Threads for vhodges

  1. 1

    $WORK is a 16” MacBook Pro (6 core, 32Gig) (2019ish). $PERSONAL is 2012 Retina MacBook Pro (quad core, 16Gig). They send me what they send me, but I won’t get a new one for a couple/few years now.

    My next laptop probably won’t be a Mac though (though we’ll see how far https://asahilinux.org/ gets in the next year or so). I am leaning towards a Framework (but also: Dell XPS13, System76 Lemur Pro are also options).

    I am in no hurry, the 2012 is humming along just fine, installed a new (and bigger) SSD and power brick, but other than that plenty of horse power for the things I use it for.

    1. 11

      Seems a bit like Microformats (the little bit I skimmed)? http://microformats.org/

      1. 5

        Microformats are cool. The idea is that you can hide structured data inside HTML without having any ramifications on the presentation, because you can throw arbitrary classes on things and then the microformat decoder will find the microformat structure using XPath or CSS selectors, without really caring about the presentation structure or the real HTML structure at all.

        However, this appears to be something more specifically tied to rich editing through the web.

        1. 3

          See also https://microformats.io which I find to be a nicer landing page

        1. 3

          I was thinking more about k8s for desktop usage (as a qubes-os like mechanics) when I saw the title, but then:

          >rancher desktop
          >desktop
          *looks at github sidebar*
          >typescript 35%, js 18%, vue 18%
          

          Don’t do that, don’t give me hope.

          1. 1

            Yeah, I think this is more interesting for developers that need to package for Kubernetes, like myself sometimes. And yes, for the reason you point out it’s probably not something you’ll want to have running all the time.

            It also remains to be seen if this actually adds that much convenience over just using K3s on your machine, and opening up Lens (also an Electron monstrosity) only when needed.

            In fact, I kind of wonder why people like to go for Electron for these kinds of tools, over running a web service inside the local Kubernetes solution that you can open in a better browser.

            1. 3

              Sensing some confusion on what this is (but by all means let me know if I am wrong!):

              This is for replacing Docker Desktop (eg run docker/k8s locally on your Mac/Windows box, usually for development purposes) and not really for running production workloads. It has a UI because Docker Desktop has a UI, but really what this does is implement a specialized Linux VM (using Qemu/Lima) for running containers locally.

              But at $DAYJOB this was not considered ‘production’ ready and so they are ponying up the License fees for Docker this year.

              Me? I’ve been meaning to experiment with Nix on Mac as a way of doing isolated envs, since even though we run k8s locally, there are substantial differences between dev and prod anyways and docker/k8s for dev seem to not work all that well in practice , requiring all sorts of effort and drama around working around the limitations they present (hence: devspace, Telepresence, skaffold, etc).

              1. 2

                But at $DAYJOB this was not considered ‘production’ ready and so they are ponying up the License fees for Docker this year.

                I got an email about that as well, and I just laughed wondering how they planned to enforce this…I guess they could just troll large companies for the biggest payouts, but it seemed like a real “nickel-and-dime” thing to do.

                1. 2

                  They can learn from oracle and their license audits

          1. 2

            I ordered https://www.newegg.ca/HPE-ProLiant-MicroServer-Gen10-Plus-P16006-001/p/09Z-01S1-000N5?Item=09Z-01S1-000N5 for my new NAS (if it ever gets here… being cut off (by land) from the rest of Canada is…. annoying - just checked and it looks like its arrived in the region!).

            Decentish specs, compact, quiet? and not too bad a price (on sale)

            Dell had some pretty good deals going for their tower servers too (but I don’t have room hence my choice).

            1. 3

              Company: Jobvite

              Company Site: https://www.jobvite.com/ and https://talent.jobvite.com/

              Positions: https://talent.jobvite.com/search/engineering/jobs

              Location: Remote US, Remote Canada, Kitchener ON, Indianapolis IN, Richmond BC, Bangalore, India

              Description: (from the website): ‘At Jobvite, our mission is to provide our customers with the tools to attract, engage, hire, and retain the talent that drives success.’ I am a team lead there and work on the Rails side of things.

              Tech stack: Java (In the ATS), Ruby/Rails/(Some, growing amounts of) React (and a tiny but critical bit of Go) (Enterprise recruitment marketing suite)

              Contact: Apply through the careersite or PM me with any questions and I’ll do my best to answer them (if I can/ I am allowed to).

