Threads for videogame_hacker

  1. 2

    TL;DR: Tailscale is awesome, but the author does not like the fact that they depend on Google and Microsoft. There are some reasons stated, regarding control that is given to the provider in terms of being able to terminate accounts. The author would prefer if Tailscale did authentication themselves.

    1. 5

      I don’t think Tailscale needs to handle auth data themselves to resolve this, we could have some kinda federated OIDC but then they have to think about abuse and mass-account farming and rate limiting and stuff rather than handing that work off to Microsoft or Google

      1. 5

        I’m not the author but I actually do use headscale personally, but it’s not something I would want to deploy for the entire polycule

        Especially when without any custom frontend work the process for adding new devices is “get the admin to SSH in and add the node”

      1. 7

        Hell yeah

        I think SQLite is very applicable to lots of use-cases and it seems to get less consideration than I think it deserves (although it does get plenty of attention!)

        1. 9

          SQLite JSON functions are also a fairly understated superpower!

          1. 2

            Yes they are, I’ve managed to leverage them and implement a PostgREST compatible api over SQLite [1], i.e. SQLite itself is building the response payload.

            [1] https://github.com/subzerocloud/blue-steel

              1. 1

                Oops, I meant the first one. Fixed!

              2. 1

                If you’re on 3.38 you also get the funny arrow operators :)

            1. 4

              6700 XT user here! I’ve never used the “radeon software for Linux” downloads. On Arch, I install the mesa, libva-mesa-driver, mesa-vdpau, and vulkan-radeon packages: They’re all in core or extra. Then, gaming works just fine with Steam or Minecraft or whatever else.

              1. 17

                SQLite is my go-to for small to medium size webapps that could reasonably run on a single server. It is zero effort to set up. If you need a higher performance DB, you probably need to scale past a single server anyway, and then you have a whole bunch of other scaling issues, where you need a web cache and other stuff anyway.

                1. 5

                  Reasons not to do that are handling backup at a different place than the application, good inspection tools while your app runs, perf optimization things (also “shared” memory usage with one big dbms instance) you can’t do in sqlite and the easier path for migrating to a multi-machine setup. Lastly you’ll also get separation of concerns, allowing you to split up some parts of your up into different permission levels.

                  1. 5

                    Regarding backups: what’s wrong with the .backup command

                    1. 1

                      If I’m reading that right you’ll have to implement that into your application. postgres/mariadb can be backed up (and restored) without any application interaction. Thus it can also be performed by a specialized backup user (making it also a little bit more secure).

                      1. 12

                        As far as I know, you can use the sqlite3 CLI tool to run .backup while your application is still running. I think it’s fine if you have multiple readers while one process is writing to the DB.

                        1. 5

                          Yes, provided you use WAL mode, which you should probably do anyway.

                        2. 7

                          You could use litestream to stream your SQLite changes to local and offsite backups. Works pretty well.

                          1. 7

                            Ok but instead of adding another dependency that solves the shortcomings of not using a DBMS (and I’ll also have to care about) I could instead use a DBMS.

                            1. 6

                              OK, but then you need to administer a DBMS server, with security, performance, testing, and other implications. The point is that there are tradeoffs and that SQLite offers a simple one for many applications.

                              1. 3

                                Not just that, but what exactly are the problems that make someone need a DBMS server? Sqlite3 is thread safe and for remote replication you can just use something like https://www.symmetricds.org/, right? Even then, you can safely store data up to a couple of terabytes in a single Sqlite3 server, too, and it’s pretty fault tolerant by itself. Am I missing something here?

                                1. 2

                                  What does a “single sqlite3 server” mean in the context of an embedded database?

                                  How do you run N copies of your application for HA/operational purposes when the database is “glued with only one instance of the application”?

                                  It’s far from easy in my experience.

                                  1. 2

                                    My experience has been that managing Postgres replication is also far from easy (though to be fair, Amazon will now do this for you if you’re willing to pay for it).

                                  2. 1

                                    SymmetricDS supports many databases and can replicate across different databases, including Oracle, MySQL, MariaDB, PostgreSQL, MS SQL Server (including Azure), IBM DB2 (UDB, iSeries, and zSeries), H2, HSQLDB, Derby, Firebird, Interbase, Informix, Greenplum, SQLite, Sybase ASE, Sybase ASA (SQL Anywhere), Amazon Redshift, MongoDB, and VoltDB databases.

