to check the date: 2015. Time flies!

    1. 5

      (now deprecated) btrfs

      Link to deprecation notice? I was under the impression that it was still under active development.

      1. 10

        I assume @varjag is referring to this redhat doc, stating that:

        Btrfs has been deprecated. The Btrfs file system has been in Technology Preview state since the initial release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat will not be moving Btrfs to a fully supported feature and it will be removed in a future major release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The Btrfs file system did receive numerous updates from the upstream in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 and will remain available in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 series. However, this is the last planned update to this feature.

        1. 3

          Some people are still developing it, but Red Hat is no longer interested.

        2. 4

          SuSE still uses btrfs by default, AFAIR, so it’s not deprecated as such, but it also doesn’t have a lot to recommend it……

          There is bcachefs, still in development; but even if it is successful, I would assume it would be at least a decade before it would be a real competitor for even present-day ZFS (which presumably would not stand still).

        1. 6

          We design and produce rugged VoIP phones used on industrial and roadside installations. They run 24/7; some are out in the field for over a decade with uptimes measured in years. I know they were used a few times by people caught in tunnel fires and accidents. Nothing really on the scale of what paramedics of firefighters do, but it is satisfying anyway.

          1. 1

            This is cool. May I ask you what I’ve asked a couple of other people in this thread: what does the software stack look like for these devices? I’d love to know what technologies (programming languages, software stacks, etc.) are used in tech jobs that don’t suck.

            1. 5

              Sure, it’s nothing unusual. Heavily patched Linux, busybox, userspace code is in C99 for the most part. A bit of Verilog on the side for FPGA-based peripherials controller. Java for the operator’s mass provisioning application. Plenty of work went into device drivers, especially audio codec driver to get the best performance: we have highest possible Speech Transmission Index score. Status reporting and management via Modbus and SNMP, and a special subsystem dedicated to self-diagnostics and failure reporting.

              1. 1

                Thanks, that sounds fun.

          1. 9

            This is a bold statement, I do quite a bit of ssh -X work, even thousands of miles distant from the server. I do very much wish ssh -X could forward sound somehow, but I certainly couldn’t live without X’s network transparency.

            1. 6

              Curious, what do you use it for? Every time I tried it, the experience was pain-stakingly slow.

              1. 7

                I find it okay for running things that aren’t fully interactive applications. For example I mainly run the terminal version of R on a remote server, but it’s nice that X’s network transparency means I can still do plot() and have a plot pop up.

                1. 5

                  Have you tried SSH compression? I normally use ssh -YC.

                  1. 4

                    Compression can’t do anything about latency, and latency impacts X11 a lot since it’s an extremely chatty protocol.

                    1. 4

                      There are some attempts to stick a caching proxy in the path to reduce the chattiness, since X11 is often chatty in pretty naive ways that ought to be fixable with a sufficiently protocol-aware caching server. I’ve heard good things about NX, but last time I tried to use it, the installation was messy.

                      1. 1

                        There’s a difference between latency (what you talk about) and speed (what I replied to). X11 mainly transfers an obscene amount of bitmaps.

                        1. 1

                          Both latency and bandwidth impact perceived speed.

                  2. 6

                    Seconded. Decades after, it’s still the best “remote desktop” experience out there.

                    1. 3

                      I regularly use it when I am on a Mac and want to use some Linux-only software (primarily scientific software). Since the machines that I run it on are a few floors up or down, it works magnificently well. Of course, I could run a Linux desktop in a VM, but it is nicer having the applications directly on the Mac desktop.

                      Unfortunately, Apple does not seem to care at all about XQuartz anymore (can’t sell it to the animoji crowd) and XQuartz on HiDPI is just a PITA. Moreover, there is a bug in Sierra/High Sierra where the location menu (you can’t make this up) steals the focus of XQuartz all the time:

                      https://discussions.apple.com/thread/7964085

                      So regretfully, X11 is out for me soon.

                      1. 3

                        Second. I have a Fibre connection at home. I’ve found X11 forwarding works great for a lot of simply GTK applications (EasyTag), file managers, etc.

                        Running my IntelliJ IDE or Firefox over X11/openvpn was pretty painfully slow, and IntelliJ became buggy, but that might have just been OpenVPN. Locally within the same building, X11 forwarding worked fine.

                        I’ve given Wayland/Weston a shot on my home theater PC with the xwayland module for backward compatibility. It works .. all right. Almost all my games work (humble/steam) thankfully, but I have very few native wayland applications. Kodi is still glitchy, and I know Weston is meant to just be a reference implementation, but it’s still kinda garbage. There also don’t appear to be any wayland display managers on Void Linux, so if I want to display a login screen, it has to start X, then switch to Wayland.

