1.  

    SMS + Facebook for IRL friends, Telegram for internet friends

    1. 1

      I think monetization will be important. Many YouTube uploaders live off YouTube monetization schemes. Without monetization they won’t move.

      1. 3

        Feature not bug.

        1. 1

          I think some sort of integration/easy onboarding with platforms like liberapay would be an incredibly useful feature for uploaders.

        2. 1

          It’s doable! There’s people working to make subscriptions a thing. Right now you can directly back people using Patreon.

          1. 2

            Or Liberapay.

        1. 18

          Photography, D&D, and learning Dutch. Fingers crossed, I’ll finally be able to get into running this year.

          I recommend trying to find a hobby that keeps you out of a chair, for the sake of your back and body in general though.

          1. 13

            learning Dutch

            Laat maar weten als je hulp nodig hebt :)

            1. 4

              Thanks for the recommendation!

            1. 8

              As much as I’d love to see people actually pay for tools, I don’t quite get why they’re trying this with the JDK.

              1. 25

                Because people will fall into the trap, and they will get a call from Oracle’s compliance department, and Oracle will make money, and that will buy enough fuel to power the Larry Ellison for another day or so.

                1. 10

                  Wanted to mention the following comment on the same note:

                  https://palisadecompliance.com/oracle-org-chart/

                  Granted the article is opionated and a bit dated (2013) but this shows what Oracle is capable of.

                  1. 5

                    I don’t know if it’s deliberate or by accident, but I like the idea of fueling a Larry Ellison.

                    But it will be a drag to ensure proper compliance with these new rules…

                    1. 30

                      “…You need to think of Larry Ellison the way you think of a lawnmower. You don’t anthropomorphize your lawnmower, the lawnmower just mows the lawn, you stick your hand in there and it’ll chop it off, the end. You don’t think ‘oh, the lawnmower hates me’ – lawnmower doesn’t give a shit about you, lawnmower can’t hate you. Don’t anthropomorphize the lawnmower. Don’t fall into that trap about Oracle.” – Bryan Cantrill

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-zRN7XLCRhc

                1. 5

                  Even easier. You follow these steps:

                  1. Make one that learns to adapt language to that of high scoring players that speak the most (more training data).

                  2. Put it on Xbox Live playing Modern Warfare.

                  3. Wait for a few months.

                  After a few months, it will be both racist and dissing everyone’s mom. Just had to play the imitation game on the noisiest players.

                  Whereas, countering it would be a bit more difficult. You’d have to pre-train it with an adaption ability. You’d want a delay before the new inputs really count or a roll-back to previous state that’s good. Then, a detection mechanism for trolling or hate speech to tell you when to mute players, Then, maybe one to look back at when they first started talking. Then, delete or roll back to before that point. Might need this for in-game play, too, in case a group tried to do collectively stupid things to a bot to make it learn stupidity for future games.

                  1. 11

                    This is basically what happened with Microsoft’s Tay.AI, except with Twitter instead of XBL.

                    1. 2

                      Called it!

                  1. 1

                    First Newegg, now NCIX…I guess I won’t be building that PC I wanted anytime soon.·

                    1. 2

                      I’m at work, so I was just able to glance quickly, but it doesn’t look like anything at the other end of this link confirms his death. Is this speculative at this point?

                      1. 7

                        Last I heard, someone on /g/ posted a screenshot of a Facebook page for Terry that had been set to memorial mode. The link to the page spread and people reported that Terry had died. Then, someone claiming to be OP replied to that thread and said that they had created the page themselves and were trying to fool their friends.

                        So yeah, sources are dubious

                        1. 6

                          Right at the end of the page: “Terry A. Davis (1969 - 2018). Rest in peace!”

                          1. 2

                            Thanks for this! I may have missed this originally, but I’m 90% sure that was added in-between when I posted and your comment.

