1. 1

    I really don’t want this to be a plug/promotion, so apologies in advance if it comes across as one… but this is exactly why I stopped working for companies that build bloated websites (web agencies, Time, BBC) and took a job at SpeedCurve. We’re trying to build a tool that really demonstrates the impact that performance has on the people who use the web every day, and that helps developers make the changes required to deliver their pages quickly.

    It’s frustrating that the status quo for a web page these days seems to be 5MB of JavaScript that manages to spin the fans on even my i7 XPS 13. How are people in the developing world supposed to browse the web on their $150 Android phones? I wish things were looking up but they’re getting worse every year and we’re well beyond the point of hardware being able to keep up.

    I don’t really have a point to all of this rambling. I’m just so upset that the web has turned into this absolute shit show.

    1. 14

      This blog post: a case study in being a jerk to someone who is being a jerk, only since Linus is a “jerk” you get off scott-free. Unsurprisingly, this is written by someone who has never contributed to the Linux kernel and who was uninvolved in the discussion he’s picking apart.

      The revised email at the end does lose information. Contrary to what hipsters write blog posts complaining about, 99% of Linus’s emails are cordial. The information that’s lost is the conveyance that this is more important to Linus than most subjects.

      1. 20

        This comment: a case study in being a jerk to someone who is being a jerk to a jerk.

        In all seriousness, I don’t believe that Gary Bernhardt is being a jerk at all. There’s a line between being critical of a piece of work and calling someone brain damaged, and hopefully, we all can see the difference.

        Aside: I love when people use the word “hipster” to invalidate other viewpoints. Apparently, there are two modes of being: Being Right and Being A Hipster.

        1. 2

          To the unserious comment, I don’t think I was being a jerk. I called him a jerk, which I guess you could argue is a jerk move under any circumstances, but if I’m being a jerk then so is Gary.

          To the serious comment, I just want to note that “brain damaged” is a meme among old school hackers which isn’t as strong of a word as you think.

          To the aside, I don’t use hipster as an insult or to imply wrongness, but I do use it to invalidate his point. Gary is a Ruby developer. Linus is a kernel developer. The worlds are far removed from each other.

          1. 50

            I’ve put tens of thousands of lines of C into production, including multiple Linux kernel drivers. In one case, those kernel drivers were critical-path code on a device used in strain testing the wings of an airplane that you might’ve flown in by now.

            I’m not a stranger to the kernel; I just left that world. Behavior like Linus’ in that email was part of the reason, though far from the only reason.

            With all of that said: having written a bunch of systems software shouldn’t be a prerequisite for suggesting that we avoid attacking people personally when they make programming mistakes, or what we suspect are programming mistakes.

            1. 10

              Exactly. I’ve also met many people that do high-performance, embedded, and/or safety-critical code in C that are more polite in these situations. Linus’ attitude is a separate issue from what’s necessary to evaluate and constructively criticize code.

            2. 17

              “brain damaged” is a meme among old school hackers which isn’t as strong of a word as you think.

              Yikes. That “meme” is a whole other thing I don’t even care to unpack right now.

              I don’t use hipster as an insult or to imply wrongness, but I do use it to invalidate his point. Gary is a Ruby developer. Linus is a kernel developer. The worlds are far removed from each other.

              Gotcha. Kernal developer == real old-school hacker. Ruby developer == script kiddie hipster. Are we really still having this argument in 2018?

              1. 2

                Yikes. That “meme” is a whole other thing I don’t even care to unpack right now.

                “Brain damaged” is a term from back in the Multics days, Linus didn’t make that one up for the occasion. If you’re unfamiliar with the “jargon file” aka hacker dictionary, you can see the history of this particular term here: http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/B/brain-damaged.html

                1. 1

                  Yikes. That “meme” is a whole other thing I don’t even care to unpack right now.

                  Listen, cultures are different and culture shock is a thing. I’m in a thread full of foreigners shocked that customs are different elsewhere. You better just take my word for it on “brain damaged” because you clearly aren’t a member of this culture and don’t know what you’re talking about.

                  Gotcha. Kernal developer == real old-school hacker. Ruby developer == script kiddie hipster. Are we really still having this argument in 2018?