                        I’ve seen the Wayland/X talk and I agree, X has a lot of garbage in it and we should move forward. At the same time, it’s still not ready for prime time. You can’t say, “Well you can implement RDP” or some other type of remote composition and then hand wave it away.

                        I’ll probably give Wayland/Sway a try when I get my new laptop to see if it works better on Gentoo.

                        1. 2

                          No hand waving necessary, Weston does implement RDP :)

                      1. 13

                        When did the definition of bit rot change? Bit rot is when your storage has bits flip and slowly corrupts, solved by filesystem a like ZFS which checksum the data and can heal/repair the damage automatically.

                        1. 8

                          No, that’s the original definition from pre-ESR Jargon File.

                          bit rot: n. Also {bit decay}. Hypothetical disease the existence of which has been deduced from the observation that unused programs or features will often stop working after sufficient time has passed, even if `nothing has changed’.

                          1. 2

                            I agree, bit rot is corrupt data on disk. I like to use the term software entropy for what this article is talking about.

                            1. 2

                              I agree, the phenomenon described in the linked article is more accurately denoted as “technical debt”.

                              1. 4

                                I don’t think tech debt is the right description. Even a very well constructed program needs maintenance to keep up with the changing APIs and systems its dependencies run on. This is just software maintenance.

                                1. 3

                                  I agree with you. Technical debt is better applied to decisions during the design and implementation phase coming back to haunt you (in my opinion).

                                  But “bit rot” is definitely incorrect in this context!

                            1. 6

                              It’s not just software. ‘Just’ is the most dangerous word in life.

                              1. 2

                                Just say no to it.

                              1. 5

                                Missing Ingrid Daubechies, who invented wavelet compression (used for JPEG).

                                1. 3

                                  Do you mean JPEG2000? JPEG doesn’t use wavelet compression.

                                  1. 1

                                    Yes, JPEG 2000. Isn’t that just the most recent revision of JPEG though?

                                    1. 3

                                      It’s a new standard.

                                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JPEG_2000

                                      As of 2018, there are very few digital cameras that encode photos in the JPEG 2000 format, and many applications for viewing and editing photos still do not support it.[citation needed]

                                      As a keen amateur photographer I can say that many photographers capture images in RAW format, which is postprocessed and output as a JPEG (or a print). Other output options are TIFF… and that’s basically it.

                                      Mobile phones output JPEG, or in Apple’s case HEIF in newer phone software. I’m not sure if the underlying technology in HEIF is related to JPEG 2000.

                                      JPEG 2000 offers a lot of potential upsides but faces the classic chicken-and-egg problem of disrupting deeply entrenched formats.

                                      1. 3

                                        HEIF is a container format. Its big selling point is that it specifies how to use H.264 and H.265 encodings for image sequences: this makes it very efficient for those bursts of photos that iPhones do now. H.265 does also beat JPEG for single images but less dramatically so.

                                        A HEIF file can also contain audio and text synced to particular images in a sequence, which makes it nice for animations.

                                        HEIF itself is codec agnostic. Anything that’s compatible with the ISO Base Media File Format can go in it. So you could put JPEG or JPEG2000 images in a HEIF file. People have done this to store thumbnails or preview images as JPEGs.

                                      2. 2

                                        It’s a different standard, not used much in the wild.

                                  1. 3

                                    At work:

                                    • assembling 50 tiny PCBs (750 solder joints total) by hand, cleaning flux residues and varnishing them
                                    • interviewing a promising candidate for developer position
                                    • evaluating a couple industrial SOM modules for a new product

                                    Home, mostly continuing on a reading binge that started round Xmas.

                                    1. 2

                                      Let’s see.

                                      At $work

                                      • finalized the design, certified and pushed into production the best corded telephone handset since Alexander Graham Bell. Very likely destined to be the last of its kind, too.
                                      • tons of software and sometimes hardware customization of the products for various industrial customers.
                                      • started on developing an entirely novel kind of product; it is really pushing my technical skills to extreme.

                                      Hobby

                                      1. 3

                                        It hasn’t been until very recently that people have been able to even fathom the idea that you could have a Lisp that isn’t based on sexprs. It seems like once people learn Lisp they accept sexprs as necessary to the point of not being able to imagine anything else. So, I’m really grateful for all the time Moon has spent dreaming/studying this idea.

                                        1. 2

                                          Not so sure about this. There’s been gadzillion attempts at lisp with infix syntax. It’s a common early idea of a newcomer to the language that never sticks as you progress.

                                          There’s even been a real lisp (Dylan) with mature implementations and corporate support which tried to do away with sexprs. Didn’t fare well.

                                          1. 2

                                            It’s a common early idea of a newcomer to the language that never sticks as you progress.

                                            Maybe I don’t want Lisp in so much as as much of Lisp’s values without the sexprs. I concede I may lose something in the process. I’d also argue Ruby was a successful take on this idea in the OO realm even if it lacks a lot of the power of Lisp.