                        1. 1

                          This issue was tagged with ‘Implementation needed’ on August 29, 2017. Have there been any developments since then?

                          1. 1

                            Unfortunately the case for IRCv3, not likely.

                          1. 2

                            I like gopher, but the manually-wrapped text aspect of it turned me off. If the client could decide to wrap paragraphs on its own (like HTML) then it’d be perfect.

                            1. 1

                              the client can do that; it’s the default behavior on mosaic. although in general you should wrap your lines to accommodate people whose clients aren’t configured that way.

                            1. 3

                              Another James Mickens talk! I can’t wait to watch this!

                              1. 2

                                Does anyone here use Bitwarden? I didn’t know about it, but it looks really attractive.

                                1. 3

                                  Yes, it’s awesome. It’s also the only password manager that has a Firefox for Android extension (to my knowledge).

                                  1. 3

                                    Yes. It has some rough edges – I wish syncing was better – but it’s working great.

                                    My syncing issue has to do with the fact that everything has its own copy the data: desktop app, mobile app, browser plugins, etc. When you make a change they do not sync between them all immediately. You can have a Bitwarden app or plugin that is days behind so you have to go to settings and do a manual sync. Very annoying, but not a deal breaker.

                                    1. 2

                                      I use the venerable pass. It has none of this mobile mumbojumbo or autosync frills the kids today are talking about.

                                      It’s so simple and lean, I never thought pass git pull would be annoying.

                                      I would appreciate a mobile UI sometimes, though. A Sailfish client. But that’s not a dealbreaker either.

                                      Maybe I could hook the missus up with Rubywarden, though. Pass would be too much for her.

                                      Addendum: There appears to be a QML frontend on OpenRepos. Found through storeman. Not a complete client but have to give it a spin :)

                                      1. 1

                                        There is definitely a pass app for android. I’m not sure about iOS.

                                        1. 1

                                          As someone who uses a mobile and two desktops, having passwords being synced across devices is a must-have. It’s just too much of a pain to remember to copy new passwords from my phone to machine A, then B, and vice-versa.

                                          1. 1

                                            Home desktop, work desktop, work laptop, work macOS laptop and hopefully soon two Sailfish mobiles running pass.

                                            Made git pull a habit, not a chore, but ymmv.

                                      2. 2

                                        yeah, it’s open source and possible to run self-hosted as well.

                                        check out the discussion from a topic from a few days ago, id just be copying from there:

                                      1. 9

                                        FWIW I really like Overcast, an independent mobile podcatcher (iOS/web) https://overcast.fm

                                        Anyone else have a podcatcher they recommend?

                                        1. 5

                                          I use antennapod. I’m a heavy podcast listener, 3h of traffic everyday, 100 hours a month.
                                          The application doesn’t limit itself to itune you can also search on https://www.gpodder.net/ and others, or still add your own RSS feeds. It’s open source, so no ads and only good features that the people use.

                                          1. 2

                                            +1 for Antennapod. It has its bugs, but the UI is simple but still functional enough for me.

                                          2. 1

                                            I really like PocketCasts.

                                            1. 1

                                              I’ve used them all and for IOS Overcast is the clear winner IMO. I wish they’d polish their web player a bit but other than that it’s totally fab.

                                            1. 12

                                              A realization I recently had:

                                              Why don’t we abstract away all display affordances from a piece of code’s position in a file? That is, the editor reads the file, parses its AST, and displays it according to the programmer’s preference (e.g., elastic tabstops, elm-like comma-leading lists, newline/no-newline before opening braces, etc). And prior to save, the editor simply runs it through an uncustomized prettier first.

                                              There are a million and one ways to view XML data without actually reading/writing pure XML. Why not do that with code as well?

                                              1. 4

                                                This idea is floating around the interwebz for a long time. I recall it being stated almost verbatim on Reddit, HN, probably on /.