              1. 10

                I’ve only used it for a sum total of 30 minutes, but https://k6.io/ was pretty easy to get going.

                1. 4

                  Never even heard of k6 before, it looks wicked. Nice one.

                  1. 3

                    I’m also a fan of k6, since it’s not more complex than most one-line CLI tools to get going, but you have full-on JS scripting if you need to script complex behavior.

                    1. 3

                      I’ve also had success using k6. Solid tool.

                    1. 6

                      Other than MacBooks, are there any UltraBook (or relatively slim) laptops using a 16:10 aspect ratio? I can work with 16:9 on a 13” display and love my PBP and ThinkPads, but I prefer a bit more vertical space (hell, I prefer my iPad Pro’s 4:3 at that size).

                      1. 5

                        The latest (gen 9) Thinkpad X1 carbon switches to 16:10.

                        1. 4

                          I use an old IBM ThinkPad with a 4:3 1024x768 display. It’s pretty great. (And I can look at it without squinting!) But it’s twenty years old, so I can’t watch videos on it or use modern web browsers.

                          That said, I’m happy that vendors are finally exploring aspect ratios other than 16:9, which is arguably the worst one, at least for laptops.

                          1. 1

                            And I can look at it without squinting

                            I thought that Thinkpads from the 4:3 era predated LED backlights; isn’t it extremely dim? I’ve honestly been tempted to pick up an older 1600x1200 but the idea of going back to a CCFL just seems like a step too far.

                            1. 2

                              In a sunny room, it’s pretty dim, but workable. I use light themes predominately. Not sure what kind of backlights it has exactly. Definitely worse than my X1 Carbon 3rd gen.

                              But I’d personally take a dim screen over a high-dpi screen. The X1 sees little to no use because GUI scaling never works well and everything is too small without it.

                              1600x1200 might not be too bad, though, depending on the size.

                              1. 2

                                You can run a HDPI display at a lower resolution, and it generally looks amazing since the pixels are so small you see none of them (whereas that’s all you see when running a 1024x768 ~13” native display)

                                1. 1

                                  Well, you can only run it at half resolution, right? Doesn’t work out too well unless you have really high dpi. 1920x1080/2 is 960x540, which is a very low resolution for 13".

                                  But I don’t know what you mean about pixels. I don’t “see” the pixels on any of my laptops, regardless of resolution. The only screen I’ve ever been able to visually see the pixels on was the pre-Retina iPhone.

                                  1. 1

                                    Well, you can only run it at half resolution, right? Doesn’t work out too well unless you have really high dpi. 1920x1080/2 is 960x540, which is a very low resolution for 13”.

                                    HDPI is not a resolution, it’s pixel density. I don’t think you’re limited to /2 scaling.. I’ve certainly done that (e.g. 4k display at 1080p), but also have run a 4k display at 1440p or a 1080p display at 1280x720.

                                    But I don’t know what you mean about pixels. I don’t “see” the pixels on any of my laptops, regardless of resolution.

                                    Strange, I see them on my partner’s 1366x768 IPS thinkpad x230 display. Maybe it’s one of those things that once you see, you can’t unsee it.

                                    1. 2

                                      HDPI is not a resolution, it’s pixel density.

                                      Yes, I know, that’s why I specified the size of the screen as well as the resolution.

                                      I’ve certainly done that (e.g. 4k display at 1080p), but also have run a 4k display at 1440p or a 1080p display at 1280x720.

                                      Hm. A 1920x1080 display should not be able to – properly – run at 1280x720 unless it is a CRT. Because each pixel has an exact physical representation, it won’t align correctly (and the screen will thus be blurry) unless the resolution is exactly half of the native resolution (or a quarter, sixteenth etc.).

                                      Strange, I see them on my partner’s 1366x768 IPS thinkpad x230 display. Maybe it’s one of those things that once you see, you can’t unsee it.

                                      Yeah, strange! As I said, I saw them on the iPhone <4, so I sort of know what you’re talking about, but I’ve never seen them elsewhere.

                                      Perhaps it really depends on some other factor and has little to do with dpi after all?

                                2. 2

                                  My home desktop has a lovely 1600x1200 20” monitor that we pulled off the curb for free. It’s actually such a pleasure to use; too bad so much modern software is designed specifically for widescreen.

