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    It talks about magnet links present in the dump, some of which happens to be active. Can a magnet link tell what you are downloading or the file(s) it points to without downloading it?

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      You can fetch the metadata from peers in the swarm without having to actually download the files, but as far as I know you can’t get the filename without downloading the metadata. Some magnet links encode the filename along with it though.

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        Yes, magnet links may optionally include a “dn” parameter for the display name.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnet_URI_scheme#Parameters

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      I’m currently trying to hack together some sort of text editor, and learn some ClojureScript.

      I’m embedding and forking Servo to render stuff, with NeoVim running as a daemon. I don’t really know if it will actually get anywhere, but it’s definitely an interesting learning experience.

      1. 1

        How easy is it to embed Servo? I’m curious since I haven’t seen any web browsers based on it yet, besides FF. Everything still seems to be Chrome based.

        1. 1

          It’s… interesting. It wasn’t actually that difficult, just not amazingly documented. The documentation that was there is a little outdated* and I had to figure it out. The main issue is just that it’s changing really quickly at the moment.

          I’d definitely recommend having a go if you want, but I wouldn’t call it production ready.

          *: I am planning on making a PR when I get the time!

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            Interesting - that explains why I haven’t seen it used. Hoping the embedding gets better soon - I’d like to see servo in something like QuteBrowser.

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        I’d love to switch to WireGuard but still waiting for either a slow userspace port to android or support in my ROMs (Copperhead OS) kernel for it, until then I still need IPSec for my phone and so switching the rest of my infrastructure does not really make sense.

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          I’m currently using ShadowSocks on my phone, and it’s fantastic. Worth looking at? WireGuard on everything I can though.

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          This is about a month and a half old now, but it’s the most complete example of using futures/tokio stuff that I’ve seen yet.

          1. 3

            One thing that’s slowed down examples is that 0.2 of both tokio and futures have been neigh for a bit, and are major refactoring. So I know I’ve been putting off writing stuff with them, at least, until they ship. Soon!

            1. 1

              Heh, yeah, I just saw last night that the 0.2.0-alpha went up on docs.rs for the futures crate. I realize it’s probably a bit early for a “what has changed”, but are there any older “this is what we’re planning” blog post or an RFC of something around anywhere to see what the plan was for what’s changing?

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                  Thanks Steve. You, all by yourself, are seriously a significant part of what makes the rust community so great.

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                    <3

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              but it’s the most complete example of using futures/tokio stuff that I’ve seen yet.

              I agree, I’ve been reading a lot about that recently and this example is very nice!

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              There are a few reasons for me clinging to MacOS for work (I’m a network engineer, and I code a bit too). The overshadowing first reason is called Microsoft Office. I wish I didn’t have to use it, but I have so far not been able to properly dodge it and my current employer is entangled beyond belief in the whole Microsoft ecosystem with OneDrive, Teams, Yammer, OneNote et. al. that I’m aware of nice cross-platform replacements for, but stuck with.

              Similarly, I’m depending on OmniGraffle to display and create visio (compatible) drawings.

              So why not just run Windows? Well, I had a go at that although not by personal choice when I started my current employment half a year ago, where I was handed a mediocre HP laptop while waiting for my Macbook Pro to be available, and it was quite terrible to work with. It became bearable when I had my emacs setup tuned, and I could sort of live inside emacs, but it was a poor substitute for the terminals and unix tools I’ve come to depend on.

              Another reason, and that may just me being scared from previous experience running Linux for work, and that’s the whole multiple display thing. I have multiple displays at my home office at different rotations, and a widescreen monitor at work. Switching between multiple displays was never painless when I ran Linux, but that may have improved since then Still the point about different DPIs have been raised elsewhere here, so I believe it at least partly still applies.

              And then there’s stability. It is entirely possible to have a stable Linux environment, but not perpetually. Something will break between releases and you’re forced to tinker and be unproductive. I enjoyed that part when I was younger, and I still do for my hobby systems. But for work, I just want things to work.

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                Multi monitor is definitely why I stay on OS X. Perfect it is not, but as someone that has hand edited x.org files in the past, i’ve never had a great experience with multiple monitors.

                And osx with nix basically solves all my needs for a unix os. I get emacs and anything else out of there.

                If I were to switch to linux on the desktop it would probably be nixos, least then I can easily move between stable islands of software at once with sane backing out of things.

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                  I’ve often ran multi-monitor setups on Linux, and the selection of monitors has usually been rather odd. I usually use arandr to arrange and set them up, and… it just works.

                  Just curious what sorts of issues you had?

                  1. 3

                    Mostly plugging things in and having the window layouts work sanely. Also at issue tended to be putting the laptop to sleep and unplugging the monitor and not having anything come back up until I rebooted the laptop etc…

                    In a nutshell, edge cases all over, not that osx doesn’t have its own similar problems it tends not to lose the ability to display a screen.

                2. 2

                  Multimonitor support is 90% of why I’m planning to test drive moving away from OSX back to windows :)

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                    Have you run into the bug where sleeping with a monitor attached causes everything to black screen forever? Haven’t been able to escape that :/

                    I’d want to move to Windows too, but the privacy policy creeps me out.