                                                1. 6

                                                  And once you take it a step further, it’s clear that it shouldn’t be in a text file in the first place. Code just isn’t text. If you store it as a tree or a graph in some sort of database, it becomes possible to interact with it in much more powerful ways (including displaying it any way you like). We’ve been hobbled by equating display representation with storage format.

                                                  1. 7

                                                    This talk touches on this issue, along with some related ones and HCI in general: Bret Victor: The Future of Programming

                                                    1. 2

                                                      God, I have been trying to recall the name of this talk for ages! Thank you so much, it is a great recommendation

                                                    2. 5

                                                      Text is great when (not if) your more complicated tools fail or do something you can’t tolerate and you need to use tools which don’t Respect The Intent of designers who, for whatever reason, don’t respect your intent or workflow. Sometimes, solving a problem means working around a breakage, whether or not that breakage is intentional on someone else’s part.

                                                      Besides, we just (like, last fifteen or so years) got text to the point where it’s largely compatible. Would be a shame to throw that away in favor of some new AST-database-thing which only exists on a few platforms.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        I’m not sure I get your point about about intent. Isn’t the same already true of, say, compilers? There are compiler bugs that we have to work around, there are programs that seem logical to us but the compiler won’t accept, and so on. Still, everybody seems to be mostly happy to file a compiler bug or a feature request, and live with a workaround for the present. Seems like it works well enough in practice.

                                                        I understand your concern about introducing a new format but it sounds like a case of worse-is-better. Sure, we get a lot of convenience from the ubiquity of text, but it would nevertheless be sad if we were stuck with it for the next two centuries.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          With compilers, there are multiple of them for any given language, if the language is important enough, and you can feed the same source into all of them, assuming that source is text.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            I’ve never seen anyone casually swap out the compiler for production code. Also, for the longest time, if you wrote C++ for Windows, you pretty much had to use the Microsoft compiler. I’m sure that there are many embedded platforms with a single compiler.

                                                            If there’s a bug in the compiler, in most casss you work around it, then patiently wait for a fix from the vendor.

                                                            So that’s hardly a valid counterpoint.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Re: swapping out compiler for production code: most if not all cross-platform C++ libraries can be compiled on at least llvm, gcc and msvc.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                Yes, I’m aware of that, but what does it have to do with anything I said?

                                                                EDIT: Hey, I went to Canterbury :)

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  “I’ve never seen anyone casually swap out the compiler for production code” sounded like you were saying people didn’t tend to compile the same production code on multiple compilers, which of course anyone that compiles on windows and non-windows does. Sorry if I misinterpreted your comment!

                                                                  My first comment is in response to another Kiwi. Small world. Pretty cool.

                                                      2. 1

                                                        This, this, a thousand times this. Text is a good user-interface for code (for now). But it’s a terrible storage and interchange format. Every tool needs its own parser, and each one is slightly different, leaving begging the amount of cpu and programmer time we waste going from text<->ast<->text.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          Yeah, it’s obviously wasteful and limiting. Why do you think we are still stuck with text? Is it just sheer inertia and incrementalism, or does text really offer advantages that are challenging to recreate with other formats?

                                                          1. 7

                                                            The text editor I use can handle any computer language you can throw at it. It doesn’t matter if it’s BASIC, C, BCPL, C++, SQL, Prolog, Fortran 77, Pascal, x86 Assembler, Forth, Lisp, JavaScript, Java, Lua, Make, Hope, Go, Swift, Objective-C, Rexx, Ruby, XSLT, HTML, Perl, TCL, Clojure, 6502 Assembler, 68000 Assembler, COBOL, Coffee, Erlang, Haskell, Ocaml, ML, 6809 Assembler, PostScript, Scala, Brainfuck, or even Whitespace. [1]

                                                            Meanwhile, the last time I tried an IDE (last year I think) it crashed hard on a simple C program I attempted to load into it. It was valid C code [2]. That just reinforced my notion that we aren’t anywhere close to getting away from text.