                  How about you quit putting words in my mouth? Do you really need me to explain the world of difference between Ruby development and kernel hacking? In 2018? It’s not a matter of skill. Gary is great at what he does, but it has almost nothing to do with what Linus does. The people who surround Gary and the people who surround Linus are mutually exclusive groups with different cultural norms.

                  1. 21

                    You can’t use “it’s our culture” as a panacea; calling someone an idiot, moron etc. is a deliberate attempt to hurt them. I guess if what you’re saying is, “it’s our culture to intentionally hurt the feelings of people who have bad ideas,” well, then we might be at an impasse.

                    1. 22

                      The kind of toxic exclusivity and “old school hacker culture” elitism that you’re spouting in this thread is not what I expect to see on Lobsters. It makes me genuinely sad to see somebody saying these things and it also makes me apprehensive of ever being involved in the same project or community as you. Software development today is not what it was 20 –or even 5– years ago. Today it is far more about people than it is about software or technology. You may not like this, but it is the reality.

                      1. 7

                        Lobste.rs always had a few vocal people like this in threads. But note that they’re in the minority and generally are not upvoted as much as the people who aren’t elitist, racist, or just generally being a jerk.

                        1. 5

                          “old school hacker culture” elitism

                          Near 40, I can agree to be called old. But not elitist.
                          And I cannot accept to be associated with racist.

                          Not all software developers are hackers. Not all hackers are software developers.

                          Is stating this “elitism”? Is it “racism”? Is it being “jerk”?
                          Or is just using terms properly?

              2. 5

                The information that’s lost is the conveyance that this is more important to Linus than most subjects.

                So add “I want to stress that this issue is really important to me” at the end of the revised email.

                I think that making an issue out of this particular information being lost is missing the point - that it would be possible to say the same thing as Linus did without being abusive.

                Contrary to what hipsters write blog posts complaining about

                You’re falling into the same trap that the post discusses. This derision isn’t necessary to make your point, and doesn’t make it any stronger - it just adds an unnecessary insult.

                1. 9

                  Contrary to what hipsters write blog posts complaining about, 99% of Linus’s emails are cordial.

                  That may well be true, but do we need that last 1% in a professional setting?

                  1. 9

                    (I am not defending Linus’ behaviour here, please don’t put those words in my mouth.)

                    I strongly take issue with American ideas of “professionalism”, and an even more so with the idea that we get to decide whether this project is “a professional setting” or not. What exactly makes this a “professional setting”? What is a “professional setting”? Why do we hold some interactions to higher standards than others?

                    I suspect “money changing hands” is the thing that makes this “a professional setting”, and that grinds my gears even further. Why are we supposed to hold ourselves to different standards just because some people are getting paid for doing it?

                    1. 3

                      Right, “professionalism” implies that you only need to be nice to somebody when you want them to something for you or want their money. This should actually be about “respect”, whether or not you want a Linux contributor to do something for you or want their money.

                    2. 12

                      The Linux kernel is not a professional setting. Besides, I argue that the 1% is useful, even in a professional setting - sometimes strong words are called for. I’ll be That Guy and say that people should grow a thicker skin, especially people who weren’t even the subject of the email and have never been involved in kernel development.

                      1. 14

                        If I look at who the contributors to the Linux kernel are, it would certainly appear to be a professional endeavor.

                        A large chunk of contributions to the kernel are made by people who are getting paid by the companies they work for to contribute. Sounds like a professional setting to me.

                        1. 4

                          Linux development is only “a professional endeavour” (which is a phrase I have strong issues with, see above) because some people decided to build their businesses in Linus’ craft room. We can like or dislike Linus’ behaviour, but we don’t get to ascribe “professionalism” or lack thereof (if there even is such a thing) to Linus’ work or behaviour, or that of any of the contributors.

                          Even if “professionalism” is an actual thing (it’s not; it’s just a tool used by people in power to keep others down) it’s between the people doing the paying, and the people getting the pay, and has nothing to do with any of us.

                          This idea that people should behave differently when there’s money involved is completely offensive to me.

                          1. 7

                            But it’s not. It’s a collaboration between everyone, including professionals and hobbyists. The largest group of kernel contributors are volunteers. On top of that, Linus doesn’t have to answer to anyone.

                            1. 8

                              So, having a hobbyist involved means that you can be dickhead? Is that the conclusion that should be drawn from your statements?

                              1. 3

                                No. I’m saying that Linus is not a dickhead, Linux is not a professional endeavour, and neither should be held to contrived professional standards.