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                      Yes. It happens not very often, but just often enough to make me irritated at the best of times. (And I still get the occasional panic on plugging in or removing a monitor.)

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                        I get all my windows moved to one monitor 95% of the time the displays come back on, and there’s a bug in the video card driver (Mac Pro Toob) that crashes everything on-screen (except the mouse pointer) and also crashes displayport audio, but leaves every application running as if everything were peachy. That one gets me every few weeks or so.

                        Also, I used to run 2 * UHD displays at 60hz, a third at 30hz. But now I can only run one at 60hz, both others run at 30. It’s fucked and it shits me to tears. When I bought it this was the top-shelf you could get, and while I cheaped out on core count, I went for the higher-end video option.

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                    Yeesh; hard not to cringe while reading thru it and seeing how reflective the display is in the photos.

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                      Had this discussion recently - decided that I’d actually be willing to pay more for a matte screen, even though the trend seems to be the opposite.

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                        Same. I have put off buying a new macbook since 2009, because apple doesn’t sell matte screens anymore. Starting to research after-market screen overlays to reduce reflection – this ol’ clunker laptop is starting to die I think.

                        1. 3

                          2009 was a good year for laptops; after hearing some noises on my 2009 thinkpad I’m starting to think it’s time to build up a stockpile to last out this stupid screen fad.

                        2. 2

                          I’ve heard that matter screens tend to be less sharp, so having a matte screen will not mesh well with high resolution screens.

                          Not sure if this is actually true though

                          1. 3

                            I have a matte filter on just about everything. There’s a certain blur, but it’s minimal. It’s way sharper than a low res screen.

                            1. 1

                              Any good filter recommendations?

                              1. 1

                                I just get whatever “PET anti glare” screen protector fits the device. Like $10 for a 3 pack on Amazon?

                          2. 2

                            I strongly prefer glossy screens, because they are more color accurate, and I don’t use my machine in direct sunlight.

                        1. 4

                          Working, and also I have university coursework, which to be honest I’m finding rather tiresome (we have to make a game with Java, and demonstrate the use of classes, among other things)

                          I do mostly Python at work, Java at uni, but outside of those I’m trying to learn as much Rust as I can - enjoying it a lot so far. I’m hoping to make a contribution to Rust at some point in the near future.

                          Otherwise, I have a couple of projects I’m working on in my free time.

                          1. 3

                            Interesting.

                            No facility exists for removing content. However, sharable blacklists can be used to prevent particular hashes from being stored locally or served to peers. Takedowns and safe harbor provisions apply not to the service (which has no servers) but to individual users, who (if they choose not to apply those blacklists) are personally liable for whatever information they host.

                            This is something I have given some thought to. I agree with things not being removable, however, who controls the blacklists? That’s an extraodinary level of power. Conversely, blacklists are likely to be reactive rather then proactive, and therefore it’s almost certain that at some point a user will end up hosting something that is illegal in one state or another - without even being aware of it. Which is also a problem.

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                              The key to making peer to peer work is groups. When everyone has to manage moderation, block lists, illegal content, and encryption by themselves, the overhead makes the network difficult if not impossible to use for most.

                              If you base these decisions on groups, much of the overhead can be amortized such that the cost of using the network is not much more than using a centralized, managed network like Facebook. Like-minded groups (say /r/science and /r/chemistry could collaborate on this to further reduce the workload).

                              You also get the benefit that TOFU is per group, not per individual. This greatly decreases the need for and importance of manual certificate verification

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                                That’s a very nice approach actually. Thanks for explaining!

                              2. 3

                                To be clear this is also the same thing that corporations deal with. Safe Harbor rules basically are what you would need here.

                              1. 3

                                Neat idea. How about making your .bash_history file a named pipe and have the script read from that, instead of using PROMPT_COMMAND?

                                1. 4

                                  I did this at a hackathon. I found it kept having weird sync issues with a lot of shells open, but didn’t have time to fully investigate.

                                  1. 1

                                    Won’t this block your shell after a while if the reading process somehow dies?

                                    1. 1

                                      Yep. Equally PROMPT_COMMAND could cause delays/hangs depending on connectivity to the remote system.

                                    2. 1

                                      That’s a very creative idea that I hadn’t thought of. I did want to avoid interfering with the client system’s history mechanism though.

                                      1. 1

                                        Ah, good point!

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                                      next week I’m out at a couple of conferences, so finding out who’s there (are you at dotSwift Paris or FOSDEM in Brussels?), highlighting the FOSDEM schedule and making sure my train tickets and hotel reservations are correct.

                                      I’ve been slowly progressing my HURD side project, though my work on it so far this week has been migrating the VM from my home PC to a laptop that I’ll take with me to FOSDEM.

                                      Work: some people management and team workflow things, doing job interviews, and then the odd bit of Javascript around the edges.

                                      Music: one of my bands is in a conference on Saturday so plenty of practice!

                                      1. 3

                                        Going myself to FOSDEM! First time there, I still have a ton of homework checking the talks I am going to attend, which I’m just constantly delaying, probably because it is overwhelming as hell.

