1. 1

    I routinely install emacs on machines (they’re rebuilt daily) and just fire it up and use it with no extra configuration beyond defaults. If I am going to be using it for a while, I’ll turn on ido-mode (if I remember) and xterm-mouse-mode (so I can scroll with the mouse mostly ;), which I just do with a quick ctrl-x.

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      We have a lot of open positions at Shopify mostly in Canada (Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal).

      We use Ruby/Rails but also Go, Python… Great work environment and good perks!

      1. 2

        Nice to see remote is a possibility (I am in Mission BC & don’t want to move to KW ;). A former colleague left where I’m at for Shopify.

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          It’s not clear to me that SiFive intend to produce ASICs themselves at all for this design. But if you buy a big enough FPGA, you should be able to simulate it. Meanwhile, if you’re more interested in software than hardware, the $1K dev board they do sell could keep you busy for a while, and would be both faster and cheaper than the FPGA solution.

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            If they don’t intend to produce ASICs themselves, then what’s the motivation behind them designing this in the first place? Could they license it to someone who wants to produce it?

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              That’s the essence of their business model, if I understand correctly. The dev boards are essentially promotional items that they are prepared to lose money on. (Thus the lowball crowdfunding target numbers, which would be foolhardy if they didn’t already have funding.)

              You might also be interested in LowRISC if you haven’t already seen it. Can’t buy one of those yet either, but hopefully the hardware won’t turn into vaporware without some sort of interesting phase transition.

              1. 1

                Their business model is to make it easier to produce custom asic’s around their various SOC’s (ie custom accelerators, specific memory sizes, etc) by licensing them and helping with getting them made.

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            Hugo https://gohugo.io/ which works exactly like this… define some data types and layouts and views for them. It can even call out to external APIs (at build time) to get data.

            Coupled with a means of triggering builds (CI/CD, periodic, or even dynamic end points) and you have a pretty dynamic static site.

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              The only thing keeping me from looking further into Go is binary size. Yes I know, it might not matter that much nowadays, but I do care about that.

              The article was delightful to read and I’m glad more people discover Go and make use of it nonetheless.

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                Yes, it is a bit odd, but yet we think nothing about 10s or 100s of megabytes of installed dynamic language runtimes and RAM overhead in the 50-100MB range (minimum!). Granted those runtimes are shared, but for us we just compile our go code into a single binary (command/subcommands) so the binary overhead is at least mitigated and as @zge says, it is nice to be able to drop the binary onto a box and just run it.

                1. 2

                  Indeed it is very nice, and I give it to the Go developers that they mandated static linking despite the problems to allow this flexibility.

                  RAM overhead is a difficult matter though. The Linux kernel is a bit more slacky with memory when lots is available, but I with my system for instance have a RAM usage of ~70MB after boot, which is definitely a value one can live with. It can easily bloat up with many programs though, so your point is definitely valid.

                  We’ll see what the future brings in this regard.

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                    Wait, are you saying you work on a computer that, after OS, only has 70MB free? If so, why? I’m just curious.

                    1. 2

                      Haha, sorry if it sounded like that. The system has 32GB of memory, of which it only uses 70MB after booting. :)

                      1. 1

                        Oh OK. Too bad since I was hoping for some stories about crazy lengths you went to keep lean software, freedom-preserving/open CPU’s, or some shit you did on an FPGA. All possibilities that could lead to interesting write-ups for us. A 32GB RAM machine sounds cool, too, though. :)

                        1. 2

                          Haha I’m sorry to let you down! But it’s exciting enough to strip a Gentoo system down in many respects to make it as lean as it is. Maybe you have some crazy stories to share in this regard. :)

                          1. 1

                            All good haha. Due to memory loss, I actually can’t do that any more. I know I used tools that minimized kernels and just deleted stuff I didn’t think I needed. The coolest system like that is eCos whose configuration scheme I wanted for Linux’s and BSD’s. Other approach was straight-up deleting code out of Linux like Poly2 did. I never really took that as far as it could go.