                                1. 2

                                  “I’m saying that Linus is not a dickhead”

                                  His comments are proving otherwise given the main article shows the same information could’ve been conveyed without all the profanity, personal insults, and so on. He must be adding that fluff because he enjoys it or has self-control issues. He’s intentionally or accidentally a dick. I say that as a satirist whose a dick to people that give me headaches in real life. Although it doesn’t take one to know one, being someone whose always countering dicks and assholes with some dickish habits of his own makes what Linus is doing more evident. If no mental illness, there’s little excuse past him not giving a shit.

                                  1. 5

                                    “doesn’t behave according to my cultural norms” == “mental illness”

                                    Seriously?

                                    I would really appreciate it if you could stop expecting that your cultural norms have to apply to everyone on the planet.

                                    1. 1

                                      Im identifying the cultural norm of being an asshole, saying it applies to him at times, and saying the project would benefit if he knocked if off. Im not forcing my norms on anyone.

                                      Your comment is more amusing giving someone with Linus’s norns might just reply with profanity and personsl insults. Then, you might be complaining about that. ;)

                                      1. 1

                                        Then, you might be complaining about that. ;)

                                        No, I’d just accept that people from different cultures behave differently.

                                        Let’s face it, most people hate getting told they are wrong, regardless of the tone. That’s just how we are as humans.

                                        Taking offense about the tone just seems very US-specific, as they are accustomed to receiving some special superpowers in a discussion by uttering “I’m offended”.

                                        Some of the best feedback I received in my life wouldn’t be considered acceptable by US standards and I simply don’t care – I just appreciate the fact that someone took his time to spell out the technical problems.

                                        Here is a recent example: https://github.com/rust-lang/cargo/pull/5183#issuecomment-381449546

                                        1. 1

                                          Here is a recent example: https://github.com/rust-lang/cargo/pull/5183#issuecomment-381449546

                                          I’m not familiar with Rust, so maybe I’m missing crucial context, but I read this feedback as firm but unproblematic overall. Compared to Linus’ email:

                                          • Comment admits that there are multiple points of view, gives case for their take on it.
                                          • Focuses on the problems at hand rather than speculating on characteristics of any individuals involved, beyond acknowledging other viewpoints.
                                          • Doesn’t include any personal insults.
                                          • Doesn’t include any profanity that I noticed, certainly not gratuituous profanity.

                                          It could be nicer, sure. But it seemed respectful, in the “you can do what you’re doing but consider these things:” kind of way…? The author event went out of their way to acknowledge being unconstructive.

                                          To my reading it seemed closer to Gary’s email than Linus’.

                                          To put it another way: if Linus wrote emails like this (only shorter, probably) then I don’t think Gary would have written a blog post about it.

                                          (For the record: I’m not American, but I do fall on the gee-it’d-be-great-if-Linus-stopped-abusing-his-colleagues side of this debate.)

                                          1. 1

                                            I didn’t intend to imply that this was comparable to Linus’ mail, but that people who would be offended by Linus’ writing would also be offended by that comment.

                                            It’s a slippery slide where every honest-to-go comment that expresses real feelings starts getting replaced by “this is an interesting idea, but did you consider …” corporate lingo, even if the code is horribly wrong.

                                            1. 2

                                              I didn’t intend to imply that this was comparable to Linus’ mail, but that people who would be offended by Linus’ writing would also be offended by that comment.

                                              I understand this is your point, but I think there is no evidence for this. The people complaining about Linus’ conduct are complaining about specific things, and these things are not present in the comment you linked.

                                              Did anyone in the Rust community (generally considered a “nicer” community than kernel development) raise concerns about this comment?

                                              There is a difference between “not overtly nice” and “openly abusive”, even accounting for cultural context.

                                          2. 1

                                            Then you and I arent that different in how we look at stuff. Ive just layered on top of it a push for project owners to do what’s most effective on social side.

                                      2. 2

                                        I believe it’s intentional. He does not want to be bothered by nurturing the newbs, so he deters them from going to him directly and forces them to do their learning elsewhere.

                                      3. 2

                                        These numbers suggest it is a professional endeavor:

                                        https://thenewstack.io/contributes-linux-kernel/

                                        1. 2

                                          Those numbers just break down the professionals involved, and don’t consider the volunteers. If you sum the percentages in that article you get around 40%. Even accomodating for smaller companies that didn’t make the top N companies, that’s a pretty big discrepancy.

