Threads for weberc2

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    I did a similar thing for my static blog. Originally, my bespoke static site generator (neon) was implemented in Go, and I used github.com/gorilla/feeds for the atom support (link to my go.mod file). I since rewrote my static site generator in Rust (I learn new languages by writing static site generators, and when I like an implementation I promote it to production), where I use the atom_syndication crate. link to Cargo.toml.

    My blog is here and the feed should be machine- and human-discoverable (the blog itself is not very useful, my hobby is building and hosting the blog rather than writing posts). I’ve also found that the w3c hosts a feed validator which is helpful for implementing these things.

    EDIT: Also, I just subscribed to your blog, so it seems the machine-discoverability stuff works! If anyone else has blogs about hobby-hacking or self-hosting, I would love to get links (I hope it’s not considered “self promotion” if it’s solicited?).

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      I did one thing more to my feed, added XSLT that produces more or less readable HTML output of it (see https://hauleth.dev/atom.xml, full link to show that it is “raw XML”). AFAIK all modern browsers (tested on Safari and Fx) support XSLT for XML files out of the box it is nice feature as it makes the feed readable for both - machines and people.

      My feed is above, I do not write much, but I try my best.

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        That’s super cool, I didn’t know that was an option. How does your site work? Static site generator? Server side rendering? In either case, what’s your stack?

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          I use Zola for static rendering. Whole source is there - https://github.com/hauleth/hauleth. Hosting is done via Netlify with few plugins (webmentions and sitemap publishing). Website is rebuilt each 4h to update webmentions if any. So it is static, but with semi-dynamic parts.

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          The Atlantic strangely has a really good XSLT last time I checked.

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          woohoo! I haven’t used RSS before, so it’s good to get confirmation from someone who has. :) Your blog seems interesting, I can subscribe back too.

          It seems like a lot of folks have shared their RSS/Atom implementations, presumably those would be a good starting point.

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          An RSS (or ATOM) feed is so easy to implement you can fit it on probably 1/3rd of letter paper (as I’ve done in one of my posts). I really encourage everyone to make their website subscribeable! 🙂 It’d be nice instead of “enter your email” or “subscribe to me on X” we can eventually say “here’s my feed ” :D The author did a good job at reinforcing how simple it is.

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            I wonder if someone could make some middleware that grabs s with a particular ID and generates a feed, including updating the HTML to insert the element? Seems a bit contrived (especially as you mention that the specs themselves aren’t complicated), but it’s an interesting thought exercise.

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            Very minor point, but this has come up a dozen times since Go 1.18 was released:

            we want to write a program which is concurrent, does not share memory, and nowadays - might use polymorphism.

            It seems like lately everyone thinks polymorphism == parametric polymorphism, but Go interfaces are polymorphic, right (subtype polymorphism)? As are first class functions (i.e., two different closures with the same signature can be passed into an argument whose type is a function with the same signature)?

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              Hiking in Colorado (I’m from the midwest so mountains are pretty damn exciting, not least because you can beat the heat by climbing to a higher elevation, which is a wizardry we don’t have back home). Would also like to do some work on my blog (finish my refactor of the auth system for my comments engine, or maybe write a new post–not sure yet).

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                I would love for SREs or SWEs to be able to operate a database without a DBA. Needing to know Patroni, PGBackrest, PGBouncer, and all of the upgrade ceremony is a really steep ask. Yeah, it’s great that there are managed offerings on cloud providers that abstract all of this, but it would be even better if this beat abstraction was built into Postgres directly.

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                  I would love for SREs or SWEs to be able to operate a database without a DBA.

                  Uh…we can? I’ve never in my career worked anywhere that employed a DBA or even idly discussed attempting to hire one – maintaining a production PG cluster is more or less firmly just part of the “backend software engineer” or at best SRE job description, as a rule.

                  I was rather under the impression that outside of a few dusty IBM DB2 or w/e installations, “DBA” as a career was utterly and completely dead.

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                    The only times I’ve worked at a company without dedicated DBA(s) are when the company was too small to afford one.

