1. 2

    One thing the author doesn’t mention is the CSS font-display property. Most browsers will, by default, not render any text while the font is being downloaded. This can be frustrating on a slow connection, since everything except the text will be rendered.

    I use swap on my site, since the typeface isn’t super important for me.

    1. 3

      It’s a hilarious post. It’s hard to recall a closed source vendor that hasn’t screwed over their users in some way. That people have been writing open source seem to be the reason why anything works at all.

      Also I guess people don’t have problems with printers these days because they don’t own printers. Paperless office is a pretty good solution when it comes to CUPS.

      Stuff on the bottom like the USB, Web, POSIX, suckets, ncurses, declare what kind of UX you’re going to have. It’s not the stuff on the surface.

      I feel like Gruber still hasn’t figured it out and still thinks it can be fixed by papering “good UX” proprietary interfaces over stuff.

      1. 6

        I feel like Gruber still hasn’t figured it out and still thinks it can be fixed by papering “good UX” proprietary interfaces over stuff.

        Considering he says exactly the opposite of this, I would disagree with your characterization.

        1. 3

          Stuff on the bottom like the USB, Web, POSIX, suckets, ncurses, declare what kind of UX you’re going to have. It’s not the stuff on the surface.

          Which is exactly why Gruber argues that ESR’s ‘just make a good UI for it’ argument is wrong. UX needs to be considered from the very start of the application’s design, and a lot of Linux desktop software seems to lack cohesion. The number of times that I’ve seen a ‘fooProgram: bar failed’ error message from my DE is disappointing.

        1. 5

          I copy the hosts file from someonewhocares.org to /etc/hosts. On Android, I use NetGuard to block ads throughout the entire system, and ublock origin + noscript (Firefox for Android supports extensions) for blocking ads on websites.

          If I had more machines then I might run a resolver at home, but this is good enough for me.

          1. 1

            Same as me. There’s a great copy of a big anti-ad/anti-malware, etc hosts file on GitHub.

          1. 17

            Maybe I’m an outlier, but I’m incredibly tired of this garbage of trying to transplant exploitative for-profit concepts into Linux distributions?

            I’m using free software because I neither want this, nor need this.

            (That Ubuntu is slowly trying to force people into using Snap is the straw that breaks the camel’s back. I’d rather move to another distribution than deal with this shit.)

            1. 6

              I don’t understand what you mean by “exploitative for-profit concepts”. Could you expand on that?

              1. 7

                If you look at the various “app stores”, they are pretty much full with this dystopian hellhole of apps that want full control over the device and your personal data (either immediately or at some later point in time when you put effort into using it) to sell your information and display ads.

                The app store vendors’ half-hearted attempt of cutting back on this surveillance capitalism with these feel-good permission info screens doesn’t solve the primary issue:

                These are untrustworthy applications built by untrustworthy companies – I wouldn’t want to run them even if I had the world’s best sandbox running on my device.

                Packages in Linux distributions simply don’t have the issue: The expectation is that the developers are trustworthy and have their users’ interests in mind.

                Sandboxing is simply not an useful tool to encourage ethical behavior – it makes things users want either hard or impossible, while not being powerful enough to actually curtail harmful behavior if it existed.

                1. 3

                  Packages in Linux distributions simply don’t have the issue: The expectation is that the developers are trustworthy and have their users’ interests in mind.

                  And even in some cases where developers do send analytics data or put ads in applications (e.g. as Zeal used to do), some distributions patch the upstream code to remove this code.

                  However, I still think there is a place for application bundles. Some distributions just move slowly or people are bound to LTS versions. Desktop applications tend to get stale in such a setup and it’s nice to be able to install applications out-of-band. macOS had a long history of application bundles before code signing, sandboxing, and app stores. However, when an application is not provided by a distribution, you probably want signed bundles (just as distributions GPG-sign package metadata), and possibly sandboxing (though I don’t think sandboxing is good enough yet to allow arbitrary untrusted applications).

                  1. 4

                    I think the approach of projects offering their own repositories with current versions of their software is a pretty good idea.

                    1. 3

                      It is a lot of repeated work for each distribution.

                      1. 1

                        But if projects offer their own repositories, aren’t we back to one of the problems you cited with app stores?

                        These are untrustworthy applications built by untrustworthy companies – I wouldn’t want to run them even if I had the world’s best sandbox running on my device.