                                2. 6

                                  Linus himself is working in a professional capacity. He’s employed by the Linux Foundation to work on Linux. The fact he is employed to work on an open source project that he founded doesn’t make that situation non-professional.

                            1. 2

                              Considering the pros of defer, there seems to be very little usage for async.

                              if you specify both, async takes precedence on modern browsers, while older browsers that support defer but not async will fallback to defer.

                              So why would you use async at all? And why do newer browsers even bother to support it?

                              1. 7

                                There are some (admittedly edge case) scenarios where async is still desirable. For example on the BBC News homepage if we loaded our scripts with defer, a bunch of non-defer third-party scripts would execute first and make the page feel slow. We used async instead, so that parsing isn’t blocked while the script is being fetched but it is blocked once the script is available so we can enhance the page and make it feel complete without having to wait for other scripts to execute first.

                                1. 2

                                  Thanks for writing this, I found very little information online on when to use async is a better choice, I added a bit more information to consider this scenario 👍🏼

                              1. 2

                                To their credit, somebody at NatWest realised what was going on and they have now promised to fix it: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-42353478

                                1. 2

                                  So does anyone want to speculate on the “angle” here for MS? Superficially it seems to be about getting developers to run Windows, even if they’re working in ecosystems that don’t run well on Windows. For example, I use Dart a lot and I tried to set it up on Windows once so I could iterate on an IE bug more efficiently but it was a huge hassle. With WSL it would be no problem (I think). But is that really it? That just seems kind of… boring?

                                  1. 3

                                    I was wondering the exact same thing. I figured it could be to do with the fact that at pretty much any tech conference 9/10 people have a Macbook. Maybe MS are trying to win back some of the developer market share?

                                    1. 2

                                      Yes, exactly, given that most developers already need *nix tools and run either msys or cygwin it’s a natural move to emulate Linux kernel.

                                      Additionally Microsoft seems to build some serious emulation knowledge (x86 on ARM etc.)

                                    2. 3

                                      Microsoft has a serious Linux hosting offer on Azure and would like to keep developers developing for that ecosystem on Windows.

                                      For example, imagine developing a .NET application integrating into a Linux backend - this allows to emulate that quite easily without using VMs. Considering that Microsoft was always know for having great dev tooling through Visual Studio, I would imagine that extending integration into it would be a next step.

                                      1. 2

                                        Windows server still drives a fair bit of revenue for MS.

                                        When people started seeing substantial cost savings by adopting cooperatively scheduled containers (eg docker), MS moved pretty hard towards WSL and docker support.

                                        My theory is they got scared that server software would move to a deployment model that wouldn’t support Windows at all.

                                        1. 2

                                          IIRC, it sprung from an attempt for an Android subsystem for Windows 10 Mobile. When the compatibility layer didn’t work out and W10M isn’t doing so hot, why not retool it for something else?

                                          1. 2

                                            I don’t have the feeling “something failed, let’s just salvage it and do something else” is the Microsoft way of doing things.

                                        1. 10

                                          Here’s something note cited in the article that I think is an important point - it’s also a self fulfilling prophecy - I’m seeing more and more sites start to work poorly on Firefox, because there’s an unspoken “Yeah but all the cool kids use Chrome” thing happening among web developers.

                                          Kind of a shame, I use Firefox because I think having an open source web browser is super important so the web ecosystem doesn’t become a monoculture - but it’s getting harder all the time.

                                          1. 6

                                            Especially google services get worse and worse: No more hangout calls, youtube is sometimes weird, google drive takes forever to load etc. It is a damn shame. I want to stay on firefox, but my frustration is rising…

                                            1. 8

                                              The interesting (and sad) thing to note is that your frustration with Firefox is rising. In a just world, your frustration with the apps that work poorly in Firefox would be rising.

                                              1. 2

                                                True, but I cannot move away from gmail/hangouts and google drive since we use it at work. For my private life I can switch to/already use alternatives, but not for work. So that leaves me no choice really and move to chrome in the end :-(

                                                1. 4

                                                  I have chrome installed for those rare cases, but use firefox mainly. Mostly, because I like it :).