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                      I think this has much more to do with engineering culture than size. Our database management transitioned over time from backend engineers to a proper SRE team, but there are still no DBAs in the company and we definitely are more than large enough to afford one.

                      The way in which you are getting Postgres also matters. A managed cloud service is a lot easier to upgrade than a self-hosted DB.

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                        Admittedly some of these have been quite small (early stage startups aren’t going to splurge on someone just to babysit the DB) – but still, small-mid-size companies (profitable, growing, $10s mil revenue, 20-some people in the engineering dept, certainly not incapable of hiring someone if there’d been interest in it, but there was none) and a couple truly large orgs (10k employees, both centralized and with some embedded IT depts), zero DBAs at any of them (the largest org had shitcanned all of the Oracle DBAs a few years before I started my career as part of a transition to open-source DBs – kind of set the tone for my career). All of these were self-hosting PG (and MySQL) on-prem (large orgs) or in something like Linode or (later) AWS.

                        The reality is I struggle to see the justification for a non-code contributing role like this; while it might be nice (as a dev) to imagine that I could offload all of the responsibility for thinking about the DB to someone else, the reality is just that as a backend engineer I still need so much visibility into the DB that paying someone just to wrangle config and servers when I need to be in the loop on those kinds of changes, regardless, because they feed back into the app architecture and performance, doesn’t make sense to me.

                        Maybe it’s just cultural, but it feels like I’d be abdicating important responsibilities (and the ability to do my job as well as I can) if I weren’t capable of tuning work_mem and temp_buffers etc to be synergistic with the kinds of data I’m working with and the queries I’m writing against it, or if I weren’t making the calls on the cluster architecture and how the rest of the app connects to it, fails over, etc.

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                          Yep, same here. I also wonder how a DBA would even be able to get anything done - on the one hand you have the backend engineers who need to optimize their queries in a way that the application still works properly (and grok all the interactions between different sessions) and on the other hand you have the sysadmins who you need to bug to get the Postgres settings changed (as with fully automated declarative deployments and such).

                          Between the two roles (of backend dev and sysadmin), this should divide all the tasks you’d typically hire a DBA for.

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                            Also in my experience: DBAs are subject-matter experts for databases. They spend a lot of time reading application code with an eye towards either changing the database to handle the application better, or changing the application to perform better on the database.

                            Do you really only think of DBAs as Oracle-programmed configure-monkeys?

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                              Do you really only think of DBAs as Oracle-programmed configure-monkeys?

                              No, but at the same time, I wouldn’t call someone who’s equipped to actually change the application code a DBA, either. You can be a backend dev with a heavy DB focus, but a DBA is typically non-code-contributing.

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                                This is the sort of tiny boxes that make talking about organizations so painful.

                                A (junior, intermediate, senior) DBA is a person developing expertise in databases. A (junior, intermediate, senior) sysadmin is developing expertise in deployment and operations. The senior folks in these specialties always end up being good in a few languages. Are they particularly focused on web technologies or UX or QA or business logic? No, those are different specializations. But it is entirely reasonable to ask your DBA to consult on programming problems and expect that the answer might be to change your program just as much as it might be to change your database.

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                                  But it is entirely reasonable to ask your DBA to consult on programming problems and expect that the answer might be to change your program just as much as it might be to change your database.

                                  Really don’t know what it is you’re trying to argue with here, but I’d simply say that you’d be better off spending that salary on someone who could lead (and share, and help juniors develop) that knowledge within the dev team and make those changes directly in the codebase on a daily basis (and make those recommendations directly in Code Reviews), rather than spend it on some guru external to the developers who devs periodically go to for “change the program” answers that come from someone without the requisite skills to change the codebase directly, and therefore without an understanding of the actual constraints on the changes they’re recommending in a vacuum.

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                          I was rather under the impression that outside of a few dusty IBM DB2 or w/e installations, “DBA” as a career was utterly and completely dead

                          Definitely not. Not all backend engineers can analyze the queries they write and their impact on the system. Nor SREs. At certain amounts of data you need someone dedicated to the system internals to make it work for you.