                            If you’re interested in such things, best example I can give you is actually my friend “tommy” trimming a fully-loaded, WinXP box with Office, Firefox, security suite, and other stuff. He got it down to around 650MB! He backed it up onto a CD-R, too. Google isn’t giving me much. I did find two comments plus a guide he used. I mean, it was hard to say using WinXP was irresponsible or less safe than average Linux when some apps only had 4KB of code to attack on his box.

                            Although his “hobby” took “years,” it did inspire my recommendation to consider using Windows Embedded for corporate desktops with some script to similarly kill off all attack surface they don’t need. Maybe good for privacy-focused, Windows users as well. Wonder if the telemetry shit is visible in WinEv10’s configurator. ;)

                            1. 1

                              What an interesting story! Thanks for sharing and digging up those links, which probably took some time! :)

                              I’ll look into it.

                              Just wondering: Is the memory loss medical-related or just a figure of speech you used?

                              1. 1

                                Glad you liked it. Unfortunately, memory loss is not a figure of speech. I did a bio here when some people were wondering about contradictory nature of some of my comments, esp expertise I “should or shouldn’t” have. Spoiler: I’m a rare, weird dude. ;)

                                1. 1

                                  Damn, so my impression was correct! I’ve known your nick (pun intended!) for quite some time too, being an old fellow of Lobsters myself, and remember that you used to share really high-level stuff in the beginning but then very much tended to the comment sections and didn’t post as many stories. Every time you responded to me I felt honored because I knew you and respect your work very much!

                                  Thanks for the insight, I appreciate it. :)

                                  1. 1

                                    Thank you. It means a lot to me. Especially as things might get rougher soon. I stay doing what R&D I can for yall. :)

                    2. 1

                      they didn’t mandate static linking, dynamic Go programs are possible. it isn’t backwards compatible so that’s a thing to watch out for.

                  2. 4

                    Considering that people usually write Go on one machine, and let it run on another, having everything statically built is welcome. But I agree that it feels weird for native applications.

                    And usually, running go build -ldflags "-w -s" manages to cut the size by 1/2, though I haven’t necessarily noticed any great performance improvements.

                    1. 1

                      It’s discouraged to strip Go binaries as it can lead to unexpected problems, but your point is a good one. Still, I am used to very small statically linked binaries using musl libc. Going static doesn’t necessarily imply a gigantic growth in binary size and the Go developers acknowledge that it is a real problem (see this)

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                        That is not true.

                        1. 1

                          Thanks for the correction! :)

                      2. 1

                        UPX is really very effective at compressing Go programs, too.

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                      What’s the portability story across these differently customized processors, anybody know?

                      1. 1

                        Wouldn’t that be like SSE or AltiVec for instance, where some new instructions are available and detectable at runtime? I’m personally really curious about performance vs ARM or even x86 architectures.

                        1. 4

                          re: performance

                          https://www.sifive.com/products/risc-v-core-ip/u5/u54-mc/ (tl;dr ARM v8ish) Note most ASICs (there are only a few) to date so far are in the 32Bit MCU scale (ie m0/m4) .the U54 is the only silicon (so far) that is Linux capable.

                          These guys are doing some interesting things performance wise https://www.esperanto.ai/ but a few years away at least.

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                        Here’s the RSS feed: https://us18.campaign-archive.com/feed?u=ab0f46cf302c0ed836e0bf0ad&id=56b5f64c5f

                        I still find this the best way for consuming periodical content. I can read it when I want, and not have it clutter my mailbox.

                        1. 1

                          While this will work, just keep in mind that there are plans for exclusive content that will not be available via RSS due to its limiting nature.

                          1. 2

                            Out of curiosity, what is more limiting about RSS than email? The only thing I’ve come up with so far is that I guess you could customize what is sent to each email address, but that doesn’t seem to apply to a newsletter anyway.

                            1. 1

                              Customization is precisely my issue. The RSS feed will only render the issue as an anonymous reader, which removes any personalized messages I include as well as any exclusive content paying readers (will) have access to. Another issue on my end is that RSS subscriber numbers are not precise.