                                                  1. 3

                                                    I like to keep my work stuff isolated from regular browsing anyway, so for me this works out well with two browsers.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      I do the same but with Firefox and Firefox Developer Edition. Works great.

                                                2. 3

                                                  Yeah, I recently switched to Firefox from Chrome & the only things that haven’t worked for me are some of Google’s apps.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    Out of curiosity, what made you switch?

                                                    1. 4

                                                      Chrome is notoriously bad at memory consumption on Mac OS X and Firefox was recently rearchitected to isolate tabs better so I thought I’d give it a shot again and stuck with it.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        Just thought I’d take a moment to add that while Chrome’s js dev tools are a little ahead of Firefox’s, Firefox CSS dev tools absolutely take the cake. It’s why I probably won’t move away from Firefox for a long time.

                                                        1. 3

                                                          I do do much web frontend dev so neither of those is a factor for me. I just want to read stuff online without needing more than 4 GB of RAM.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Is this still the case? I’m not doubting you - #notawebdev - but FF has put a LOT of energy into improving its devtools lately.

                                                1. 2

                                                  I use Colemak on an ErgoDox at work, and Qwerty on my laptop at home. I find that the different hand position of the ErgoDox helps me switch between them seamlessly. It’s like my brain knows which muscle memory to use based on my hand position.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Does anybody know if the ebook will be available without the treebook?

                                                    1. 10

                                                      https://www.alchemistowl.org/pocorgtfo/

                                                      Here is the collection of all the published pocorgtfo articles, plus these ones can be written to a boot sector.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Thank you so much!

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Sorry, I was posting from my phone and everything sucks on such a small screen :(

                                                      1. 18

                                                        My knee-jerk reaction is: no, Wi-Fi isn’t going away. But let me present a few Interesting Facts™ about the state of the internet today:

                                                        • 65% of all internet users are from developing countries.
                                                        • This percentage will increase dramatically in the next 5 years — usage in developing countries is growing 100x faster than in developed countries.
                                                        • 70% of users in developing countries rely on cellular data alone (no WiFi!) to access the internet.
                                                        • This number is lower in developed countries (10%-20%) but is increasing rapidly.

                                                        Taking these trends into consideration, it’s not so far-fetched to imagine a world without Wi-Fi.

                                                        1. 8

                                                          Where are these facts from?

                                                          1. 19

                                                            Username checks out. :P

                                                            1. 7

                                                              If this sort of thing interests you and you have 25 minutes to spare, this talk by Tal Oppenheimer contains these facts and many more! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vmg1ECC2r2Q

                                                              Edit: if you don’t have much time, here are some bits I found:

                                                            2. 7

                                                              On the other hand, these people from developing countries probably don’t have access to super-fast LTE either, so having access to Wi-Fi would be an improvement for them.

                                                              This number is lower in developed countries (10%-20%) but is increasing rapidly.

                                                              Where do these numbers come from? They seem pretty high given that free Wi-Fi is everywhere nowadays. Are there any “heavy” internet users in that group or is it just people who replaced SMS with WhatsApp and aren’t even aware they’re on the internet now? Those people never really needed Wi-Fi anyways.

                                                              1. 8

                                                                You would be quite surprised. I’m in Kenya now and the 4G here is quite a bit better than my Sprint/Tmobile connection was in the US.

                                                                It’s kind of weird that in a rural Kenyan farm, where maybe 4 people in range of the cell tower have smartphones, I can get 4g.

                                                              2. 2

                                                                Even if your numbers are accurate, you could just as easily theorise that WiFi usage will increase in developing countries as demand grows.

                                                              1. 5

                                                                I mostly agree that plain HTML is a great way to go, and letting the browser display semantic markup however it likes (ideally well, and according to user preferences) is right.

                                                                But setting max-width to 800px? That jumps out as a very bad idea.

                                                                1. 11

                                                                  It’s pretty subjective, but I just picked it as a number that’s roughly in the range of what most text-oriented sites seem to use. Medium uses 700px, for example. My linked blog above uses a slightly wider 900px. BBC News uses a bit narrower 600px (not counting the right sidebar).

                                                                  1. 9

                                                                    I like limiting it to 52em^H 40 em. That way the printed page looks exactly like the web page. See for example: https://www.btbytes.com/notebooks/nim.html

                                                                    1. 9

                                                                      The BBC News article body width has had a surprising amount of thought and effort put in. The intention is to strike a balance between readability (~80 characters max per line) and aesthetics (too much whitespace on either side can look strange).