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                            I don’t know. I’ve never worked anywhere that operated our own postgres clusters rather than using RDS, Cloud SQL, etc.

                            I was rather under the impression that outside of a few dusty IBM DB2 or w/e installations, “DBA” as a career was utterly and completely dead.

                            Me too, but I thought that was because everyone else was running RDS, etc.

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                              Most of those are too new for a lot of businesses to be using them (RDS PostgreSQL only came out in 2017) - if you’ve already got a well-tuned, stable PG setup switching it over to Amazon RDS just to pay them a lot more money (not to mention the loss of control over things like maintenance windows and version upgrade timing) to be where you already are isn’t all that appealing.

                              Those services are fine, generally, but if you let them convince you you can’t do it yourself you’re missing a lot of knowledge about the internals of your tools which, at least for a backend dev, will come back to bite you in the ass in the long run.

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                                I mean, new businesses start new projects all the time (such that one project could be on a manually-managed Postgres cluster and another on RDS), and many have moved from their own data centers to cloud providers in that span of time. But I agree with you that there are probably a lot of manually managed Postgres clusters out there too; however, it’s not evident to me that these are run by SREs or SWEs rather than DBAs or DBEs or other database specialists.

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                                  A lot of shops run their own Postgres. In many cases, performance isn’t that much of a concern (think your average CMS or CRM solution that uses Postgres for its backend), and in cases where it is, often the developers or sysadmins learn on the job and make it scale (because they have to).

                                  At least in the companies where I’ve worked we made bespoke business software which always ran on our own VPSes, and maintenance and tuning of the Postgres database was a shared responsibility between the backend devs (i.e. the team I was in) and the sysadmin. So the only bit that’s “cloud” would be the plain VPS (which sometimes would run on our own bare metal as well). The actual “cloud” offerings usually are too rigid in what you can install/control (custom db extensions? hell no!) or too damned expensive compared to just running it yourself (especially for small projects).

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                                    I mean, new businesses start new projects all the time (such that one project could be on a manually-managed Postgres cluster and another on RDS),

                                    Yeah that does happen. It also goes the opposite way; we had an old MySQL-using app on RDS but they discontinued the version it was using and testing turned up some weirdness on the next supported version. Wasn’t worth the manpower to fix so we just set it up with MySQL on a regular VM. Like I said, sometimes control over upgrade timing is more important.

                                    But I agree with you that there are probably a lot of manually managed Postgres clusters out there too; however, it’s not evident to me that these are run by SREs or SWEs rather than DBAs or DBEs or other database specialists.

                                    Well I’m mostly telling you this as a senior backend dev whose worked in a bunch of places where we hosted our own PG cluster as backend devs with nary a DBA in sight, friends with many other backend devs with similar responsibilities and never even heard tell of a shop that employed a DBA etc.

                                    Maybe these places exist but I’d say there’s probably 50 “Maintain the database? That’s your job as a backend dev” places for any one “yeah we have a DBA” shops (which again, I’ve never actually heard of outside this thread).

                                    Reality is unless your PG cluster is absolutely gargantuan it doesn’t really take much work. Genuinely not sure what they’d do all day.

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                              Yeah, it’s great that there are managed offerings on cloud providers that abstract all of this

                              There are, but not really on the big ones. Look up their upgrade guides, they either make this complicated, require you to essentially do the same step or simply require you to dump and restore, but don’t even allow you to do that with users and such things, making it a more complicated and requiring a lot more downtime than it usually would (GCP).

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                              This all sounds really great, except this bit:

                              And on a related node, recently publish packages can be replaced with gleam publish –replace. This is useful for correcting any mistakes made during the process of releasing a package.

                              Does that mean the content of a particular version of a package can change? (Also I think there’s a typo “recent published packages”?)