                                                            [1] APL is an issue, but only because I can’t type the character set on my keyboard.

                                                            [2] But NOT C++, which of course, everybody uses, right?

                                                            1. 0

                                                              To your point about text editors working with any language, I think this is like arguing that the only tool required by a carpenter is a single large screwdriver: you can use it as a hammer, as a chisel, as a knife (if sharpened), as a wedge, as a nail puller, and so on. Just apply sufficient effort and ingenuity! Does that sound like an optimal solution?

                                                              My preference is for powerful specialised tools rather than a single thing that can be kind of sort of applied to a task.

                                                              Or, to approach from the opposite direction, would you say that a CAD application or Blender are bad tools because they only work with a limited number of formats? If only they also allowed you to edit JPEGs and PDFs, they would be so much better!

                                                              To your point about IDEs: I think that might even support my argument. Parsing of freeform text is apparently sufficiently hard that we’re still getting issues like the one you saw.

                                                              1. 9

                                                                I use other tools besides the text editor—I use version control, compilers, linkers, debuggers, and a whole litany of Unix tools (grep, sed, awk, sort, etc). The thing I want to point out is that as long as the source code is in ASCII (or UTF-8), I can edit it. I can study it. I might not be able to compile it (because I lack the INRAC compiler but I can still view the code). How does one “view” Smalltalk code when one doesn’t have Smalltalk? Or Visual Basic? Last I hear, Microsoft wasn’t giving out the format for Visual Basic programs (and good luck even finding the format for VB from the late 90s).

                                                                The other issue I have with IDEs (and I will come out and say I have a bias against the things because I’ve never had one that worked for me for any length of time without crashing, and I’ve tried quite a few over 30 years) is that you have one IDE for C++, and one for Java, and one for Pascal, and one for Assembly [1] and one for Lua and one for Python and man … that’s just too many damn environments to deal with [2]. Maybe there are IDEs now that can work with more than one language [3] but again, I’ve yet to find one that works.

                                                                I have nothing against specialized tools like AutoCAD or Blender or PhotoShop or even Deluxe Paint, as long as there is a way to extract the data when the tool (or the company) is no longer around. Photo Shop and Deluxe Paint work with defined formats that other tools can understand. I think Blender works with several formats, but I am not sure about AutoCAD (never having used it).

                                                                So, why hasn’t anyone stored and manipulated ASTs? I keep hearing cries that we should do it, but yet, no one has yet done it … I wonder if it’s harder than you even imagine …

                                                                Edited to add: Also, I’m a language maven, not a tool maven. It sounds like you are a tool maven. That colors our perspectives.

                                                                [1] Yes, I’ve come across several of those. Never understood the appeal …

                                                                [2] For work, I have to deal with C, C++, Lua, Make and Perl.

                                                                [3] Yeah, the last one that claimed C/C++ worked out so well for me.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  For your first concern about the long term accessibility of the code, you’ve already pointed out the solution: a defined open format.

                                                                  Regarding IDEs: I’m not actually talking about IDEs; I’m talking about an editor that works with something other than text. Debugging, running the code, profiling etc. are different concerns and they can be handled separately (although again, the input would be something other than text). I suppose it would have some aspects of an IDE because you’d be manipulating the whole code base rather than individual files.

                                                                  Regarding the language maven post: I enjoyed reading it a few years ago (and in practice, I’ve always ended up in the language camp as an early adopter). It was written 14 years ago, and I think the situation is different now. People have come to expect tooling, and it’s much easier to provide it in the form of editor/IDE plugins. Since language creators already have to do a huge amount of work to make programs in their languages executable in some form, I don’t think it would be an obstacle if the price of admission also included dealing with the storage format and representation.

                                                                  To your point about lack of implementations: don’t Smalltalk and derivatives such as Pharo qualify? I don’t know if they store ASTs but at least they don’t store text. I think they demonstrate that it’s at least technically possible to get away from text, so the lack of mainstream adoption might be caused by non-technical reasons like being in a local maximum in terms of tools.