                                                                      The choice of 645px has worked well for the last several years but is too narrow on high resolution displays. We’re going to be rebuilding the article pages later this year and I hope we will take the approach of using rems instead of pixels, as mentioned by @btbytes.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        I think it’s better to specify a max-width in ems, because that naturally accommodates people with vision issues who’ve increased their font size to cope (and some older people apparently make fairly drastic font enlargements). How many ems it should be, I don’t know. I’m currently using 45 ems and the result seems okay, but I picked it more or less out of the air.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Hmm, that’s a good point. I didn’t realize it’s common for people set font size explicitly. (I know browsers support user-specified CSS, but thought of it as basically a “strictly for programmers” feature.) I personally like larger font size than most pages have by default, but I use the zoom function for that instead of specifying fonts in user-CSS, which is also what the elderly people i know do. From some testing, specifying max-width in ems or pixels behaves the same w.r.t. zoom. But there’s no real reason not to use ems afaict, so I might switch to that if there’s an advantage.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            This is interesting. I just did a test in (desktop) Firefox and Chrome, and they behave differently. In Firefox as I have it set (which is to not zoom images, just text), zooming does not change a max-width set in px, so the text on your page doesn’t get wider. In Chrome, zooming does apparently increase the max-width even when it’s set in px, so the text on your page gets wider, eventually going up to a full screen width. Given the difference in behavior it seems worthwhile to set the size in em.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              Odd. I was also basing my comment on testing desktop Firefox and Chrome (on OSX), which with the default settings for me both do zoom width on my blog post, and with seemingly identical behavior whether you specify px or em. I wonder if it’s your don’t-zoom-images setting for Firefox that turns off resizing of all pixel-specified areas' sizes, not just images per se? I don’t see an option for that in the prefs; is it one of the ones behind about:config?

                                                                      2. 5

                                                                        I’ve been persuaded that some max-width is a good idea. Some number of people do browse with their browsers in full-screen mode on wide (or absurdly wide) screens, and if you don’t limit your site’s width you get really long lines of text that are hard to read. It annoys me to have huge amounts of empty space that could be filled with something useful, but so it goes.

                                                                        (I prefer to center the text in an over-wide screen rather than leave it at the left side, but that’s a taste issue. I think it looks better in the full-screen browser scenario, and it puts the text hopefully straight in front of the person, if they’ve centered themselves in front of their screen.)

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          I like the long lines of text. I would ask site makers to please please find a way to let me have the long lines when I want them. If motherfuckingwebsite can manage to make it work then so can you.

                                                                          1. 4

                                                                            in typography a traditional line length is 2-3 alphabets long, aka like 60-70 characters. This usually falls much below 700px, so already web designers are more generous than say, magazine layout designers or newspapers - but having a line length that’s too long results in reader fatigue from too much left-right motion and not enough vertical.

                                                                            The effect of the fatigue is something testable and measurable - so no doubt news websites from profit from people clicking multiple stories will try not to strain the viewers eyes after reading their first article.

                                                                      1. 12

                                                                        There seem to be a lot of “Why AMP is Bad” posts lately, and I’ve been meaning to write a blog post from the other side. For now I’ll just say this:

                                                                        I’m a software engineer at BBC News. We have a huge web performance problem, which kind of counter-intuitively is not a technical problem. Performance for us is an organisational problem, because we have dozens of other BBC product owners who want to shoehorn their content/widget/whatever into BBC News pages.

                                                                        I have plenty of concerns about AMP, both technical and ethical. But when we joined the AMP trial, we immediately saw higher user engagement on our AMP pages. This ended up being a massive catalyst for a shift towards performance-focused culture across the whole of BBC News. People are curious why AMP has better engagement, and we’ve actually had conversations about how we can make the regular pages more like the AMP pages. It’s enabled me to speak openly[1] without fear of annoying upper management about my opinion that BBC News is a content site, and we should build it to be content-first.

                                                                        I know it’s easy to see AMP as Yet Another Evil Google Thing, but that completely ignores the fact that —like most big organisations— Google is quite fragmented. The people who run the AMP project genuinely care about web performance. Not a single one of them is thinking about Google’s ad revenue. All they care about is building a platform that gets content in front of users quickly, without the usual cruft that fills up most web sites.