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                                This is a feature of Hex (a package manager for all BEAM modules (erlang, elixir, gleam, etc)). The time limits are quite short so there should be very little danger:

                                There are exceptions to the immutability rule, a package can be changed or unpublished within 60 minutes of the package version release or within 24 hours of initial release of the package.

                                https://hex.pm/docs/faq#can-packages-be-removed-from-the-repository

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                                  That’s neat !

                                  I wish PyPI had this: these kind of small release mistakes can happen very easily.

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                                    Ahh ok. The time limits make it a bit less concerning.

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                                      Packages also come with checksums so the tooling will identify a change compared to what is expected in the lockfile.

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                                    While we’re pointing out typos: s/related node/related note

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                                    There’s no Upstairs daemon or anything like that, it all stays in-process.

                                    How does this work? If the replication and everything is managed by the application, what happens if multiple application instances write to the same data concurrently? How do they coordinate?

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                                      Considering that the use-case for Crucible in oxide is VM backing storage, which would normally have only one writing instance, that isn’t considered a problem that needs to be solved by them.

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                                        I have been pretty involved in the design of Crucible, and you’re totally correct. We’ve been able to avoid a whole lot of distributed systems issues by having just one client, the hypervisor to which the virtual disk is attached. We’ve been able to focus mostly on the crash safety properties of the storage format without needing a complex consensus or coordination strategy.

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                                      If more people understood HTML, they would stop using Markdown incorrectly—such as using blockquotes for callouts and admonitions instead of for quoting a body of work, or figures + figcaptions, definiton lists instead of unordered lists with heading elements. Ironic that developers tease people for using WYSIWYG editors improperly—like <b> for headings and excessive <br> tags and &nbsp;—and then misuse their lightweight markup syntaxes.

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                                        If I could give young developers one piece of advice, it would be this:

                                        Reading the manual or the standard or the RFC or whatever the definitive documentation is for the tools that you use is a super-power.

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                                          As soon as markdown provides me with callout and admonition formats, (or even a reasonable standard way of defining them myself) I’ll be happy to fix that.

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                                            Pretty sure markdown is a superset of HTML, but I don’t see how HTML would solve that problem? Is there an <admonition> tag?

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                                              We had something similar way back, but sadly the “blink” element has since been deprecated…

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                                                Ah, fond memories of <marquee> :’D

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                                                Even if it did, escaping to HTML isn’t my idea of a reasonable way – if I wanted HTML I’d be using it, not markdown. It’s a usable kludge/escape hatch when you need it, but html in markdown isn’t a solution.

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                                                  The original Markdown allowed HTML because the point of the original Markdown was to eliminate the tedious bits of HTML when authoring blog posts, not to replace HTML entirely.

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                                                    I know why it’s there… my point was that if the goal is to eliminate said tedium, and there’s a markdown format code that generates the output I want without it, why would I go back to html for some purported semantic purity.

                                                    Aside from that, the current reality of markdown has strayed considerably from that original point, and now many uses of it no longer support html at all or significantly restrict it.

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                                                      To each their own I guess. I have my own markup language I use for blogging [1] and it has support for generating tables (some example tables). But it doesn’t support all the semantics of HTML tables, and when I need those (like this example) the ability to drop down into actual HTML is nice. Did I go back to HTML for some purported semantic purity? I don’t think so, but you may think differently. And would I go to the trouble to try to support all of HTML’s table semantics in my markup language? No way. For me, it’s rare enough that I stray from the general table format (of the first example) that supporting other formats would be a waste of time—the occasional “drop down to HTML markup” doesn’t bother me that much.

                                                      [1] I don’t store the post entries in this format, but in the final HTML output, mainly because I want the ability to change the markup language if some aspect annoys me. I’ve already made multiple changes. I’m also not forcing others to use this format, since it’s really geared towards my own usage.

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                                                        Did I go back to HTML for some purported semantic purity? I don’t think so, but you may think differently

                                                        Sorry, didn’t mean to imply that’s what you were doing… rather just referring to my original point upthread: I see no issue at all using markdown blockquotes when they give me the formatting I want even though an html aside might be “more correct” but at the expense of having to write all the html and css to achieve the same thing.