                        Packages in Linux distributions simply don’t have the issue: The expectation is that the developers are trustworthy and have their users’ interests in mind.

                        From what I understand, there are a few problems with using distro repos for such software:

                        1. They’re necessarily slower than the developer’s release cadence, and the developer of the upstream software has limited control over providing new versions to package maintainers
                        2. They’re beholden to the library versions provided by other package maintainers. If a dependency of your software isn’t up to date, that means that either the package maintainer, or you, need to adapt to the API of that older version for just that platform.
                        3. Maintainer-provided/applied patches make your software on that platform deviate from upstream or in the worst but rarest case, introduce new bugs specific to that platform.

                        I think providing software bundles for some applications do address these problems (although introduce other problems as well), and are useful in the case of fast-moving desktop applications. I don’t think they obviate package repos at all, nor should distros move towards obviating package repos. They solve different problems.

                    2. 1

                      Is snap/flatpak’s goal really to make running untrusted software less dangerous? I was under the impression that their only aim was to make distribution easier and to mitigate security issues the software itself may have.

                  2. 4

                    I’m using free software because I neither want this, nor need this.

                    This is why we have community-driven distributions. In Debian, for example, maintainers are required to vet packages and also disable any minor privacy invading function.

                    I also add external sandboxing to daemons as part of the packaging. Sadly some upstream developers strongly reject the idea of sandboxing.

                    1. 2

                      Yeah, I’ll probably end up running Debian in the mid-term; considering that synaptic is a hard requirement for me.

                      I probably need to patch the font rendering though, which is pretty annoying that Ubuntu still seems the only distribution that gets that right out of the box.

                      In the long-term I’m looking for an operating system that is a meaningful upgrade to the current repository system (like distri) that has a Rust-only userland (which enables me to actually understand and modify the code I’m running, unlike C/C++).

                      1. 0

                        I also add external sandboxing to daemons as part of the packaging. Sadly some upstream developers strongly reject the idea of sandboxing.

                        I understand this impulse, personally. It has nothing to do with the intent of the packager. It’s all about the odd fallout that the sandbox system in question can lead to. Chasing bugs from a user running your software in some sandbox you’ve never tried would really be aggravating. In part because the packager isn’t who the users complain to. It’s the author.

                      2. 2

                        if you are interested in packing stuff and not control, I think appimage is a better system anyway. Basically just an elf file with a squashfs appended.

                        1. 8

                          I think normal package repositories have been perfectly fine for the last 2 decades and are mostly fine today.

                          For the future, I’m looking forward to something like distri.

                          1. 2

                            If I’m developing software I don’t want to have to generate packages for N different distributions.

                            Distributing my software in some way that doesn’t depend on the OS is appealing (though I prefer the Go approach of just statically compiling).

                            1. 3

                              If I’m developing software I don’t want to have to generate packages for N different distributions.

                              So don’t. That’s the distributions’ problem, not yours.

                              1. 3

                                Distros don’t accept your software unless it’s already popular. Most Linux users prefer to install software from the distribution, so how does it get popular?

                                The simple answers are:

                                • Be part of an existing social connection so that demand can build up even before your software becomes widely-used, or, better yet, become a hard dependency of an already popular package. This is a “good old boy network,” and we should not stand for that.

                                • Package, with distro packages yourself. This requires a bunch of work to support even the popular ones, and leaves the unpopular distros out in the cold.

                                • Package, as a static binary or a hand-rolled installer. This has zero support for the security mitigations that motivated dynamic linking in the first place. This, along with source packages annotated with dependency metadata in a standard format, seems to be the go-to for new languages though.

                                • Distribute source code. The biggest downside of this approach is that there doesn’t exist a standard way to define the dependencies of a source tarball, so installation is a pain.

                                1. 1

                                  That last one depends greatly on your development environment. requirements.txt works reasonably well for python. Go has a standard way to define its dependencies too.

                                  But there is a middle ground answer to your question… while distros don’t accept and distribute your software ‘till it’s popular, you can add PPAs, COPRs, or bsd ports on your own. These let you define dependencies in the ways that make sense for what you are targeting and don’t require official approval.

                                  1. 1

                                    But there is a middle ground answer to your question… while distros don’t accept and distribute your software ‘till it’s popular, you can add PPAs, COPRs, or bsd ports on your own.