                                            There’s even been a real lisp (Dylan) with mature implementations and corporate support which tried to do away with sexprs. Didn’t fare well.

                                            I’m not comfortable disregarding ideas just because they didn’t experience success with the mainstream. I find Dylan beautiful and forward-thinking. Based on what I’ve read of Dylan, I don’t believe a deficiency of the language caused it to be passed over; but rather the circumstances of the institutions and time period it was created in.

                                            1. 1

                                              Same could be said of LISP itself versus mainstream languages or JVM LISP versus native LISP. The other factors of language adoption probably dropped those other attempts like they did most of the LISP’s with regular syntax. Hardly any made it. Those that did would also have strong cultural pressure on keeping syntax style that was popular in that niche.

                                              Still a chance that a Python or Clojure-like project with most things going for it could succeed with non-traditional syntax mixed with a capable LISP implementation.

                                            2. 1

                                              The Ancient Lisper in me (yes, I have a treasured copy of McCarthy’s Lisp manual) gets the giggles when I note TFA is hosted on cddddr.org

                                            1. 7

                                              This is entertaining and a technically solid job, but at some point you have to stop calling things like this a DoS attack. 44cm distance with over 100dbA acoustic pressure on an exposed HDD is simply not any real life scenario - you can as well smash it with your boot.

                                              1. 2

                                                You can get ~130 dBA acoustic pressure at 1m with parametric ultrasonic speakers similar to Soundlazer. Your point stands, but we should be aware of the actual attack distance.

                                                1. http://www.convexoptimization.com/TOOLS/ReviewParametricAcoustics.pdf
                                                2. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7329300/
                                              1. 6

                                                On eBay, when a seller tries to sell unpopular crap, they often put in the headline how it’s not some other popular item. This makes it come up in search and grab extra attention.

                                                “Kodak Instamatic NOT NIKON” “Original BIC ballpoint pen not parker”

                                                This is basically the same kind of headline. An old rant at capitalism disguised as tech piece.

                                                1. 3

                                                  Ford taurus, not mustang Ferrari skyline Camaro commodore, falcon, gt, cobra

                                                1. 5

                                                  “We understood from the start that we were selling counterfeit products, but the first thing you have to understand is that in that time in Russia, intellectual property was not protected,” he explains.

                                                  He lies of course. Copyright laws were typically not enforced, but what they did was still illegal under Russian law. The USSR and then Russian Federation were signatories of Berne convention.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    He said they weren’t protected; if the laws weren’t enforced, it sounds like that’s true.

                                                    1. 4

                                                      From TFA:

                                                      The law didn’t protect IP like games, consoles in Russia. There, our business was absolutely legal.

                                                      Which is simply not true.

                                                    2. 1

                                                      The law didn’t protect IP like games

                                                      BTW, were they also selling games? I never seen a game catridge with Dendy logo, only Chinese noname carts.

                                                      Legal reverse engineering of console itself is likely possible, even in US and Europe, AFAIK it doesn’t even have firmware. PPU can be reverse-engineered, CPU is 6502 (original NES had modified 6502 without BCD but with integrated PSG). Maybe Ricoh’s 6520 clone used in original NES was reverse-engineered, not licensed. Clones of IBM PC were possible and even more popular than IBM PC. Maybe he was talking about patent rights, not copyright.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        They certainly sold cartridges too, otherwise the whole enterprise would a be a non-starter. None of the hardware or software was made in Russia of course, but that’s beside the point.

                                                    1. 6

                                                      Work, getting around to repackaging my chaotic assortment of DSP tools into a neater library of composable functions.

                                                      Leisure, gradually going through Advent of Code puzzles.

                                                      1. 5
                                                        • The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of Bicameral Mind by Julian Jaynes.
                                                        • The Quantum Thief by Hannu Rajaniemi.
                                                        • Digital Signal Processing: A Practical Guide for Engineers and Scientists by Steven Smith.
                                                        1. 4

                                                          The Quantum Thief trilogy is /fantastic/. Weird, but fantastic.

                                                        1. 19

                                                          i bet i’ll be shunned for this:

                                                          shes really privileged:

                                                          • “blessed” with self confidence
                                                          • has enough money to travel. and i bet it wasn’t her money. sorry.
                                                          • she has the funds to decide that she does a “boot camp” in the USA, despite university is tuition free for her in sweden (or selected EU countries which don’t have fees).

                                                          edit: to clarify: she does deserve her success, but from my point of view she had it easier than many. most of the advice is common sense. i’m still not sure where to get the 4 hours for personal projects from if - as advised - i sleep enough. and being healthy at 19 is much more easy than being healthy if you are older.