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                                                          I love that you support <abbr> where most other tools don’t

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                                                            Thank you. I still don’t know how to handle the following case [1]: “While the IRA may take actions against US interests that would effect Alice’s (a member of the IRA) IRA, can an automated process work out which expansion of IRA [2] should be used for each instance?” But so far, that’s been an extreme outlier case and rarely comes up.

                                                            [1] From http://boston.conman.org/2003/11/19.2

                                                            [2] For the record: Irish Republican Army, International Reading Association, Individual Retirement Account.

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                                                  Psst you can use use AsciiDoc most places you’d use Markdown and get that ability plus extra benefits.

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                                                    Yeah, AsciiDoc and ReST were both better options than markdown, imho… but I eventually gave in to the overwhelming adoption markdown got.

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                                                      I mean your own projects you can undermine the hegemony with said better options

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                                                  such as using blockquotes for callouts and admonitions

                                                  Is this a correct use of blockquote? If not, why? And what’s the proper alternative?

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                                                    “aside” might be an appropriate element to use, if “callout” means something like what I’d call a pull-quote. If the text flows with its surroundings, maybe just a class on a regular paragraph would be sufficient.

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                                                    Huh! I might look into using figures and figcaption in my markdown; I’m already using html anyway for svg with png fallback. Thanks!

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                                                    Kicking off a few weeks in Denver.

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                                                      This was a weird article. It dived into how each iteration of infrastructure solved problems associated with the previous generation, but then it just leaves us with a couple of terse sentences that frame shuttle as the next Heroku with no explanation for which problems it aims to solve or how (just some stuff about how much they love Rust). Specifically, how does Shuttle infer infrastructure?

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                                                        With Japanese we could still write variable names in Hiragana, Katakana or Kanji 🤔

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                                                          Also the Roman alphabet and Arabic numerals! Plus emoji, Japan’s orthographic gift to the world 🎏🗿💮

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                                                            FULL width is also a thing 🤭

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                                                              ハンカクカナモアルンデス。

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                                                              Didn’t we have emoticons like a decade before emoji became popular (in the west, anyway)? Weren’t those functionally emojis (albeit not part of unicode, but I’m guessing the earliest emojis weren’t either). Anyone know for sure?

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                                                                The first emoji were made for Japanese cellphones in 1997, by which time English emoticons had existed for a decade or so. Japan even had their own variations on emoticons like ^_^.

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                                                                  What I remember from that time is being mind blown by how Japanese had taken emoji to a whole new level, breaking free of the idea that eyes were always “:” and that faces were always sideways.

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                                                                    I remember chat clients and forums would let you put actual smileys inline with text. It wasn’t ascii.

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                                                            Teaching myself more about the gorgeous simplicity of the Atari 8 bit architecture and re-learning the Action! programming language through this excellent Youtube series.

                                                            If I manage to squeeze out even more time I hope to dig my Raspberry Pi 4 out of storage and install Uptime Kuma on it since we lost wifi to half our apartment without realizing it for a few days :)

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                                                              Man, RPI4s are worth their weight in gold these days. I’ve been trying to get one at retail price for upwards of 6 months now, but at this point it’s more cost effective to get a Mac Mini (M1) for a low-power server.

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                                                                Yeah this chip shortage is turning things upside down :(

                                                                We’ll just look forward to 2026 I guess? :)

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                                                              Learning CSS Flexbox and writing my static site generator using Python, Jinja2, and Tailwind and using it to generate my blog.

                                                              It is entertaining to use something I am familiar with (Python) and some not to make things.

                                                              Outside of tech: Finally, Shanghai lifted the lockdown restriction after two months. Time for running!

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                                                                Static site generator is my favorite way to learn a new language. It’s a good tour through filesystem APIs and third party libraries (for templating, markdown, etc) while being more complex than a toy but simple enough to crank out in a weekend or three depending on your proficiency. So far I’ve done this with Python, Go, and Rust, the latter of which is currently building my blog in production.