                                                                        [1] https://wildlyinaccurate.com/redefining-the-bcc-news-core-experience/

                                                                        1. 5

                                                                          I’m currently planning a software as a service extension to Hypothesis. I’m going to be trying to sort out a bunch of the details this week, though it’s fairly disrupted by travel.

                                                                          I’ve also recently switched my development environment from Linux to Windows, so a lot of what I’m actually working on this week is going to be just figuring out how that works and questioning my life choices.

                                                                          1. 6

                                                                            Linux to Windows, what are doing with your life to make such a crazy move ?

                                                                            1. 5

                                                                              Mostly getting bored of broken hardware support and punitively slow browser implementations.

                                                                              The actual work is mostly still happening on Linux in VMs (currently via Vagrant). Windows is just acting as the host operating system.

                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                Ah ok, doesn’t look that bad then. I guess you don’t miss the fancy windows managers of linux and the its-open-source-source-and-there-s-no-malwares-preinstalled thing ?

                                                                                1. 5

                                                                                  I guess you don’t miss the fancy windows managers of linux

                                                                                  I was actually going to be running a Linux VM as a desktop environment because I thought I would (I usually run i3), but it turns out that Windows 10 window management is actually really good (and running graphical VMs is awful).

                                                                                  and the its-open-source-source-and-there-s-no-malwares-preinstalled thing ?

                                                                                  I’ve really got very little benefit from it being open source other than the ability to occasionally cargo cult other people’s workarounds to shit that shouldn’t be broken in the first place. (And it being free as in beer of course, but I don’t mind paying for things). In terms of malware, eh. I wouldn’t use a vendor provided version of windows but vanilla windows 10 from a fresh install doesn’t have notably more malware than you get out of Ubuntu and a modern browser anyway.

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                                                                                    That’s true that to protect yourself from tracking it’s many layers but having the OS come with backdoors and heavy tracking is a bit too much for me. Security on linux is a bit a joke so I understand that it’s a comprise on many things. Wanna try win10 windows management now !

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                                                                              Cygwin may save you from your quandary. Haven’t tried it myself, but I understand it to essentially be “*nix for Windows”.

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                                                                                Or even better, you can run Bash on Ubuntu on Windows!

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                                                                                  But can I run Blink on Qt on Python on Jupyter on Bash on Ubuntu on Windows?

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                                                                                    Probably? Try it and report back.

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                                                                                  I’m using it a bit (mostly to get a good terminal emulator), but I’m not really convinced it solves the problem at a sufficiently deep level. The approach I’m taking is basically to develop on Windows but not actually try to run code on Windows and it seems to work pretty OK so far.

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                                                                                As somebody who has been on the fence about Go for a long time, this was a welcome take on things and has convinced me to try Go again. Thanks for the write-up.

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                                                                                  The subject of this post (somebody impersonating a bot and sending malicious PRs) is interesting in itself, but there are also some really important messages in there.

                                                                                  The open source community is full of real, human people. People with their own complex lives, their own priorities, their own struggles. Yet time and time again we see this “entitled and toxic behaviour” which the author refers to. I’m tired of seeing my friends and colleagues worn down by snarky bug reports, aggressive twitter mobs, and ad hominem attacks presented as “insightful” blog posts.

                                                                                  How can we fix this? How many more people need to suffer before we pull our collective heads in and make this community something to be proud of?

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                                                                                    I’m not going to justify such behavior, but sadly this is natural among human beings. What you hope for will never happen. They are acting as such because they don’t know better, but they are made the same as us. The best you can do to get over mean, avid or stupid actions is to accept them as part of the game of life and move on. Your time here is limited, don’t waste it worrying about such petty things. For more on the topic, Marcus Aurelius Meditations book 2:1 (http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2133#Aurelius_1464_167)

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                                                                                      I don’t buy that one bit. Society has come along in leaps and bounds to conquer discrimination and encourage equality. This hasn’t happened because people accepted things and moved on. It happened because people questioned the status quo and spoke loudly against these “accepted” behaviours.

                                                                                      No, I think we can fix this. Being selfish and thoughtless is not intrinsic to being human. We can be better.