                                    This seems quite remarkable - any experience with it?

                                2. 3

                                  Where do you see the difference between litestream and a tool to backup Postgres/MariaDB? Last time I checked my self-hosted Postgres instance didn’t backup itself.

                                  1. 1

                                    You have a point but nearly every dbms hoster has automatic backups and I know many backup solutions that automate this. I am running stuff only by myself though (no SaaS)

                              2. 6

                                No, it’s fine to open a SQLite database in another process, such as the CLI. And as long as you use WAL mode, a writer doesn’t interrupt a reader, and a reader can use a RO transaction to operate on a consistent snapshot of the database.

                        1. 5

                          Yay, I’ve been using this branch for months to get the Wayland scaling and I’ve had zero problems.

                          1. 7

                            I think that Wayland support is so important that they should cut ASAP Emacs 29 just for it, but probably we’ll have to wait a couple more years for a “stable” release.

                            1. 3

                              Curious what your use case for Wayland is?

                              1. 21

                                I am a Wayland user with a boring desktop use case. I like the:

                                • Fractional DPI scaling (I have a 27” 4K monitor that I like to have somewhere between 1.25x and 1.5x)
                                • Handling of multiple monitors (I have monitors with different desired DPIs and refresh rates)
                                • Lack of screen tearing even with the aforementioned refresh rate mismatch (X11 multihead gives you a single Screen with numerous Displays that view the screen, so you can’t really do VSync with mismatched refresh rates that aren’t simple multiples of each other)
                                • (What feels like?) lower latency: Compositors on X seem to do a lot of copies but Wayland applications seem to have a culture of dmabuf and it seems to make my experience of wayland much snappier when compared to X11 with compton/picom or something.
                                1. 2

                                  I feel that last point. When using X11, it feels like I have a choice between no compositor (and the lack of features and slightly buggy rendering that entails) and compton (with the very bad performance that entails). Workspace switching with i3 would make the every OpenGL window look initially blank before it pops in half a second later when using compton.

                                  Sway, on the other hand, Just Works.

                                  Everything else on that list is important too of course.

                                  1. 3

                                    Curious: what specific features do you like about the compositors? I’ve personally found them completely useless.

                                    1. 2

                                      I don’t remember 100% since it’s a long time ago, but IIRC, a compositor was necessary for reducing screen tearing, and parts of the screen would sometimes fail to update properly without a compositor.

                                      1. 2

                                        Screen tearing is easier to avoid with a compositor (nothing to do) than without. And in my case, true transparency (this helps me to check if a window is focused, but also for eye candy).

                                        1. 1

                                          Even if you don’t care about shiny stuff like shadows, you don’t need damage.

                                      2. 2

                                        X can do all those things too, except maybe the refresh rate thing though, I’m not sure about that. It is a pity that applications are just rewriting in Wayland instead of fixing their bugs on X and maintaining full compatibility.

                                        1. 5

                                          X11 can’t really avoid screen tearing. There are lots of different hacks which each somewhat reduce tearing in certain situations, but I’ve yet to see an X11 system which doesn’t have at least some screen tearing in at least some circumstances – while I’ve yet to see a Wayland system with screen tearing issues.

                                          Fractional scaling on X11 is a hack which partially works sometimes but doesn’t work perfectly.

                                          We’re long overdue for an X11 replacement. We’ve been adding hacks upon hacks upon hacks for far too long, and the fundamental limitations are really starting to show. It’s not enough to “just fix application bugs on X”. Screen tearing by itself is enough reason to throw X11 in the garbage and start fresh with something that’s actually reasonably well designed.

                                          1. 1

                                            As far as I understand, X cannot have different fractional scaling factors for different monitors, while Wayland can. It’s the main motivation for me to use Wayland, given I have a 1440p 25’ and 2160p 27’.

                                          2. 1

                                            I was always curious about fractional scaling. I thought that Wayland didn’t handle it (see https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/wayland/wayland-protocols/-/issues/47). From my understanding, you are rendering at 2x, then downscaling. If you happen to have two monitors, this can be a lot of pixels to render.

                                            1. 1

                                              From my understanding, you are rendering at 2x, then downscaling.

                                              This is how macOS does it, IIRC.

                                              1. 1

                                                I think there are non-mainline GDK protocols for it. At least all the non-XWayland applications I use look perfectly crisp

                                            2. 12

                                              For me personally, I use Wayland because it’s the only thing supported on my hardware (MNT Reform).