                                    I literally listed that as option 2.

                                    1. 1

                                      Sorry. I didn’t read it that way. Obviously a mis-read.

                                  2. 1

                                    Distros don’t accept your software unless it’s already popular.

                                    None of this is generally true. Most distributions will accept any package for inclusion as long as it fits within their project guidelines and–much more importantly–someone has committed to maintaining the package going forward.

                                    This has nothing to do with popularity, it has to do with whether or not any volunteer OS package maintainer feels it’s worth their time to support. If you can’t get an existing maintainer to take an interest in your software, then you might have to step up to be a maintainer yourself. If that sounds like too much work to be worth it, then your software is probably not as valuable as you think it is.

                                  3. 2

                                    But I may also have the competing desire to make my software easy to use and install.

                                    Compiling my code statically solves this problem without me having to faff around with a bunch of different distros.

                                    Now I mostly use Julia and there’s a nice project (Artifacts system, Yggdrasil) where more and more non-julia dependencies are being (mostly) statically compiled and made available as packages that the Julia package manager can deal with. In my opinion, this is a much better way of distributing software than the traditional linux package managers.

                                    Nix and distri are similar to the Julia way of doing things.

                                    Though the Julia system is also cross platform to Windows and BSD in many cases, where of course Nix and distri are not.

                                    1. 3

                                      Compiling statically just replaces one problem with another: now there’s bloat and extra bundled libraries that won’t get security patches when their system copies get patched by the distribution.

                                      Honestly, just be content to relinquish control. Let distributions do whatever they want. And if they don’t want to package your software, maybe your software just isn’t that important, or maybe it’s not important to them to have the latest release packaged every day.

                                      1. 2

                                        If some other schmuck wants to distribute my software some other way, then more power to them, but it’s not unreasonable to want to be able to easily run my software on a bunch of different linuxes without faffing around.

                                        And I’m not convinced by the arguments about bloat and security (and I am not the only one: https://ro-che.info/articles/2016-09-09-static-binaries-scientific-computing)

                                      2. 2

                                        Yggdrasil

                                        You briefly made me think “Holy shit, that’s still aound?!

                                        The Yggdrasil I remember: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yggdrasil_Linux/GNU/X

                                        1. 2

                                          I hope (and kinda expect) that this new Yggdrasil will last a bit longer. The reproducible research effort aims for decades of reproducibility ;)

                                      3. 1

                                        It is when distribution quality issues are then sent to you, or they don’t update in a timely manner…

                                        1. 2

                                          My attitude when this happens with Octave is still the same: sorry, not my problem. Please talk to your distro managers instead.

                                          We have pretty good packagers, though.

                                      4. 2

                                        If I’m developing software I don’t want to have to generate packages for N different distributions.

                                        Isn’t that pretty much a solved issue with OBS and similar services? And if people want to use your software, they will start packaging it either way, so there isn’t that much effort required from our side.

                                        I prefer the Go approach of just statically compiling

                                        My approach is too avoid software written in Go (as well as PHP and Node.js) in general due to software quality/mindset issues. :-)

                                        1. 2

                                          OBS

                                          I’m not familiar with this, but it looks like I would still have to find out the name of all my dependencies on each distro and so on: https://openbuildservice.org/help/manuals/obs-user-guide/cha.obs.package_formats.html

                                          I’m not interested in doing that. But if I don’t do that, my software is typically harder to install on $linux than on windows.

                                          I just want to ship a binary and I don’t want to get any grief about Debian’s ancient libc or whatever. I want to give you an x86 binary and have it run on any linux with a compatible kernel ABI. It’s very annoying wanting to use some decade old software and having to fight to get things to run.

                                          avoid Go

                                          You do you. I also prefer to statically compile C and Rust code.

                                          1. 1

                                            And if people want to use your software, they will start packaging it either way

                                            This seems to be based on the assumption that your users are all programmers.

                                            1. 1

                                              My approach is too avoid software written in Go (as well as PHP and Node.js) in general due to software quality/mindset issues. :-)

                                              You’re missing out on quite a lot of high-quality software due to those mindset issues.

                                              1. 1

                                                Can’t think of any.