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                                                                                        I think to achieve that we have to be willing to make people better. Our brains are capable of conceptualizing maybe 170 people as people; beyond that we have to objectify them for our own sanity. Maybe tools can help up to a point, but this feels like a fundamental restriction to our current hardware (not comparable to extending empathy to wider groups, which was the big step in overcoming a lot of discrimination).

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                                                                                          I agree and disagree, but believe me, the last thing I was trying to preach was being selfish. The man is a social animal and interacting with your kin is the job. I would really love to finish this conversation in front of a beer. I’m in Chicago, and I’m serious. First round on me if you happen to be around.

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                                                                                      For me, the main problem with SVG is that I can’t find a way to re-colour them through regular CSS. Is this possible?

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                                                                                        If you include them directly in the DOM, you can style them with CSS.

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                                                                                          Interesting. It would be nice if you could style them without also having to inline them in your HTML

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                                                                                            You can inline them once and reuse them multiple times with the <use> tag. Or if you prefer, you can avoid inlining them altogether and just reference a remote file like this:

                                                                                            <svg>
                                                                                              <use xlink:href="images/icons.svg#my-icon"></use>
                                                                                            </svg>
                                                                                            
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                                                                                              THANK YOU! This is the solution I’ve been looking for. Note that if you are experimenting with this on codepen or similar, you may have trouble getting it to work since browsers don’t like cross-origin URI’s in the <use> tag.

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                                                                                              Yeah, I know, I’ve wished that many a time. I think there are JS libraries to load the SVG into the DOM for you, but I haven’t worked with SVG in a few months so I’m not sure.

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                                                                                          The last language I learned was Elm (http://elm-lang.org/) and I’m thoroughly enjoying using it to build some simple front-ends. I’m currently trying to level up my Haskell skills to “intermediate”, and I aspire to pick up an ML language (probably OCaml) in the near future.

                                                                                          It might sound strange, but I recommend learning Elm as a way of learning Haskell. The Elm documentation (http://elm-lang.org/docs) really helped me to understand pure functional principles, and the syntax is similar enough to Haskell that you can immediately transfer knowledge between the two languages.

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                                                                                            Nice site. God awful slow for me though.

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                                                                                                Almost like they didn’t even try to make this load semi quickly. >30 seconds on my very fast work internet connection.

                                                                                                EDIT:

                                                                                                I wonder if a big part of that is server load?

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                                                                                              The summary text which Lobsters scraped pretty much sums up what is wrong with single page web apps:

                                                                                              Oops! It appears you’re using an unsupported browser. Old browsers can put your security at risk, are slow and are not compatible with the Google Fiber website. To continue browsing our site, you’ll need to update to a modern

                                                                                              Edit: That and the fact that the Check your address form seems to be completely broken. Apologies for the super-negative tone but this sort of thing is fast becoming the rule rather than the exception.

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                                                                                                Very little attention is paid, it seems, to accessibility. More and more we have sites that are usable only in a months-old browser version on a whiz-bang internet connection. It has somehow become okay to require users to download the bulk of your application to their local machine and then do the rendering work themselves. Sure, it’s great if you’re running a server and don’t want to do any real work there, but it’s a bad deal for the users, who see their bandwidth eaten alive and their CPU running hot to render a news site and all the attendant ads. And if you’re on a screen reader or using any assistive technology, good luck. Hopefully we haven’t cluelessly broken everything in a quest to make our website into an “app” (whatever the heck that means). Seriously, whatever happened to KISS? Start with some basic HTML (using the niceties of the HTML5 spec with some ARIA roles. They’ve been around long enough now), make it pretty with some CSS (avoiding non-hardware-accelerated animations), and then add some JS for fun and flavor. It is not that hard. If things are too slow, cache smartly and setup a CDN. Unless you’re getting huge traffic, you don’t need more.

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                                                                                                  Very little attention is paid, it seems, to accessibility.

                                                                                                  Do you mean in this case or in general?

                                                                                                  Angular 1 has supports for accessibility. Are you saying that it is not good?

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                                                                                                    Very little attention is paid, it seems, to accessibility.

                                                                                                    Word. Particularly apposite, given the classic Yegge post currently sharing the front page.

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                                                                                                    what browser are you using?

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                                                                                                      If you have the feature turned on, Lobsters will show you the first sentence or two of the linked page. In this case, the text that Lobsters found was the default “hey, you don’t support javascript, or your browser is too old.”

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                                                                                                        Did not know about the preview function. Thanks!