                                              The only thing I use it for is to run XWayland so I can immediately launch Emacs and exwm, and then I run Firefox inside that.

                                              At first glance it appears slower than using Wayland directly, but that’s only before you factor in the time you have to spend retrieving your laptop because you threw it out the window in rage because Firefox’s keybindings (when running outside exwm) are so bad and holding down C-n opened seventeen windows again instead of scrolling down.

                                              1. 1

                                                Doesn’t Firefox run directly with Wayland now?

                                                1. 1

                                                  Probably, but if you run Firefox outside exwm there’s no way to fix the key bindings. The Firefox extension mechanism bans rebinding C-n and C-p for “security reasons”, making it completely unusable for me.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Supposedly it does https://twitter.com/omgubuntu/status/1379818974532280321?s=20, but I guess exwm doesn’t.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      Yeah. I guess exwm is the problem and not Firefox.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        No, the problem is that Firefox doesn’t allow the user to change some keybindings, like C-n. EXWM is the solution to that problem.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          It’s exactly this.

                                                    2. 1

                                                      For a while now already. Gotta define the MOZ_ENABLE_WAYLAND=1 env variable and it will start in Wayland mode. Have been doing this for 2(?) years now on Sway without issue. (Maybe the env thing is a thing of the past…)

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Sway + Firefox here as well. MOZ_ENABLE_WAYLAND=1 is no longer needed. Rejoice!

                                                  2. 8

                                                    I’m surprised by your question. My (perhaps naive?) understanding is that the Xorg maintainers decided years ago that they don’t like the X protocol anymore for modern graphics stacks, that the stuff that was added on top of it is painful to design/implement/maintain, and that they wanted to start with something fresh with a more solid design. Wayland, as I understand it, this is “something fresh with a more solid design” (but its own protocols are still evolving and probably imperfect, as everything is.)

                                                    With this understanding, if I have the choice to use both (that is, I’m not depending on worklows that are not supported on Wayland for fundamental reason (no support for easy forwarding) or due to lack of maturity), it seems natural to use Wayland. I want to use the new stuff that is the future and benefits from a growing userbase to mature (and benefit more users that currently have fewer options), and not the old stuff that keeps working but people dread maintaining.

                                                    So: my use case is “moving to the new software stack that was designed from the start to be a better, more robust successor than the old software stack”.

                                                    1. 6

                                                      From my PoV Wayland is still in “second system redesign” territory like the early days of PulseAudio. Some people find it useful, some people like to help test the bleeding edge, but it’s not the default in anything I set up and since I’ve never had any issues with X I don’t currently go through the extra work to set it up. The only time I’ve worked with Wayland was to help my mom switch her computer back to X because some app was misbehaving under her Wayland setup.

                                                      But if it’s working for you, that’s great of course. Just providing my PoV so hopefully my question is less surprising now.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        There is always a bias towards “not fixing what aint broken” so once you know a tool you’re likely to stick to it.

                                                        That being said I don’t think wayland represents enough progress to consider it a successor to X, it’s a competitor for sure but I think by the time I move off X it won’t be to wayland.

                                                        1. 5

                                                          With most Linux distros gradually switching to Wayland and Windows adopting it as well for WSL, I think it’s fairly certain that Wayland is going to (mostly) replace X in the next 3-5 years. I doubt some other alternative will emerge before the transition to Wayland is complete.

                                                    2. 5

                                                      Desktops built on Wayland are amazing compared to desktops built on X11. I couldn’t go back anymore.

                                                1. 2

                                                  g and h are pretty much the functions I’ve been writing when I do vanilla JS projects. I find it really comfy!

                                                  I also do a shorthand for ‘addEventListener’ as well, which I find really useful.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    Yes, I do something similar except I make g into $ instead to remind myself of the days of jQuery. I have an element wrapper tool in $e because I simply couldn’t think of anything better or mnemonic. Cadey’s h looks far more advanced than my simple one-liner for document.createElement!

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                                                    Does this mean type-checking in rust is about to become turing complete?

                                                    1. 7

                                                      It already was, but there’s a stack limit

                                                      1. 5

                                                        Practically, procedural macros are in every way worse for compilers.