                                                                  The problem, as always, is that there is such a huge number of tools already built around text that it’s very difficult to move to something else, even if the post-transition state of affairs would be much better.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Text editors are language agnostic.

                                                                    I’m trying to conceive of an “editor” that works with something other than text. Say an AST. Okay, but in Pascal, you have to declare variables at the top of each scope; you can declare variables anywhere in C++. In Lua, you can just use a variable, no declaration required. LISP, Lua and JavaScript allow anonymous functions; only the latest versions of C++ and Java allow anonymous functions, but they they’re restricted in that you can’t create closures, since C++ and Java have no concept of closures. C++ has exceptions, Java has two types of exceptions, C doesn’t; Lua kind of has exceptions but not really. An “AST editor” would have to somehow know that is and isn’t allowed per language, so if I’m editing C++ and write an anonymous function, I don’t reference variables outside the scope of said function, but that it can for Lua.

                                                                    Okay, so we step away from AST—what other format do you see as being better than text?

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      I don’t think it could be language agnostic - it would defeat the purpose as it wouldn’t be any more powerful than existing editors. However, I think it could offer largely the same UI, for similar languages at least.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        And that is my problem with it. As stated, I use C, C++ [1], Lua, Make and a bit of Perl. That’s at least what? Three different “editors” (C/C++, Lua/Perl (maybe), Make). No thank you, I’ll stick with a tool that can work with any language.

                                                                        [1] Sparingly and where we have no choice; no one on my team actually enjoys it.

                                                                      2. 1

                                                                        Personally, I’m not saying you should need to give up your editor of choice. Text is a good (enough for now) UI for coding. But it’s a terrible format to build tools on. If the current state of the code lived in some sort of event-based graph database for example, your changes could trigger not only your incremental compiler, but source analysis (only on what’s new), it could also maintain a semantic changelog for version control, trigger code-generation (again, only what’s new).

                                                                        There’s a million things that are currently “too hard” which would cease to be too hard if we had a live model of the code as various graphs (not just the ast, but call graphs, inheritance graphs, you-name-it) that we could subscribe to, or even write purely-functional consumers that are triggered only on changes.

                                                              2. 4

                                                                Inertia, arrogance, worse-is-better; Working systems being trapped behind closed doors at big companies; Hackers taking their language / editor / process on as part of their identity that needs to be defended with religious zeal; The complete destruction of dev tools as a viable business model; Methodologies-of-the-week…. The causes are numerous and varied, and the result is software dev is being hamstrung and we’re all wasting countless hours and dollars doing things computers should be doing for us.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  I think that part of the issue is that we haven’t seen good structured editor support outside of Haskell and some Lisps.

                                                                  Having a principled foundation for structured editor + a critical mass by having it work for a language like Javascript/Ruby, would go a long way to making this concept more mainstream. After which we could say “provide a grammar for favorite language X and get structured editor support!”. This then becomes “everything is structured at all levels!”

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    I think it’s possible that this only works for a subset of languages.

                                                                    Structured editing is good in that it operates at a higher level than characters, but ultimately it’s still a text editing tool, isn’t it? For example, I think it should be trivial to pull up a list of (editable) definitions for all the functions in a project that call a given function, or to sort function and type definitions in different ways, or to substitute function calls in a function with the bodies of those functions to a given depth (as opposed to switching between different views to see what those functions do). I don’t think structured editing can help with tasks like that.

                                                                    There are also ideas like Luna, have you seen it? I’m not convinced by the visual representation (it’s useful in some situations but I’m not sure it’s generally effective), but the interesting thing is they provide both a textual and a visual representation of the code.

                                                                2. 1

                                                                  Python has a standard library module for parsing Python code into an AST and modifying the AST, but I don’t know of any Python tools that actually use it. I’m sure some of them do, though.