                            2. 4

                              The frame.work laptop is 3:2 (And the pricing seems not too bad either - Looks close to double the peformance of my ‘12 Retina MBP and nicely confgured for ~1300US$ but my MBP is still running fine for what I’m using it for)

                              https://frame.work/products/laptop-diy-edition

                              1. 2

                                The XPS 13 has a 16:10 display now and even has an OLED option. Developer Edition (aka it with Ubuntu): https://www.dell.com/en-us/work/shop/dell-laptops-and-notebooks/new-xps-13-developer-edition/spd/xps-13-9310-laptop/ctox139w10p2c3000u

                                I’ve been eyeing it up for awhile now myself.

                                1. 3

                                  Note that, IIRC, OLED laptop displays are kind of weird on Linux because the traditional model of ‘just dim the backlight’ doesn’t work. I don’t know what the current state of the world is, but I definitely remember a friend complaining about it a year-ish ago. I personally wouldn’t go for it unless I could confirm that there was something working well with that exact model.

                                  1. 4

                                    Thanks for the heads up. I’m not seeing anything that definitively says it’s fixed now, but it does sound like there’s at least a workaround: https://github.com/udifuchs/icc-brightness

                                    Hopefully by the time I actually decide to get one there will be proper support.

                                    1. 1

                                      Huh, I thought the display panels would translate DPCD brightness control into correct dimming. Looks like I might be right: e.g. for the Thinkpad X1 Extreme’s AMOLED panel there is now a quirk forcing DPCD usage.

                                  2. 1

                                    Pretty much everything in the Microsoft Surface line is 3:2.

                                    1. 1

                                      All the 3:2 displays I’ve seen have been glossy; do any exist in matte?

                                    2. 1

                                      X1 nano

                                    1. 3

                                      I can’t keep up with all the AmigaOS drama, between all the forks with similar version numbers (i.e I don’t know which 3.x is most authoritative, ignoring the PowerPC “Amiga” clusterfuck) and feuding companies (Hyperion and Cloanto).

                                      (I tend to think the Amiga is extremely overrated due to the mythology that’s spawned around it, but I wouldn’t say no to a 1200 or something if one fell in my lap - since going price for them nowadays is criminal. That’s a side concern to “which Amiga company is the good one?”)

                                      1. 3

                                        On the orange site, I’ve seen this explanation for it:


                                        Kickstart 1.0 - 3.1: By Commodore. Actually 3.0 was “officially” last but 3.1 was ongoing work that got wrapped up well enough. I don’t really remember if Commodore officially released 3.1 or if it was picked up from their corpse by someone.

                                        HAAGE & PARTNER BRANCH:

                                        AmigaOS 3.5-3.9: First post-3.1 versions from 1999-2000 (for Motorola 68020 and up rather than 68000 and up) by Haage & Partner. Main features a TCP/IP stack and a new GUI, a new GUI toolkit called ReAction, MPEG movie player, MP3 player, >4 GB disk partitioning support.

                                        HYPERION POWER PC BRANCH:

                                        AmigaOS 4.0-4.1: First PowerPC-only version. Main features memory virtualization, new GUI, integrated third-party graphics driver support, etc.

                                        HYPERION “CLASSIC” BRANCH:

                                        Now they returned to 3.1 BUT with 3.9 source code still on their hands. Trying to advance Kickstart from a new angle that allows support for all Amigas, even the 68000 (Amiga 500). This is NOT for PowerPC. AmigaOS 4 is for those systems but since that’s basically a dead end in 2021, this is a more pragmatic move. I also find less “careless” and more conservative than 3.5+, focusing on kernel improvements rather than bolting on big third party tools and libraries. Basically more how I’d expect actual Commodore releases would look like.

                                        AmigaOS 3.1.4: Backporting numerous features and lessons learnt from 3.9 and now available for all Amigas, that is including the MC68000. An important update for classic Amigas since it brings in particular support that makes interacting with modern hardware easier with larger hard drives, and I think it added MC68060 support too for accelerators and whatnot.

                                        AmigaOS 3.2: A continuation of the 3.1.4 branch and now probably surpassing 3.9 in many areas.

                                        AmigaOS 3.x…?


                                        I always had a soft spot for Hyperion but I am not close to the issue to have a really informed opinion. Anyway, I posted this here because those with 68k Amigas will benefit from all the goodies in this update.

                                        1. 2

                                          At some point the (integer) library version numbers from the 3.2 branch are going to go above the versions used in the 3.9 or 4.0 branches and things are gonna get really confusing.