                                    1. 2

                                      I appreciate the effort put into this project, but the article seems a little dramatic. Kindle/Kobo/Nook all support DRM-free formats. You may need to use Calibre to convert between formats, but there’s no requirement to use DRMed books. For example, all of the ebooks on Gutenberg are DRM-free.

                                      But I agree that Amazon’s DRM is bad for the reader.

                                      1. 1

                                        As soon as you want to read something recent, you have a need for DRMed books, don’t you, or am I missing something?

                                        1. 2

                                          De-DRM’ing most ebooks is trivial.

                                          1. 1

                                            It depends. Kobo has DRM-free books (but it’s not 100% of their library IIRC). Games Workshop’s books are all DRM-free. I think O’Reilly books are DRM-free (at least, the last book I bought from them was). Many independently-published books are also restriction-free.

                                            That said, amazon probably does have them beat on sheer volume of available books.

                                        1. 1

                                          I think that the hardware is only half the battle, how easy is it to get new books in non-DRM formats?

                                          1. 4

                                            Getting DRM free books can be challenging, but not impossible. Some publishers listed here https://www.libreture.com/bookshops/

                                            It’s also worth noting that it’s possible to strip DRM from books you buy using tools like Calibre.

                                            1. 2

                                              Black Library ebooks are (AFAIK) DRM-free.

                                            1. 1

                                              The footnote all the way at the bottom of the page is funny:

                                              Historical note: At the end of the 20th century when this was written, “cool” was an epithet of approval particularly among young, indicating trendiness, quality, or appropriateness. In the rush to stake our DNS territory involved the choice of domain name and URI path were sometimes directed more toward apparent “coolness” than toward usefulness or longevity. This note is an attempt to redirect the energy behind the quest for coolness.

                                              1. 7

                                                App stores are broken package managers.

                                                1. 3

                                                  Even if we assume that this is true, there still isn’t a package manager in the shared Linux platform. If you want to be a part of the Linux conversation at all, you need to produce at least two: RPM and DEB. And if you want to get more than a mere plurality of Linux installers then you need several more (Pacman, Guix, Nix, Emerge…)

                                                  For someone that wants to distribute a package that works, this really sucks. I don’t like the Play Store’s lack of dependency management, either, but when I produce an APK, I appreciate knowing that I don’t need to produce anything else. The ideal package manager format is the same one everyone else uses.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    For someone that wants to distribute a package that works, this really sucks.

                                                    On the other hand, for someone who just wants to use an existing program and not have it break six months down the line, it’s fantastic.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      I don’t understand what this has to do with having several widespread packaging formats. Having software that does “not break six months down the line” requires only that:

                                                      • The package be OSS, or, at least, the distributor posess a copy of the source code and the legal right to do necessary integration patching.

                                                      • The package be buildable without an internet connection, using only files that the distro has.

                                                      • Any online services the package relies upon be available six months down the line, either because it’s not a networked application anyway, the organization behind its runtime dependencies is stable (the NTP Pool, the DNS Root, the various TLS CAs, detectportal.firefox.com), or because it relies on no mothership (BitTorrent, mDNS).

                                                      I love the idea of distro-curated, 100%-OSS, repositories. In fact, I’d go farther and say that I like the way they’re implemented better than the app stores run by Google, Apple, and Microsoft. The fact that they are incompatible with each other, however, just seems like unnecessary friction.

                                                  2. 1

                                                    What do you mean?

                                                  1. 2

                                                    I’m surprised that JSON feeds are requested more than Atom. Is it mostly web crawlers grabbing your JSON feed?

                                                    1. 3

                                                      I just checked, and appears to be a single agent from a single IP address responsible for 91% of all the requests (3,723 out of 4,093), and it fetches the feed every 10 minutes. And the only thing it says in the user agent is “Ruby”. Go figure.

                                                    1. 13

                                                      One thing is a discussion whether “self-hosting on a VPS is good enough” and then there’s trying to redefine a term that’s been nearly unequivocally used for quite a while - and I don’t think this is a useful discussion. No matter how purist, this ship has sailed, please don’t fight windmlls.

                                                      That said, I also disagree with the original hot take.

                                                      If you don’t trust the hoster’s admins to not somehow remote into your xen instance… surprise, they can open your cabinet and plug an USB drive in. If you rent a physical server it may have a serial attached.

                                                      Where do you draw the line? I don’t claim to be right, but I do think I am not a lot more secure by renting a server at the same hoster versus renting a VPS there.