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                                                                  Very happy to know someone has the same thought about this :D

                                                                  Plus, it is very extensible for learning - for the initial version, I will just focus on making it minimum viable by using lots of existing tools and third-party libraries. If I am interested in a specific topic, I can replace the library (e.g. YAML or Markdown parser) with my version.

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                                                                  Very cool that you’re rolling your own! So many incredible libraries to choose from that will help a lot :)

                                                                  I’ve been using Nikola lately for my two blogs and loving it. Simple enough that it’s trivial to hack if you need to, but versatile and featureful enough out of box that I rarely do :)

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                                                                    Thanks, I never notice this Python library. I thought I tried Pelican once… Not my fav.

                                                                    Making something “from top to bottom” that I would use and have complete control of is really fun - I plan to make this SSG work and then make it more extensible (By this time, I think Nikola might help). Well, it’s still a toy for now, but it is already able to generate pages and let me write posts :D

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                                                                  I liked the conversation on this topic and felt like sharing an opinion here. You don’t need async. My only complaint here is the proliferation of async where alternatives that are as high-quality and maintained are difficult to find now

                                                                  “Async in Rust is hard”, FTFY

                                                                  Just don’t use it. I’m not trying to be cheeky. I am a seasoned Rust dev and I avoid async. Async giving better performance is a half-lie. Though Rust community is party to blame here, because it is becoming hard to find non-async libraries. Thankfully, one can usually take an async library and .block_on all the calls. There’s also possibility of using async in parts of the system where it makes sense, and send messages back and forth between sync and async parts. More people are pragmatically reaching the same conclusion.

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                                                                    In Python I’ve had a lot of painful experiences with someone calling a sync function from an async context this blocking the event loop and taking the entire app down (with timeouts in unrelated handlers, making debugging a nightmare). Does Rust have a similar problem?

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                                                                      Blocking in event loop is problematic in Rust too. That said, typically you can spawn a thread (or use spawn_blocking) to run synchronous code within an asynchronous function.

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                                                                        Blocking in event loop is problematic in Rust too.

                                                                        Thanks for sharing. I didn’t know if Rust had features to make it hard to call a sync function from an async context or if it was error prone as with Python.

                                                                        That said, typically you can spawn a thread (or use spawn_blocking) to run synchronous code within an asynchronous function.

                                                                        Sure, I’m more concerned about someone unintentionally invoking a sync API (e.g., someone calls a library function which in turn uses an SDK that makes sync calls).

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                                                                    It’s frankly kind of fascinating that something made by Google would even let you think about the word “union” when using it.

                                                                    Lol.

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                                                                      It’s frankly kind of fascinating that something made by Google would even let you think about the word “union” when using it.

                                                                      Can someone explain the joke for me? :’(

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                                                                          Hah! Thanks for spelling it out.

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                                                                      This seems neat; verbose callbacks have been a bit tedious (surprised this doesn’t get more flak from the people who think Go’s error handling is a major ordeal).

                                                                      Probably the most controversial bit is the lack of types on the parameter values. I’ve had a pretty poor experience with languages that do a lot of type inference because it becomes tedious to know what type a thing is (or returns) without really good tooling, and it seems like it makes it really hard to get good error messages. Requiring “really good tooling” has historically winnowed the field quite a lot–historically we’ve had to choose between editors that have really good support for inference but piss-poor keybindings (or other features). Hopefully language servers will fix (or “have fixed”?) this so we only need to solve for inference in the language server rather than in each editor.

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                                                                        Hopefully language servers will fix (or “have fixed”?)

                                                                        For most popular languages (and some less popular ones) it does seem like it’s fixed. I install a language server through my package manager, open a file in a project, and now I have diagnostics, docs, type-directed autocomplete, all of that stuff, in my keyboard-oriented TUI editor.

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                                                                        Working on an initial version of comments service for my blog. If I’m motivated, I might be able to release it this weekend, but there’s a significant chance that I’ll be playing Battlefield 1 on xbox instead.