                                        2. 3

                                          (I tend to think the Amiga is extremely overrated due to the mythology that’s spawned around it, but I wouldn’t say no to a 1200 or something if one fell in my lap - since going price for them nowadays is criminal. That’s a side concern to “which Amiga company is the good one?”)

                                          Did you use it as the time? It was revolutionary and while I agree it doesn’t really fit into the modern world, I would argue it was a better experience using it than modern systems. The rest is just nostalgia for a simpler time :) (source: a huge fan since ‘83, owned 2x1000’s, 1x1200 and worked as a paid Amiga dev back in the day).

                                          The legal situation is why the Vampire team decided to focus on Aros for it’s line of accelerators/clones (muddying the waters even futhure).

                                          1. 2

                                            To clarify: I think at the time, the Amiga 500/1000/2000 was a nice system, but due to various factors like Commodore ineptitude, all the follow-ons were disappointing. Yes, it could have turned out better, but i’m talking about what we have now. What chafes me is the cult aspect; the dumb upgrades, the false mythology around the systems, and the grifter companies trying to sell router evaluation boards to eurotrash with more nostalgia than sense.

                                            I still think the Archimedes (due to a CPU fast enough it could just brute force its way to Amiga level graphics, ahead-of-its-time design, and influence on modern systems) and Macintosh (purely for software mouthfeel; Workbench and GEM are dire) are nicer systems, but the Amiga sucks all the oxygen from the room.

                                            1. 2

                                              I had to look up Archimedes to refresh my memory (Acorn had zero presence in NA), though I’ve looked into RiscOS a bit in the past. I agree on the whole Amiga marketplace - scrabbling for scraps. Not sure I agree on Mac/Finder being better, I do agree GEM was not (though I’ve never used it on either MS-DOS or an Atari ST).

                                              I gave up on my Amiga (a 1200) when I sold it and bought a (faster) 386 system and switched to Linux, it wasn’t as nice (far from it), but was more powerful. I even ran AmiWM for a while ;)

                                          1. 2

                                            Are there still 6502 / Z80 / 68K chips being made? I haven’t heard of any modern-day hardware based on them.

                                            I do know the venerable 8051 is still popular for very-low-end embedded use cases, but even back in the day it was described as extremely awkward to program, so I’d be surprised if hobbyists used it! (But what do I know, I found the 6502 nearly impossible back in my teens, so I never got into assembly on my Apple II. My friend’s Z80-based system was easier, I thought.)

                                            1. 3

                                              Yes. 6502 chips are still being made/sold by Western Design Center (https://www.westerndesigncenter.com/). Z80s are still around in the Zilog Z80, Z180 and eZ80 line. Freescale (descendant of Motorola) produces variants of the 68000/68020 as embedded products (or did until recently). There were also dozens second source and derivatives of these processors, and someone might still be selling those; I haven’t checked in a while.

                                              There are also specialty shops like Innovasic that recreate/reverse engineer old processors like this in FPGA/ASICs for long term support purposes. They aren’t cheap.

                                              I still use 8051s for hobby stuff. They’re weird but there’s, what, 50 years of tooling and experience to work with.

                                              1. 4

                                                Freescale (descendant of Motorola)

                                                Who are now part of NXP :)

                                                1. 2

                                                  My dad, who worked for Zilog in their heyday circa 1980, would be happy to hear that.

                                                  (He later worked for Xilinx, so he’d be happy about all the hobbyists using FPGAs too!)

                                                2. 1

                                                  z80 variant is still being made iirc as is the 6502 (and 65816). There are of course plenty of FPGA implementations.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    You can buy 17 MHz (?) 65C02 chips for $8, brand new. They’re still being made. There’s a very interesting new board being made using them running at 8 MHz: https://www.commanderx16.com/

                                                    8051 is not bad if most of your variables fit into 8 registers and everything fits into 256 bytes. Talking to more memory than that is pretty annoying

                                                    z80 and 6502 each have their own annoying quirks. With cunning you can hand-write some pretty tight stuff on either (in completely different ways) but both are awful for compiling C (or Pascal back then) to.