                                                      So unless you glue all your ports shut and deliver your case with case intrusion on or maybe run your own cabinet (and even then someone might break in).. then I might concede the point.

                                                      Also sure, my self-hosted services at home are better secured from physical access. but also a lot less reliably hosted. No USV, no multihoming, no DC-grade networking equipment. Also 24h disconnects are kinda the norm here, so there’s always 1-5min downtime every day. Everything else besides physical access control is worse. So I’d gladly trade that for the VPS and call it self-hosting.

                                                      1. 5

                                                        With the disclaimer that I’m not personally particularly worried about having a VPS subverted, the threat model is a little different from a physical box. With a physical box, the colo facility can get into it.

                                                        With a VPS, the colo facility can get into it, the hypervisor admins can get into it (often these are the same people as the colo facility, but not always), anyone who finds a privilege escalation bug in the hypervisor can get into it and anyone who breaks into the hypervisor admins’ system for administering the boxes can get into it. Historically, hypervisors have had privilege escalation bugs found in them - didn’t Xen have a lot of bugs related to random stuff like the emulated floppy drivers? And IIRC there was at least one high-profile incident in the news where Linode got broken into by people who used that access to break into VPSes belonging to Linode’s customers.

                                                        edit: to be clear, I don’t consider “subverted by the company I’m paying to host the box” to be something worth worrying about (because they’ll promptly lose all customers and go bankrupt if they do that). I don’t really care about splitting the “does this really count as self-hosted?” hairs. I’m just pointing out that, if you’re paranoid, you may care about the fact that a VPS typically has a couple more layers of stuff which could have security holes in them that give away access to your box by accident.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          You’re absolutely right, I had forgotten about “people on the same physical host who could find their way in through the hypervisor” - but as I said, my main point is that “self-hosting” isn’t 100% about security.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            Physical server providers often use integrated management systems like Dell’s ILO. Those can and do have privilege escalation bugs in them too. :-3

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Now those things genuinely terrify me. It seems most likely that the firmware on all of them is written the same kind of abject negligence normally found in IoT gadget manufacturers or home router vendors.

                                                          2. 2

                                                            Also, there’s always the practical security aspect of opening up your home network to the rest of the world. I’m not too concerned if my VPS gets owned, but I’d be a lot more worried if my home server got owned

                                                          1. 1

                                                            There’s also https://webring.xxiivv.com/#random, though it seems to be targeted towards creative sites.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              speaking of ‘targeted towards creative sites’ - there’s also the classic http://jodi.org

                                                            1. 2

                                                              Pi-hole to the rescue. Outmanoeuvre that Google!

                                                              Also, part of me believe that things like this will actually, eventually, contribute to ending the reign of Google Chrome.

                                                              1. 10

                                                                Outmanoeuvre that Google!

                                                                I believe youtube is able to sidestep host-based solutions because they serve ads from their own domain. also there’s crazy hacks like sending ads over a websocket connection, which ublock somehow is able to defeat

                                                                1. 4

                                                                  Resolverless DNS will evade this as the DNS records for 3rd party page assets will be shipped in the HTTP headers.

                                                                  Starting to wonder how long before this happens… and when the outrage from security folks will make news. I guess since they didn’t care about the consequences of DoH they won’t care about this either.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    DoH, which I admit does have actual privacy benefits, also happens to help work around the ad-blocker problem for Google.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    The new big trend in tech, dark mode

                                                                    How is this new? Haven’t dark themes been a thing for over 20-30 years?

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      It doesn’t have to be a new thing to be a new trend. Fashion is famously cyclic too.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        That’s plausible. I don’t see it as a trend, rather something that the tech overlords have permitted their users to enable, but if you re-interpret this as a kind of “fashion”-thing, it kind of makes sense?

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          FWIW I think tech is so trend driven it hurts.

                                                                      2. 2

                                                                        Slack and iOS offering it apparently make it “new”

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Yeah but you used to have to mess around with widget styles or custom CSS overrides. IOS and android now have a switch that changes styling for all system apps.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            I was just saying that the concept doesn’t seem new. Especially on platforms with themes.