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                                                                          I live in Colorado, and we’re expecting to be somewhat snowed in this weekend. So right now I’m planning for a weekend with the fireplace on, lots of tea and baked treats, and an interesting book.

                                                                          Depending on whether I feel like reading something vaguely work-related, current candidates include:

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                                                                            I’ve been recently promoted to staff eng, and I need to start reading some of this staff engineer literature. I don’t quite have imposter syndrome (although maybe I should 🙃), but it would be good to have a clearer idea about what “growth” looks like. Would love to hear your review on the book after you’ve read it.

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                                                                              Here in Thailand the rainy season is in swing so if I’m lucky I can turn off the AC and let the misty breeze chill my place.

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                                                                              I’m gonna go out to the park and write. Probably gonna do a mood piece of a traveler getting lost in a sandstorm and stumbling upon an oasis that has someone to put them back on track to get home.

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                                                                                I really admire how prolific you are. I really don’t know how you have time to try out all of this tech stuff and write about it and apparently write fiction. 👏

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                                                                                  It’s a group effort :)

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                                                                                    I guess it boils down to time management.

                                                                                    my two biggest gains of personal quality time have been:

                                                                                    • ditching TV and radio completely in 2002
                                                                                    • ditching newspapers and all but one magazine in 2007
                                                                                    • some global disease finally making home office possible and permanent in 2020, as well as “losing” a significant amount of “friends” and “buddies” in the process. Number of friends (without air quotes) is down to 5, life much simpler.

                                                                                    The next thing was picking up gardening in 2019 (from my mum, she can not handle it any more). I changed to food-only gardening (I don’t care about flowers) and implemented no-dig methods, which greatly reduce time needed for gardening. So, where others go having a coffee or for a smoke during the day, I go outside with the wire weeder for 15 mins. I do not have back pains any more. And I have fresh veggies in summer and preserved food in Winter. My pastime is now something useful.

                                                                                    Since 2021 I prescribed myself an offline weekend (printed books allowed) every two weeks - I started that because of too much stupid news in the media.

                                                                                    For writing: I did that a lot in 1986, when I was in school, outside was “Chernobyl fallout” here in Bavaria, and we should play inside. I wrote one DIN A4 page squared paper fantasy novel, gave it to my wanna-be-girlfirend (only holding hands - outside there was also HIV) and she would write on where I left off the cliffhanger at the end of the page. vice versa next day.

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                                                                                      The other big part has been slowly getting rid of doomscrolling time in favor of more productive things.

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                                                                                        doomscrolling

                                                                                        thank you, today I learned a new word :)

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                                                                                  Honestly I’m pretty pessimistic about other SBCs. For my similar use case, I mostly want a good amount of memory (8+GB) and low power at idle. I’m seriously considering picking up a used M1 Mac Mini even though they’re many times the retail price of a Pi (the Mac Mini also includes an SSD, a much faster processor, a better GPU, a case, etc), especially since one potential use case would be a media server, and Pis can’t generally manage the transcoding workload very well.

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                                                                                    If you’re going full PC, I’d probably just go for a NUC. Easier to replace parts and more software support.

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                                                                                      I’m working with a cluster of existing raspberry pis, so keeping everything ARM simplifies things somewhat. That said, there’s also a fair amount of value in not needing to virtualize Linux. I’m not particularly worried about replacing parts. That said, the NUCs seem to have pretty competitive idle power draw specs.

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                                                                                        amount of value in not needing to virtualize Linux

                                                                                        Why would you need to do that ?

                                                                                        That said, the NUCs seem to have pretty competitive idle power draw specs.

                                                                                        Well that’s also good to hear.

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                                                                                          Why would you need to do that ?

                                                                                          Because I don’t want to install Linux directly on Apple hardware as I’ve had poor experiences with that in the past, and I’m also running Kubernetes (I want my hypothetical NUC/MacMini to be a node in the cluster) which requires Linux. That said, I think Docker for Mac makes it pretty easy.

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                                                                                            Ah yeah makes sense. My mind was at the NUCs.