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                                                        I’m actively refusing to use the ‘folder’ terminology, because I’ve probably never seen a real folder in real life. I prefer to use a virtual description: directory. However, I originally was accustomed to the concept by using the word drawer, because that’s what was used on Amigas. Drawer is much more fun than a folder, because it can store big objects ;)

                                                        1. 7

                                                          directory

                                                          This is not a virtual description. A “directory” is a structured list of information, such as a telephone directory.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            I’m actively refusing to use the ‘folder’ terminology, because I’ve probably never seen a real folder in real life.

                                                            Do you not use these tings to keep important documents around? https://eu-browse.startpage.com/av/anon-image?piurl=https%3A%2F%2Fcdn.officecentre.de%2Fassets%2Fscaled%2F9d%2Fasset.4863473.1500x1500.box-245c4a9f.jpg&sp=1632391488Ta170e4937b5ac48795fc5e117244b6dbd58d645ef9f6b7654c3a78bd8a72a22f

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                                                              Hi, I’m 20.

                                                              Most of my important documents are PDFs. I have one thin plastic envelope that stores important physical documents, like… basically just my examination certificates and my birth certificate.

                                                              • My apartment’s lease and agreement are virtual,
                                                              • almost all my bank statements and bills are paperless
                                                              • My employment contracts are virtual

                                                              et cetera.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                I’m using it, though I know it by other name – “segregator” in my language, which according to some random translation website translates more or less to “binder” ;)

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                                                              I enjoyed this, it’s a great overview and I got a lot of utility out of where this post links to for deeper reading.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                I would suggest adding Javascript support. Lots of people in web dev would love such a tool.

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                                                                  It’s supported by TreeSitter, so I’m guessing the exclusion is explicit.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    You would need to grab the JavaScript grammar for tree-sitter and declare it in build.rs, but then it should just work.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  I have always thought “I should get into NixOS”, but people seem to have gripes with the Nix configuration language and I am really comfortable running Alpine on the small boxes I have.

                                                                  Do you think the tools that are made available are worth the learning curve? ilo Alpine li pona

                                                                  1. 20

                                                                    I used NixOS for a while on my laptop. It’s certainly worth trying, and not very difficult to install.

                                                                    Setting up services, tinkering with the main config, is easy enough.

                                                                    But if you want to go deeper than that, you’ll spend hours searching other people’s configuration because the documentation is poor.

                                                                    1. 5

                                                                      Ugh, yes, this is my single #1 complaint with the infrastructure by far. The poor documentation. I need to start taking notes and contributing back to the wiki.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Seems like Guix might be an option. At least they didn’t create a brand new configuration language..

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                                                                          At least they didn’t create a brand new configuration language..

                                                                          Note that although Guix didn’t create new syntax (they use lisp), you’d still need to learn the “language” defined by the Guix libraries. In the end, most of your time is spent figuring out Nix/Guix libraries, and very little time is spent on programming-language things like branching and arithmetic

                                                                          1. 5

                                                                            The biggest annoyances I’ve run into with Nix-as-a-language are the lack of static types and the fact that it doesn’t really have good support for managing state. The latter doesn’t usually present a problem, but occasionally if you want to generate a config file in a certain way it can be annoying.

                                                                            But I think it helps that I already knew Haskell, so all the stuff like laziness and the syntax are super familiar.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              There really isn’t much of a “language” to learn. Guix configurations use scheme records for about 90 of any configuration a user will do and the rest is in g-expressions which is something like a new syntax that takes the place of embedded shell scripts in nix.

                                                                        2. 8

                                                                          On one hand, Nix is terrible. On the other hand, isn’t everything else worse? Guix is the only decent comparison, and personally I think Nix’s technical decisions are better. (So do they, given that they borrow the Nix store’s design wholesale!)

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            How can they be better, if they are the same?

                                                                          2. 6

                                                                            NixOS is amazingly good for writing appliances. It also can be made to barf out docker images, which is nice.

                                                                            1. 6

                                                                              Coming from Void Linux, NixOS on a desktop machine… ilo NixOS li pona ala, la pali mute. It’s a lot of work for a functioning desktop, I think. But on the server NixOS is killer and fun, and makes configuration suuuuper simple. I only need my /etc/nixos and /src folders to migrate my server anywhere (though I’d have to bring along /data to keep my state).

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                This is basically what I do. When I got my new laptop I considered Nix, but decided to stick with Arch because it was easier. I use NixOS for my Digitalocean nodes and am very glad I did.