                              To be clear though, I am in no way against RSS. In fact, the whole newsletter is based on my ability to read tons and tons of feeds. Just that Morning Cup of Coding is not (and will not be) designed for RSS, and thus I will not be actively promoting its use.

                              1. 3

                                You could require that RSS readers append a “token” to the URL; which would identify the reader and thus give them said personalized content.

                                1. 2

                                  That could definitely work. Not sure how I can integrate that with MailChimp. I’ll give it a look this weekend. Thanks.

                                  1. 3

                                    You could always roll your own so you have more control:

                                    you’d still need something like SendGrid for delivery, but that’s not too hard either.

                                    1. 3

                                      Tbh, I don’t trust myself to build a software that sends emails to 3,5k readers :) But it’s definitely in the back of my mind because I still do a lot of things manually. I know about SendGrid and MailTrain, thanks for pointing out paperboy.

                        1. 2

                          For web stuff I use https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/bpasswd/dfehiejdcgoiofnfkdippnfadgdpnmlh?hl=en and find it works well (except for sites that in the infinite wisdom don’t allow me to paste in a password).

                          But… I’ve been thinking about switching to https://www.passwordstore.org/ (or the Go port of same).

                          For generating one off passwords I use https://github.com/ulif/diceware

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                            Is anyone else bothered by the use of the term ricing? As far as I know it is co-opting the automotive term which has racist origins.

                            1. 21

                              If somebody brings up ricing and linux, I have to think of this old site making fun of gentoo users w/o a clue:

                              https://web.archive.org/web/20080830031318/http://funroll-loops.info/

                              1. 16

                                This thread got pretty ugly. It started out good talking about the history of the term and what it means to people but has sunk into personal attacks. If someone would like to cite academic sources on the history of the term in tech or racing, go ahead, but otherwise we’ve stopped adding new information and this thread is done. Please don’t post further comments.

                                I’m also going to delete the comments with personal attacks. Please don’t do this. If you’re right, being mean doesn’t make you more right. Nobody has ever taken incoming vitriol and abuse are a sign that someone must really be worth listening to and seriously considering, and they’re not appropriate here.

                                Tagging so everyone in the thread sees this: @fimad @fs111 @voronoipotato @djsumdog @mjtorn @nebkor @brendes @btaitelb @dz @vhodges @leolambda

                                1. 5

                                  Sorry, I missed this because I was writing the post and went out to the food truck. honest mistake, wasn’t trying to be a butt. I got a little reactionary there, it won’t happen again.

                                  1. 3

                                    Nobody has ever taken incoming vitriol and abuse are a sign that someone must really be worth listening to and seriously considering, and they’re not appropriate here.

                                    Let’s etch that in bronze and hang that over every discussion area on the Internet, please.

                                    1. 2

                                      Exactly.

                                  2. 13

                                    Hmm, I didn’t know about that at all. Would be nice to have a better term. Customization seems too general.

                                    1. 10

                                      “Tweaking” seems to capture it pretty well.

                                      1. 9

                                        I considered that, but “tweaking” also means being high on stimulants, which is just common enough in the hacker community that I think it would be confusing.

                                        Perhaps modding, but that’s already a massively overloaded term: game modding, hardware modding, etc.

                                        I’m inclined to use “dotting”, as in “dotfile”, but also with the connotation of meticulousness (as in “dotting i’s and crossing t’s”. Its alternate definitions are pretty tame, as well.

                                        1. 1

                                          Dotting sounds what a dotard does, but I guess that’d be “doting”.

                                          1. 1

                                            Yeah, good point. I like “styling”.

                                      2. 7

                                        tuning, maybe?

                                        1. 1

                                          That looks more apropriate: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuning

                                          Fine tuning a computer environment” could be your job. “Like car tuning but for software” would be the hobby.

                                        2. 5

                                          from other communities: Hot Rodding (cars - more Chip Foose than useless spoilers on the back) and Modding (computer cases)

                                          1. 3

                                            Given that there’s a lot of style at work, maybe “peacocking”, spiffing up”, “turning out”, something riffing on fashion.

                                            1. 2

                                              It’s like styling, but like even more so. Stylizing?