                                                                        1. 1
                                                                          1. portable USB hard disk at home
                                                                          2. portable USB hard disk at my workplace, updated monthly-ish
                                                                          3. backups to B2

                                                                          the most important thing I back up is my personal photos, so zipping up each album and throwing them onto a drive is good enough for me.

                                                                          1. 19

                                                                            This seems to break my browser’s back button.

                                                                            1. 6
                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                Yeah, not quite functional.

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  Yeah this is pretty poor experience, combined with the lack of scroll control (i.e. you can’t scroll to navigate) it’s pretty much unusable IMO.

                                                                                1. 7

                                                                                  Self-promotion for fundraising, flagged. Cool project though!

                                                                                  1. 4

                                                                                    Why is this any different then people self promoting their blog articles (which they do all the time here). In 99% of cases It ultimateivelly is about end effect, which is money.

                                                                                    1. 4

                                                                                      I highly dispute the 99% numbers. How do you even get this idea? There are so many blogs that don’t have ads, are not trying to promote their authors, etc.pp.

                                                                                      1. 0

                                                                                        Self promotion, not ads - its about better prospects on future jobs by building and influencing community around the stuff you do.

                                                                                        So 99% is from head, but I am sure its even higher. Or you tell me you know bunch of people, who write great technical blogs just for the sake of researching particular topic, are stuffed for life (rich family) or despise materialism and live in a barrel like 1 dude ever, and do it anonymously because they dont need any attention …

                                                                                        1. 12

                                                                                          Or you tell me you know bunch of people, who write great technical blogs just for the sake of researching particular topic, are stuffed for life (rich family) or despise materialism and live in a barrel like 1 dude ever, and do it anonymously because they dont need any attention …

                                                                                          This seems to be an overly cynical perspective. I write blog posts because I want to share my knowledge or some other information with the world, and I’m sure I’m not alone.

                                                                                    2. 3

                                                                                      Thanks!

                                                                                      1. 4

                                                                                        Something on the tagging: note that tags on lobsters are block-if-any.

                                                                                        So, if you have a diehard emacs user that is filtering vim, they won’t see this, nor will a vim user filtering emacs, or anybody filtering web (which is usually kind of a broad tag). So, a smaller supporting set of tags is usually going to help you.

                                                                                        1. 5

                                                                                          That actually defeats the purpose of tags and looks more like categories.

                                                                                          The said problem is internal software thing.

                                                                                          In any case, about that dude filtering out emacs - I could totally live with that :)

                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                            Thanks, didn’t know that!

                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                        In retrospect it’s kind of amazing how quickly we moved from an Internet with no “like” counts (the golden age of blogging) to an Internet where it’s very difficult to find any community where “like” counts or upvotes are not a core part of the system. Even indie sites like Lobste.rs or Metafilter that eschew a lot of the apparatus of the modern Internet incorporate this very quantitative approach to community and social interaction.

                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                          Yes. The quieter, less-evaluative Internet was hijacked by one of addictive narcissism.

                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                            After writing my earlier comment I realized that there is one type of online community I participate in that is completely free of likes/voting/ranking/quantitative anything: mailing lists.

                                                                                            It’s probably not a coincidence that I love mailing lists, while people whose Internet experience started even a few years later than mine did seem to really, really hate them. I wonder if there is a real generational (or internet-generational) divide here, or if I’m just an outlier.

                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                              It’s probably not a coincidence that I love mailing lists, while people whose Internet experience started even a few years later than mine did seem to really, really hate them. I wonder if there is a real generational (or internet- generational) divide here, or if I’m just an outlier.

                                                                                              As a guy who first acquired an ISP in 1993, I can honestly say that I generally dislike mailing lists (like most people, I guess). I always think of them as a poor-man’s usenet, I would much rather just hop on tin(1) and read the latest posts in my subscribed groups.

                                                                                              Having said that, I am a member of some mailing lists that I genuinely enjoy. Though they are the exception, not the rule…

                                                                                            2. 1

                                                                                              It would be interesting to see an implementation of an upvote button that didn’t display the count to the users. You still get the “community” aspect of it, without the narcissistic side.

                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                HN does this.

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  Right! For the comments. They still show the points for each story, which I think makes sense (or does it…?)

                                                                                              2. 1

                                                                                                Back then we had guestbooks and hit counters to provide the tingle of popularity that is oh so addictive.