                                                                3. 1

                                                                  Smalltalk. The word you’re looking for is Smalltalk. ;)

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    Lisp, in fact. Smalltalk lives in an image, Lisp lives in the real world. ;)

                                                                    Besides, Lisp already is the AST. Smalltalk has too much sugar, which is a pain in the AST.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Possibly, but I’m only talking about a single aspect of it: being able to analyse and manipulate the code in more powerful ways than afforded by plain text. I think that’s equally possible for FP languages.

                                                                  2. 1

                                                                    Ultimately I think this is the only teneble solution. I feel I must be in the minority in having an extreme dislike of columnar-style code, and what I call “white space cliffs” where a column dictates a sudden huge increase in whitespace. But I realize how much it comes down to personal aesthetics, so I wish we could all just coexist :)

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Yeah, I’ve been messing around with similar ideas, see https://nick.zoic.org/art/waste-web-abstract-syntax-tree-editor/ although it’s only vapourware so far because things got busy …

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        Many editors already do this to some extent. They just render 4-space tabs as whatever the user asks for. Everything after the indent, though, is assumed to be spaced appropriately (which seems right, anyway?)

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          You can’t convert to elastic-tabstop style from that, and without heavy language-grammar knowledge you can’t do this for 4-space “tabs” generally.

                                                                          Every editor ever supports this for traditional indent style, though: http://intellindent.info/seriously/

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            To be clear, you can absolutely render a file that doesn’t have elastic tabstops as if it did. The way a file is rendered has nothing to do with the actual text in the file.

                                                                            It’s like you’re suggesting that you can’t render a file containing a ton of numbers as a 3D scene in a game engine. That would be just wrong.

                                                                            Regardless, my point is specifically that this elastic tabstops thing is not necessary and hurts code readability more than it helps.

                                                                            The pefantics of clarifying between tabs and tabstops is a silly thing as well. Context gives more than enough information to know which one is being talked about.

                                                                            It sounds like this concept is creating more problems than it solves, and is causing your editor to solve problems that only exist in the seveloper’s imagination. It’s not “KISS” at all, quite the opposite.

                                                                        2. 1

                                                                          Because presentation isn’t just a function of the AST. Indentation usually is, but alignment can be visually useful for all kinds of reasons.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          OT: is it just me or is the back button on this site broken?

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            It’s one of the new fangled blogspot themes, so lots of stuff is more or less broken.

                                                                          1. 4

                                                                            Does anyone have any experience with Microsoft Teams? We are looking at it as a potential replacement.

                                                                            1. 6

                                                                              My team (roughly ~40 people) transitioned from Slack to Teams a bit over a year ago. It’s gone well and speaking in terms of productivity, it’s been an improvement. There are a lot of cool integration features with Teams but they’re more oriented to the Microsoft ecosystem whereas Slack was more open. We do everything w/ Microsoft here (Azure, VSTS, .NET, Office 365, etc)so it worked out well.

                                                                              Slack has more ‘fun’ features like custom emojis - we had to give up all the funny faces of team members in the transition.

                                                                              If your company isn’t in the Micorosft ecosystem I don’t think I would recommend it.

                                                                              1. 4

                                                                                It’s reliable and has plenty of good features, especially on the management side, but the UX is not excellent. Some people even claim to hate it, but I haven’t figured out how serious those feelings are.

                                                                                They have been improving it in a nice pace in 2018. It feels to me that the Teams team in Microsoft is culturally similar to the Visual Code Studio folks – i.e. part of the new Microsoft.

                                                                                Like dsschnau says, you can probably find better solutions if you’re not in the Office365 bearhug already. But they won’t be massively better (unless you want the burden of hosting yourself, in which case there are plenty of choices). If you are paying for office365 (not to mention Azure/VSTS/TFS) already, getting another chat solution in addition to Teams would be just stupid.