                                                                              2. 1

                                                                                tl;dr: No, I went back to Void on the desktop and Alpine/Ubuntu on servers in almost all contexts

                                                                                Purely anecdotal: I was all-in on Nix, both at home and at work, and drank copious amounts of the kool-aid.

                                                                                As of today, it still runs on a few machines I’m too lazy to reformat, but it’s gone from all my interactive machines, and from all functions (be it NixOS on EC2, or Nix shells for developer workstations) at work.

                                                                                My takeaway was basically: Nix(OS) makes 90% of things absolutely trivial, the next 8% significantly more difficult, and the remaining 2% anywhere from nightmarish to downright impossible. That latter 10% made it “cost” significantly more than, say, investing in other version locking tooling for developer workstations at work. At home, that remaining 10% just meant that I didn’t do some things (like play many Steam games) that I would otherwise have enjoyed doing, because I didn’t have the energy to dive in.

                                                                              1. 5
                                                                                $ touch '--no-preserve-root / foo' 'foo'
                                                                                $ rm $(ls | grep foo)
                                                                                
                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                  This thread is making me feel very young - I was born in 2000, so I think the earliest presence I have on the web are some bamzooki [niche UK children’s tech … thing?] forum postings that I made when I was about 7, or early Roblox games that I made when I was 8. I don’t really want to see that stuff again.

                                                                                  It’d be between ’06 and ’09, which is, like, recent.

                                                                                  1. 5

                                                                                    I daily-carry both an iPhone 12 mini and a OnePlus 8 Pro.

                                                                                    The iPhone:

                                                                                    • fits in my (tiny) womens’ clothes pockets, whereas the big Pro Android phone goes in a bag,
                                                                                    • works fantastically with my AirPods,
                                                                                    • could support an Apple Watch if I decide to buy one - It seems like a major convenience boost!
                                                                                    • lets me use iMessage (although, living in Europe, I haven’t, yet.),
                                                                                    • can run GarageBand for noting down rough-and-fleeting musical inspiration

                                                                                    The Android phone:

                                                                                    • has important things on it that I need to access when I’m out-and-about (2FA codes, mostly)
                                                                                    • takes nice photos from the selfie camera,
                                                                                    • can run Syncthing, and has a real filesystem.
                                                                                    • can run Conversations, but iOS doesn’t have any XMPP client that comes close,
                                                                                    • has actual web browser choice: Firefox is actually Firefox, and I can block ads.
                                                                                    • lets me develop custom software to automate daily stuff, really easily.

                                                                                    I wouldn’t say two phones provides two times the utility, but it really comes in handy to get around the tradeoffs & exclusivity sometimes.

                                                                                    1. 4

                                                                                      I’m gonna be playing with Android development. Gonna experiment with making an Android app for a self-made service that I use every day.

                                                                                      1. 5

                                                                                        Have fun and welcome to the hell of Android development :).

                                                                                        Some pro tips:

                                                                                        • You’re better off reading the latest docs from Google, not some outdated tutorial that absolutely will break under the latest SDK (it happens way too often)
                                                                                        • Get familiar with the Gradle build system
                                                                                        • Look into https://developer.android.com/jetpack once you get familiar with the SDK. It simplifies a lot of things.
                                                                                        • Use Kotlin instead of Java, the overhead is minimal (Kotlin runtime adds ~1MB to the apk size)
                                                                                        • If you want to look something up, do it on Github instead of Google, you’ll get much higher quality results
                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                          I’ve been looking into using Flutter because I don’t have to piss around with XML to make UIs that way.

                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                              There is also Jetpack Compose if you want something native-to-Android but it’s… kinda finicky.

                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                Good choice! I haven’t done much Flutter development (not very keen on Dart), but last time I tried it, it was very easy to set up and use.

                                                                                          1. 7

                                                                                            Discord basically already serves this function with how easy it is to spin up and invite people to servers. Spawning channels within the server to focus on specific topics keeps the conversation focused. Sure, people frequently get invited to or join servers that are just too noisy to function, and they invariably get all traffic muted (and therefore fall into disuse) but I’m on a handful of servers that are just friends and they manage to keep my attention.

                                                                                            There’s stuff in this post that just doesn’t matter to people.