                                                                                                I remember when I first added commenting to my blog and getting ten or so meaningfull comments within the first week of publishing a new post was a thrill to see; those were different to likes though, because they were actual meaningful interactions that often spawned discussion.

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                I think that’s a reasonable rational and I wonder if DoH is going to end up being OS supported at some point.

                                                                                                1. 4

                                                                                                  Absolutely not! Why the hell would you want to centralise something that was decentralised since before Al Gore invented the internet?

                                                                                                  1. 5

                                                                                                    What? How would providing a DoH at an OS level centralize anything more than providing dns over tcp?

                                                                                                    Edit: It occurs to me that perhaps you thought I meant dns over https (DoH) as is implemented by firefox, ie with cloudflare being the defacto resolver. What I meant was that I wonder if DoH might come to be provided as a an alternative to or super set of normal OS DNS support with some sort of resolver discovery.

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                                                                                                      Maybe cnst is talking about CAs.

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                                                                                                        DoH/DoT don’t inherently require CAs. The OS could offer an interface like “set IP address and expected certificate in resolv.conf”, for example. (but, IMO, concerns about CAs are silly. Everything in userspace WILL use CAs, why would an OS take a hard stance against CAs?)

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                                                                                                    I’m still not convinced that we need DoH in the OS. What does DoH gives us that DoT doesn’t?

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                                                                                                      What does DoH gives us that DoT doesn’t?

                                                                                                      Transport encryption.

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                                                                                                        What does the T in dot stand for?

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                                                                                                          TCP

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                                                                                                            No, it’s TLS.

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                                                                                                              Is it? My bad.

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                                                                                                                  Conventional DNS is a UDP protocol ;)

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                                                                                                                    Primarily UDP, but TCP if the response it too large and EDNS is not supported; also for zone transfers.

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                                                                                                      The important thing is to show the player the AI. There’s no point having sophisticated AI that the player doesn’t notice.

                                                                                                      This is so true. And there’s also an opposite effect: players may interpret random events and coincidences as AI being clever or mean.

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                                                                                                        This even applies to tabletop games! Players have a habit of seeing patterns and intricate plots despite the fact that the DM just picked a random NPC or character trait from a table.

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                                                                                                          The thesis of this is something like dwarf fortress, where the “psychology” is somewhat visible to you. It has a rich system and you can see it.

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                                                                                                          How can this be spam when I’m not the author of this story?

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                                                                                                            It reads like a marketing brag piece, and the product is apparently in “private alpha” so nobody here can test its claims.

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                                                                                                              Spam is the closest thing to “this is a bad article”.

                                                                                                              Alternatives:

                                                                                                              • Off-topic -> clearly about IT/Technology/Sciences
                                                                                                              • Already Posted -> not already posted (the link would appear at the bottom)
                                                                                                              • Broken Link -> link works just fine

                                                                                                              So, we are left with “Spam”: a catch all, which includes “Rubbish” but also “Marketing”, “Low Effort”, “Just Absolute Bollocks” and more.

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                                                                                                                Spam is the closest thing to “this is a bad article”.

                                                                                                                IMO off-topic is better used for this, e.g. when someone posts something that would fit in better on HN, even if it’s tech-related, it can be off topic for this site.

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                                                                                                                  Now this is interesting. You felt the need to “downvote” this story because you don’t like it, and you chose the only flag which could possibly be interpreted as “bad content”, under the assumption that on-topic “bad content” is something that you should be able to flag. I feel like you’re abusing the flag in doing so, but I also imagine that this form of abuse is quite common. In any case, it’s quite “low effort” on your part.

                                                                                                                  I suggest we would all be better served if you would instead articulate what you dislike about the story.

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                                                                                                                    Oi dude, don’t assume things out in the wild and then feel like you should be the one preaching the solution.

                                                                                                                    I just replied to OP’s comment, nothing else.

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                                                                                                                  I’m used to languages and development/orchestration tools being open source or at least something you can download an play with. Since I can’t do that, then or all practical purposes, as far as I’m concerned this Dark thing does not actually exist. And since it doesn’t exist, then reading about all of its impressive (and likely inflated) claims was a huge waste of my time.

                                                                                                                  (I didn’t flag, downvote, or upvote the story, however.)

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                                                                                                                    Commenting on a story acts like upvoting it, so you should probably flag it (that’s what I’m doing right now to cancel out my comment).