                                                  1. 2
                                                    • Build garden boxes
                                                    • Move my saas app’s hosting from Linode to Fly
                                                    • Demo data/account for said app
                                                    • Since the box is (probably) going away at Linode look at Dockerizing Stitcherd and getting it’s home page running on Fly.
                                                    1. 3

                                                      Had my eye on Fly for a while, but not used it yet. Would be interested in your thoughts once complete

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Yep, I am planning a write up on the why and how. I have already brought a copy of my production database over (it’s tiny still - hence this is time to move if it was going to move) and brought an instance of my app up on it which was pretty simple and straight forward to get running. I’ve seen it descibed as a less black-boxy heroku and I would agree with that.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          What is Fly? I tried googling “fly web host” but couldn’t find anything.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Ah, sorry I missed this! https://fly.io/ a less black boxy heroku PaaS (I am tending to think about it as a hosted Hashicorp stack though)

                                                            1. 1

                                                              No worries! Ah interesting, thanks!

                                                      1. 2

                                                        One thing that’s helped me is having my whole dev environment set up with a Vagrant script, so I can use it in a VM on various work, home and cloud computers and still have access to all the tools I’m used to.

                                                        Another useful thing is code-server, which is a browser interface for VSCode (which is already an Electron app so it’s not too hard to put in a browser). You can run it inside Vagrant (maybe on a cloud instance) and have access to a familiar IDE.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          That’s a fantastic idea! If I end up using VSCode at some point – I’ve bounced off it a few times, mostly because “emacs” :) – I may mimic that.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            A little late to the discussion, but I recently switched to VSCode and I am using https://github.com/whitphx/vscode-emacs-mcx for key bindings. It’s not quite perfect of course, but nothing that trips me up on a day to day basis.

                                                            I’ve been using Emacs since ’97 or so off and on (mostly on - I used Eclipse when I was doing Java work) and so the muscle memory is quite hardwired at this point ;) I do miss recording macros on the fly (though I might guess something like that exists for VSCode already).

                                                            I do drop into a terminal and run emacs -nw or mg (usually for writing git commit messages).

                                                        1. 1

                                                          I am using cqrs/event sourcing (lite I’d call it - using something mostly derrived from https://kickstarter.engineering/event-sourcing-made-simple-4a2625113224) for a (very) few things at $DAYJOB and yes the ‘audit log for free’ is a large part of why I like it but I also find it provides a nice pattern for defining a clean, low coupled API for updating the data models that is both resusable/composable and easier to test in isolation.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Company: Jobvite

                                                            Company site: https://www.jobvite.com/

                                                            Position(s): Lots: https://talent.jobvite.com/search/jobs

                                                            Location: Remote: (Canada, US, we have people in UK too), Onsite: Indianapolis IN, Kitchner ON, Bangalore India

                                                            Description: Application Tracking System and a Recruitement Marketing software from SMB to Enterprise. From the careersite: “We are Jobvite and we are on a mission to help people and companies grow as we continue to build and expand the innovative SaaS solutions within our leading end-to-end talent acquisition suite. Jobvite empowers talent aquisition leaders to better understand recruitment data and improve recruiting results as they engage, hire, and grow diverse talent”

                                                            Tech stack: There are essentially two. The ATS is primarily Java, the RM suite is Ruby/Rails (and some React) (and a tiny bit of Go :) )

                                                            Contact: https://talent.jobvite.com/

                                                              1. 3

                                                                I’m not sure this is an april fools joke. The discussion seems pretty reasonable and it was proposed yesterday, not on april fools day

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  You just got Punk’d by Ian Lance Taylor! Bummer.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Ian Lance Taylor proposing this seems pretty April Fools-ey, as he’s usually striking down new language change proposals. Also comments from Rob Pike. Though half of the people in the thread seem to be serious, maybe this is some kind of self-aware joke about how boring Go is?

                                                                  2. 2

                                                                    The submitter confirmed that this wasn’t intended as an April Fool’s day joke.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    I am working on a SaaS startup to provide tools for boards of directors that will help imrpove the quality of information they need to govern better while reducing the amount of work for staff and management to provide that information. The first implemented is a simple risk registry to replace the spreadsheet file we were using (I am on the board of a small CU here in the Fraser Valley). Others are planned. Working on the marketing site for it and then the TOS and privacy policies.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      I am using a TOMOKO MMC023 (Cheap 10 Keyless) and I have no complaints. I’ve been contemplating a 60%: Geek-Customized-SK64S from Bangood or a XD64 Kit are the contenders. I don’t touch type so ergonmic keyboards tend to be frustrating for me to use.