                                                          1. 5

                                                            she does deserve her success, but from my point of view she had it easier than many. most of the advice is common sense. i’m still not sure where to get the 4 hours for personal projects from if

                                                            These all ring true even though I thought she was awesome. She’s attractive, confident, well-funded, and figured out how to work crowds by 16 IIRC article. Her results such as timing or number of recruiters calling her might in no way apply to the average person following her programming or career advice. However, she still had interesting things to say that they might learn from. Of the privileged people, she was also at least being helpful to others in one of her boastful moments. Plus, I give everyone digging into coding a little props for that, too, as a “Welcome to programming! You’re one of us!” sort of thing. :)

                                                            1. 5

                                                              This comment feels a little…something.

                                                              “blessed” with self confidence

                                                              Do we know this? Or has she simply figured out effective ways to put herself out there? There are plenty of highly productive people that battle mental disorders, in fact, their productivity may be a way to keep them at bay.

                                                              My point is to say we shouldn’t presume things by looking at a few attributes of a person’s life.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                Do we know this? Or has she simply figured out effective ways to put herself out there?

                                                                i guess “putting herself out there” took at least some confidence, more than many people have. maybe i could have picked my words more carefully.

                                                                There are plenty of highly productive people that battle mental disorders, in fact, their productivity may be a way to keep them at bay.

                                                                yes.

                                                                My point is to say we shouldn’t presume things by looking at a few attributes of a person’s life.

                                                                i wrote it because based on the article i got this feeling. for example:

                                                                I’ve always been very independent: I moved to another country by myself when I was 18, travelled a lot on my own during my teens, and have always been busy doing anything to improve my future. I’ve never felt pressured into doing stuff because society wanted me to, I’ve always done my own thing.

                                                                at last: why is it bad to say someone is self confident? i didn’t write egocentric ;) it’s a character trait that is usually viewed as a positive thing in our societies. one has it usually more easy if one is self confident.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  It isn’t bad to say someone is self-confident :)

                                                                  My point was to not view these traits as immutable, or bestowed. I have little doubt this is a result of her working on said traits, rather than them being bestowed.

                                                              2. 3

                                                                Any advice you see posted online (or anywhere else for that matter) is only going to apply to some of those who read it, and it’s going to completely miss the point for many others. It’s nearly impossible to provide advice that’s useful to everyone who reads it. While it can be worthwhile to point out things like this that may have also played a role in her success, it doesn’t negate the other things.

                                                                1. 4

                                                                  Most people on this forum had it better than 5/6ths of the world population. You’re really splitting hairs.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    i thought a discussion board is about splitting hairs? :)

                                                                    Most people on this forum had it better than 5/6ths of the world population.

                                                                    that’s just stating the obvious. the 1/6 part still has a large standard deviation.

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      Sure, in a 7 billion population even the top percentile has a large spread of wealth. It’s always more fun to look up :)

                                                                      What I was getting at is she is a first world girl without college education who started a technical career as a teen. Sure she didn’t have to walk to boot camp barefoot in the snow, but it’s uncommon enough in 2017 to be of notice.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  Excellent?

                                                                  Working the 37.5 hours as specified by Norwegian labour law, with occasional overtime.

                                                                  Earlier in the career had to work up to 60 hours/week at pretty exhausting stints. Wouldn’t recommend.

                                                                  1. 8

                                                                    The sort() function was using a bubble sort.

                                                                    Oh my.

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      I heard that in a George Takei voice.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        A library function, not a one-off hack in a throwaway program.

                                                                        Remember this people when you see the next agitated rant on unimportance of algorithms from someone asked to do an array sort at an interview.

                                                                      1. 8

                                                                        Horror-Story 2: Ex-Googler ALMOST rejected for not knowing the Bayesian formula by heart

                                                                        Lord I hate that sort of thing. “Oh, you have twenty years’ experience and a dozen conference presentations and published peer-reviewed papers and great references…but you don’t remember off the top of your head something that you could Google and remember in five minutes? DENIED!”

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          “Out of boundless sea of formulae and theorems in modern mathematics you can’t remember the one I really like? Are you for real?!”

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            I would have linked then

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              Thought the hanging cable harnesses are reminiscent of line shaft belts.

                                                                            2. 2

                                                                              That actually makes me miss cubicles.

                                                                            1. 8

                                                                              This side of millennium I started one C project in 2006, and another in 2014. Together they generated several million in revenues. And let me put it this way, ESR wouldn’t be writing NTPD in Go in 2001, so whatever reason he wasn’t coding has nothing to do with C.

                                                                              C was already relegated to a niche (albeit a broad one) before the Web took off. No one was really writing CGI scripts in C, but for backend core and systems programming it was and still is the mainstay. The inertia is tremendous, I don’t see Go or Rust (fine languages in their own) making a dent so far. Will be a while until curl, Linux kernel, Ciso IOS, Nginx et al stop using C and new C based projects stop spawning off.