                                              1. 4

                                                Styling is good, yeah. “Stylize” actually means “to depict or treat in a mannered and nonrealistic style”, so I don’t think it’s really applicable here.

                                            2. 3

                                              I had never seen it used in the Linux desktop. The term ricer may not have the same racist meanings as before but two things are common about ricers in my area:

                                              1. mostly second hand Japanese cars because they are cheap but American pickup trucks are also part of it
                                              2. many ricers seem to be of Hispanic ethnicity so it’s no longer a racist slang about Asians

                                              My personal view is that, even when a word has no racist origins, if there is a specific ethnicity that it applies to, it will quickly become a racist word anyway. Luckily there are more and more white dudes who bought their first car and became a ricer 🍚

                                              1. 5

                                                I had never seen it used in the Linux desktop.

                                                My perspective is exactly the opposite – I have never heard this term in connection to cars, just with *nix customization, especially in and around the Linux/Unix community. In over 4 years I’ve never heard anyone use it in any other context, nor was I in any sense aware that it had this other meaning. And I would suppose that most people, especially non-car enthusiasts like me would have probably never found out, nor use the term with this connotation.

                                                All in all, it seems like a fantastic starting point for a horrible confusion…

                                              2. 5

                                                Yes, and yes. :( . It’s unfortunate when a racist term becomes so normalized that it’s just vernacular. Then the people who want to use it xenophobically basically get to do so and nobody speaks up because it’s just a word everyone uses. The term in guns is “Tacticool”. Perhaps there’s a good word for this that is less regressive and a little more general.

                                                1. 5

                                                  It doesn’t have racist origins; or at least not in the context we used it in back when I was in various SCCA and use to race. A ricer is just someone who adds all kinds of shit to their car. Each sticker adds 2hp. The K&N air filter adds 10hp. Big cardboard wing adds 90hp. Fart can exhaust adds 30hp. That carbon fibre hood? 120hp right there.

                                                  Most ricers were white. They were just kids who didn’t know dick about cars and pretended they did. They’d fill the parking lot and hang out in their riced out Hondas while the rest of us raced. I mean if you stretch, some people might trace ricer back to the term wigger referring to white people enacting black culture.

                                                  Ricers had nothing to do with race and more to do with shitty car mods like these: https://www.reddit.com/r/Shitty_Car_Mods/

                                                  1. 12

                                                    Ricer aka rice burner kinda does though because it was about japanese cars. Yes this is where the term comes from and no I’m not shitting you.

                                                    Rice burner is a pejorative, used as early as the 1960s, originally describing Japanese motorcycles, then later applied to Japanese cars, and eventually to Asian-made motorcycles and automobiles in general. The term most often refers to vehicles manufactured in East Asia, where rice is a staple food.

                                                    I’ll be honest terms like wigger are also regressive. I’m not telling you how to speak or trying to say this is what you meant by it. Obviously you can use a word with racist or ethnocentric origins non-racistly. Just keep in mind that not everyone who uses it is using it the way you’re using it. Also keep in mind that someone who sees you using it might think you have it out for a specific ethnicity until they get to know you a bit better.

                                                    Frankly the title evokes a “Yikes” from me but in a “Yikes they don’t even know how bad that sounds” way. Like people who know you will probably go “Oh but that’s djsumdog, he doesn’t mean it in a racist way”, but wow it is just a really bad idea to lead with a racially loaded term in your article title to the general public.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      You quoted it yourself: it’s pejorative, not racist. The difference is significant, yet the whole point is moot, because so few people are neurotic about political correctness in slang etymology[citation needed]

                                                      1. 5

                                                        Things can be both pejorative and racist? Many racist things are pejorative. The term is racist because it uses East Asian products as a way to describe inferiority. To put in in a more personal way it would be like me saying “oh that’s snake code” as a pejorative for python programmers.It tries to illogically assert that since you’ve seen a python programmer make bad code, that a python programmer can never write good code. This is of course is horseshit, and is bigoted against python programmers. I’m merely trying to dislodge bullshit like that from the public consciousness.