                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                  IME the Teams interface is extremely buggy (flashes of white, elements jumping around the screen, pretty severe lag/unresponsiveness) but I haven’t used it in 8 months.

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    I heard bad things from early adopters, but not not heard much recently. A quick play and the UI seems OK, but issues like you have described above tend to more noticeable after a bit of use.

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  I’ve liked the idea of Gopher but one minor annoyance is how the server gets to dictate the appearance and layout of text (WRT manually-wrapped paragraphs).

                                                                                  1. 6

                                                                                    When you’re posting information publicly in a social network, the trust of your server operator, besides moderation tasks, is really just tantamount to “person I know who will serve my information to others, and others to me.” And when the biggest issues are to cut costs of usage (utilize existing web server infrastructure) and interaction (delegating what would otherwise be massively time-consuming fully distributed self-moderation to operator-led moderation) the best course of action then is to essentially create a system of public forums that can exchange information between one another. And since these are the actual concerns of most users, I don’t really think these users would see much of a reason to fragment their social spaces further.

                                                                                    On a public social network, distributed or centralized, can’t anyone who’s spent enough time scraping trivially derive social graphs? Didn’t a lot of users migrate to Mastodon because they considered the ability of instances to block instances they’d prefer to not interact with desirable?

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      Instance owners also have complete access to private posts and DMs, which many users may not be aware of.

                                                                                      1. 5

                                                                                        This has nothing to do with federation though. It’s just a Mastodon thing. There are federated protocols that use end to end encryption.

                                                                                    1. 12

                                                                                      I think of Material Design more of a safety net. We can’t expect every app maker to be proficient in design and creating something interesting, unique, and useful. MD saves the average app developer from making a really really terrible app. Yes, you still have to understand the design philosophy, the guidelines, the patterns. But it’s easier to use a set of components Google has made for you and copy patterns that occur in the MD-complaint apps.

                                                                                      Disclaimer: I work at the GOOG.

                                                                                      1. 8

                                                                                        As a backend developer that has had to take on the lead on a few front end projects, this is a massive win. You can simply follow material design spec and get solving problems, then when someone queries why you have done something or wants something changed, you can just quote the material spec and get on with solving real problems.

                                                                                        1. 7

                                                                                          “real problems”

                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            and get on with solving real problems.

                                                                                            I think if the application in question is small enough, then this might hold true; however once the project gains any significant complexity or scope then I’d say having a backend developer work on UI might cause a few ‘real problems’ of its own ;)

                                                                                            1. 3

                                                                                              This an example of the kind of conclusion you don’t want to jump to. Material Design may be a good stand-in, but it is ultimately a one-size-fits-all solution to a problem (yes, a real one 😉) that is inherently case-by-case. It helps developers speed through UI design; it does not solve UI design. As much as Google may want you to believe that convenient untruth.

                                                                                          1. 4

                                                                                            Leopold FC something – tenkeyless, ANSI layout, Cherry MX Brown switches, blank keycaps.

                                                                                            As for customizations (in software): Colemak + shifts as parens + CapsLock as Control/Escape.

                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                              Ditto! I never got into alternate layouts because it seemed like it’d take years of practice to become as fast as you were with QWERTY/AZERTY.

                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                I wasn’t very fast with QWERTY, I only learned to properly type with Colemak :)

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                                                                                              I’m surprised that the author managed to follow around 5000 (if I understood the article correctly) people on Twitter. it seems like the amount of noise on your feed would make it unusable at that point.

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                                                                                                I’m following 867 and my timeline is too much sometimes. I follow virtually no celebrities, a few politicians, a handful of the StockTwits old guard (the whole reason I joined Twitter 10 years ago), and a whole lot of tech people.

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                                                                                                  Agree. I try to give myself a limit of about 400, because that’s the point where I’ve noticed that it becomes unmanageable. Right now I am following 525, and am overdue for some pruning, but I’m not sure how to do that effectively. :/