                                                                                            Per the post:

                                                                                            you control the computer that runs the site

                                                                                            you can modify the software that powers the site

                                                                                            you get to make the rules and policies

                                                                                            Nobody (at large) gives a shit about those first two things. Some of my friends might be convinced to get on some of the self-hosted social media options, but only because I bully them into it, not because they care that I would be the one administrating it. People really only need the third point, and discord already provides that agency. Any platform that lets you self-congregate does.

                                                                                            The main reason to run a small social network site is that you can create an online environment tailored to the needs of your community in a way that a big corporation like Facebook or Twitter never could.

                                                                                            You know what the needs of my community are? Posting text, links, and images. End of list. I’m sure there’s some communities out there with specialized needs, but I’d be interested to hear why existing solutions don’t meet them.

                                                                                            Your small social network site can have its own rules about, for example:

                                                                                            what speech is acceptable

                                                                                            what actions are considered violence

                                                                                            what actions are considered protected speech or expression

                                                                                            Ah. I see where this is going.

                                                                                            1. 6

                                                                                              Discord basically already serves this function with how easy it is to spin up and invite people to servers.

                                                                                              I read the Discord privacy policy when LLVM started talking about it and there’s absolutely no way that I’d agree to it. Discourse is a lot better in this regard: the privacy policy for hosted instances is pretty reasonable and the system is open source so you can run your own if you disagree with it.

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                                                                                                Ah. I see where this is going.

                                                                                                And where’s that? I think that’s the best part about running your own social network. Discord on the other hand, is known to censor — both users, and entire communities that they deem as “bad”. They can literally nuke your “server” (that word still gets me) off the site without reason.

                                                                                                1. 4

                                                                                                  I’m going to go out on a limb and guess the communities they deem “bad” aren’t “bad” in scare quotes, but actually bad and harmful communities.

                                                                                                  Like, say, this kind.

                                                                                                  1. 8

                                                                                                    If you want an example of the company’s moral code getting in the way of non-hateful communication, I have been personally affected by Discord’s ban on game hacking discussion & promotion.

                                                                                                    I would hardly call distributing trainer programs harmful.

                                                                                                    Ultimately, it’s their platform. I still use Discord regularly, and it’s easy to convince an already-technical group to switch to Matrix, which works just fine.

                                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                                      Would you say most NSFW communities are bad and harmful? Because Discord censors them on iOS. (Telegram doesn’t, there is a switch on Telegram Web to enable this kind of content on iOS.)

                                                                                                1. 5

                                                                                                  I remember a few domains with A records at the top level; I think dk had one at some point

                                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                                    Correct. You used to be able to type “dk.” in a browser and you would then be redirected to the website of DK Hostmaster who manages the .dk TLD.

                                                                                                    I found it to be quite useful as a quick way to get to their site.

                                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                                    Thanks for this, Raph. GPGPU, to me, has seemed fairly difficult to get into (especially with the fragmentation).

                                                                                                    I’ve been interested in the work done under the linebender umbrella for a while now, too. It’s nice to see some good lessons come out of some already-good development work.

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                                                                                                      I am going to be doing a talk about systemd at AlpineConf. Tune in at noon EDT to rustle all the jimmies into orbit!

                                                                                                      1. 4

                                                                                                        Ooh, the lion’s den. Wear asbestos undergarments.

                                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                                          I’m just sad I forgot to order popcorn from the grocery store.

                                                                                                        2. 1

                                                                                                          Do you know if there will be recordings of the talks? I’d love to check this out

                                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                                            I know that my talk at least is already recorded and I’m going to push the slides and notes live as soon as the talk starts. I think the other talks are prerecorded as well. I’d suggest asking in #alpine-conf on Freenode for exact details though.

                                                                                                          2. 1

                                                                                                            Interesting. The majority of use cases of alpine I have seen was as a base for docker containers due to its size. Since you can’t run systemd inside a container, this does not matter much for that crowd. Do you see many people running alpine as the main OS on their servers?

                                                                                                            I ran an alpine/arm tor node for a while, but that was not the most stable machin I ever had. I may have been the hardware though.

                                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                                              I run Alpine as the main OS for my servers – The package management is blazing-fast, the init system is out of my way (I stick to the happy path, but I’m sure it’s flexible.), and I keep the system minimal.

                                                                                                              When I need to run something that requires a heavier environment, I can stick it in a Docker container, and give it an image that’s based on another distro.

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                                                                                                                I used to run Alpine as the main OS on my servers for many years. I even did a few production deployments with it. Docker certainly made Alpine a lot more popular overnight for bandwidth reasons though!