                                                    2. 7

                                                      From my experience it is probably racist. Case in point: In Edmonton they call riced cars ‘Nip’d up’ (racial slang for Japanese) since it would be mostly Asian drivers doing the mods.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Depending on your comfort level with admin stuff (and laziness ;) you can always host it yourself (https://www.c0ffee.net/blog/mail-server-guide - seems to be a good guide). Multiple virtual domains and many mail boxes for about $5-$10 month on a VPS.

                                                    Edit: But I tend to use sendgrid for transactional emails.

                                                    1. 4

                                                      The nice thing about make (vs some to other arguably better tool that needs to be installed) is that it comes installed just about everywhere.

                                                      I’ve been using Makefiles for my Go projects. They are simple, just wrapping gb as well as some build dependencies (ie golang and gb). so I don’t need to worry too much about portability and since make comes installed my projects are eas(y:ier) to bootstrap.

                                                      I’ll have to checkout some of the options mentioned here, especially ninja and cmake… But typing make is very hardwired into my muscle memory ;)

                                                      1. 1

                                                        installed just about everywhere

                                                        Except for the OS used by almost 50% of developers.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Sure, but it doesn’t have visual studio installed by default either. I would prefer something like cmake however that can create either a make file or visual studio project (And more)

                                                      1. 7

                                                        I ran BeOS as my primary os in the late 90’s for about 15 months (on a low end mac clone!), but had to drop it as a daily driver because of the lack of Java tooling (which is what I was doing at the time).

                                                        That and I only had access to the built in C compiler that was limited to the size of executable it would produce left me little opportunity for software development. I do remember porting the plan9 rc shell using it as well as the galaxies X11 screenblanker.

                                                        I played with the x86 release for a bitI checkout Haiku every one in while (along with Aros and ReactOS) but was back to running Linux as my primary by then.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          That’s neat you got to use it. I heard the compile times were slow possibly due to microkernel-style but maybe speculation. Another person said the filesystem was too clever. Did you have problems with these? And just how awesome (or not) was the responsiveness under load? They claimed it was great with gradual degradation as it got overloaded with it maybe going back to normal afterward. I still don’t have that on this backup laptop for Linux haha. Browsers especially can cause slowdowns at a distance.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            I didn’t notice slow compiles, but it was only a 140Mhz 603 ;) The file system was cool but I never really took advantage of it.

                                                            The Internet was also much different from today (HTML 3.2 was still a thing) so the browser was not the resource pig it seems to have become (300-400 MB per TAB?!?!).

                                                            And lastly I never manage to tax any of my systems all that much.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              Appreciate the detailed reply. Esp frequency as I was curious what they ran. When secure hardware gets bootstrapped, it will be on the same nodes as original Pentium or maybe P2. So, I try to track what people could do with the older chips in case it becomes handy for a minimalist, secure workstation later. On top of it just being fun to learn about stuff.

                                                        1. 4

                                                          Is this just a mirror or are OpenBSD taking contributions via pull request?

                                                          1. 2

                                                            I believe it’s just a mirror and I doubt contributions are being taken via pull request (although @jcs can confirm).

                                                            BTW, the mirror has been there for quite a while if I’m not mistaken…

                                                            1. 4

                                                              It’s hitting news because of the official link on the openbsd.org website. See the commit.

                                                              1. 5

                                                                Or maybe this one ;)

                                                                1. 5

                                                                  I prefer this one ;)

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Yes! That’s the good one! :D

                                                          1. 3

                                                            I like lab notebooks because they fold open flat. Unfortunately the one I use is 11.75" x 9.5". Lab notebooks are designed for researchers who need to staple pages into it, so it’s certainly too large for you, but maybe it’s a useful keyword for your searches.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              Thank you, if I can find a smaller version of this it may be what I need, since I am left-handed and notebooks that don’t fold flat can be annoying.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                http://www.bookfactory.com/ has smaller sizes

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  Thanks! That’s exactly what I was looking for :)

                                                              1. 2

                                                                I am working on the documentation for my personal finance analytics and reporting toolkit (for banks and credit unions primarily) http://cashbooktoolkit.com/