                                                                      1. 8

                                                                        I am one of several k8s admins at work and I really hate k8s. In the past I’ve been at another shop as a developer where we used DC/OS (marathon/mesos) which I found a lot easier from a developer perspective, but my own experiments with it made me want to stab that terrible Java scheduler that ate resources for no damn reason. (K8S is written in Go and is considerably leaner as far as resources, but a much bigger beast when it comes to config/deployment).

                                                                        I’ve dabbled with Nomad before and I do know some advertising startups that actively use it for all their apps/jobs. If I was getting into the startup space again, I’d probably look at using it.

                                                                        K8S is a hot mess of insane garbage. When it’s configured and running smoothly, a good scheduler helps a lot when doing deployments and rolling/zero-downtime updates. But they tend to consume a lot of nodes and it’s very difficult to go from 1 to 100 (Having your simple proof of concept running on just 1 system and then scale up to n adding redundancy and masters). Some people talk about minikube or k3s, but they’re not true 0 to scale systems.

                                                                        I did a whole post on what I think about docker and scheduling systems a few years back:

                                                                        https://battlepenguin.com/tech/my-love-hate-relationship-with-docker-and-container-orchestration-systems/

                                                                        1. 4

                                                                          You should look at juju. It uses LXC/LXD clustering to avoid a lot of the shortcomings of k8s (which are many and varied). Maybe Nomad is better, but it’s all expressed in a language named after the founding company. This in and of itself is enough reason to squint really hard and ask “why?”.

                                                                          Also: https://github.com/rollcat/judo It’s like ansible, but written in Go and only for the most basic of all basic kinds of provisioning.

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            re: HCL

                                                                            I look at it this way. HCL is a (from the README) a toolkit for building config lanuages… “Inspired by libucl, nginx configuration, and others.” yaml is a pain to hand edit when they get large (ie k8s). json is a pain too (no comments for example - as an aside, why are we (still) using serialization formats for config files!?). toml is … okay… but a bit strange to get the structure right. It brings consistency (mostly) between their own products and being open source, means others can adopt it as well.

                                                                            1. 3

                                                                              My understanding is you can use JSON anywhere HCL is accepted by the tools as well, so if you’re generating it out of some other system you can emit JSON not have to emit HCL.

                                                                              I much prefer writing HCL[2] for configuring things, it’s a little clearer than YAML (certainly less footguns, no) and supports comments unlike JSON.

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                It’s not the language itself that bothers me (it’s a little weird as I would rather use a more-universally-accepted solution, but that’s my personal preference and I do not impose that on anyone else). it’s that it is owned by a company that is known for taking products and making them closed and expensive. This is precisely what companies do, though, and it’s not too surprising. You can get an “enterprise” version of any product hashicorp builds. The question remains: will HCL ever be forced into an “enterprise” category? Will it ever force users to accept a license that they do not agree or pay to use it? YAML/JSON have the advantage of being community-built so I doubt that will ever happen to them.

                                                                                I realize now that I’m grandstanding here and proclaiming the requirement of using FOSS – but I don’t wholeheartedly agree to that. I have no problem using proprietary software (I use several every day, in fact). I’m just remaining a little squinty-eyed at HCL specifically. I don’t know that I could bring myself to choose HCL for tasks at my day job for things that do not inherently require it.

                                                                                That brings me full circle back to my point: be careful, HCL is born from a commercial entity that may not always play nice. Hashicorp has generally in the past, but there are examples of how the companies with the best intentions do not always keep their principles.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Forum software comes to mind.

                                                                            I know it’s not self hosted but there’s also nextdoor.com and your neighbors might already be using it.

                                                                            EDIT: I should have read all of the comments before posting.

                                                                            1. 5

                                                                              There are a lot of people in between the two camps not complaining either way. I want to like Wayland really I do, i3 and thus Sway looked realy slick and I was interested enough to try a few times, but came to the conclusion I don’t want a tiling window mangager (regardless of the stack underneath it - why are almost all compositors tiling?!?).

                                                                              Heres my point of view (all .02 worth of it): Wayland doesn’t do anything that is particlarily better for me. The issues with the X11 code base/protocol are not an issue for me so why shouid I switch? Somethings seem like a step backwards for modularity too eg, every compositor needs to implement XYZ so there’s a lot of duplicated effort (I know… wlroots).

                                                                              But then again, I’m just a 50something curmudgeon that’s been running X11 for over 25 years with a cobbled together workflow using WindowChef, sxhkd and some shell scripts. But Hikari is at least a little intriguing and if it gets (more?) scriptable ala windowchef I would give it another go.