                                        1. 1

                                          it is. The mobile apps have favourites and alarms which make it easier to navigate than reading the whole thing, but you still have some work to do to star the interesting sessions :)

                                        2. 2

                                          I’m also heading to FOSDEM! My first time, and also the first big event I’ve been to, so I’m not too sure what to expect.

                                          1. 1

                                            I found it overwhelming when I first went, there’s so much on. The talks will be videoed so if you have a choice meet people at the booths or dev rooms.

                                        1. 6

                                          Recently there’s been a lot of discussion of keyboard latency, as it is often much higher than reasonable. I’m interested in how much the self-built keyboard community is aware of the issue. Tristan Hume recently improved the latency of his keyboard from 30ms to 700µs.

                                          1. 2

                                            The Planck that Dan and I tested had 40ms of latency - not sure how much that varies from unit to unit though.

                                            1. 3

                                              I would expect very little, using the QMK firmware with a custom keymap. There’s typically only a handful of C with a couple ifs, no loops.

                                            2. 2

                                              Why are those levels of latency problematic? I would think anything under 50ms feels pretty much instantaneous. Perhaps for people with very high typing speeds or gamers?

                                              1. 1

                                                The end-to-end latency on a modern machine is definitely noticeable (often in the 100s of ms). Many keyboards add ~50 ms alone, and shaving that off results in a much nicer UX. It is definitely noticeable comparing, say, an Apple 2e (~25ms end-to-end latency) to my machine (~170ms end-to-end latency, IIRC).

                                              2. 1

                                                I recall reading about that. I’ll see about getting some measurements made, and see what it’s like on my Planck.

                                                I’m interested in how much the self-built keyboard community is aware of the issue

                                                I haven’t really seen much about it :/ If we could find an easy way of measuring latency without needing the RGB LEDs and camera, that would be good.

                                                1. 2

                                                  a simple trick - use a contact microphone (piezo), jack it into something like https://www.velleman.eu/products/view/?id=435532

                                              1. 1

                                                Thanks for the advice everyone! It’s been a huge help, and I’ve definitely been getting a bit more comfortable with things the more I work with it :)

                                                1. 26

                                                  I’m planning the hosting migration for Lobsters as the torch passes to me. Huge thanks to @alynpost for providing hosting and helping with the setup.

                                                  I finished my first week at Recurse Center. It’s a wonderful community. I’ve worked on my solitaire solver, built a planck keyboard, and paired with folks on rails and git.

                                                  This week I’m adding hspec and quickcheck (my nemesis - I can’t quite get how arbitrary, Gen, and property fit together) to the solitaire solver to drive out the four bugs I’ve found in the last few days. I’m also bringing Barnacles up-to-date with the Lobsters codebase as part of a deep dive into the Lobsters codebase to ensure I’m very comfortable with it.

                                                  1. 3

                                                    First of all, thank you so much for keeping the community running! I think there is no way to be grateful enough to volunteer efforts like this one.

                                                    Also, on a more mundane side note, how difficult is to build a Planck? How are you liking it up to now?

                                                    1. 5

                                                      It was very easy. It is my third soldering project - the first was a little $10 RadioShack kit that didn’t work and I couldn’t fix. The second was an Ergodox that I think had one or two solders I had to reflow. This had zero soldering errors. There’s several unedited videos of builds on YouTube.

                                                      I was down with the flu after I finished, so today will be my first day using it. I’m adopting a Norman layout, which I previously used on the Ergodox.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        I’ve built one recently as well, they’re really not too hard to solder, bearing in mind I hadn’t soldered in years. Typing on it right now, use it in lectures because it’s quiet - much nicer than a laptop keyboard :D

                                                      2. 3

                                                        First, thanks for stepping up for the community.

                                                        Secondly, about your issue with QuickCheck, Have you seen The Design and Use of QuickCheck tutorial? I found it helpful when I was reading up on QuickCheck a while back.

                                                        1. 3

                                                          Yes, though I failed to follow it in my admittedly sleep-addled state. I plan on giving it another try alongside HPFFP.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        I’ve taken on my first ever client project this week, which is exciting. I’ve never been paid any serious money to code before now.

                                                        1. [Comment removed by author]

                                                          1. 2

                                                            On that note, I think you can only really be relatively good. There isn’t a decent yardstick to measure yourself by, not afaik. If you’re mediocre and everyone at work is pretty bad, then of course you’re going to seem great, and perhaps be told so.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            This is great news! Just last night I realised I needed one for a project, was trying to find the cheapest option. Guess I might wait :D

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Working on some blogging software mostly, quite enjoying it. Perhaps starting my first proper piece of contract work as well!

                                                              1. 3

                                                                I’m not sure how accurate this actually is (then again, I’m 18…)

                                                                But surely age is not an indication of experience? Not all programmers have been programming since they were 8, that 45 year old may well have started in their late thirties - and it seems like this would negate most of the benefits, while the slight drawbacks still remain.

                                                                Besides, can’t you just hire the best person for the job, who cares how old they are.

                                                                1. 5

                                                                  This is an article about the advantages that come only with age, like experience in communicating, or wisdom about priorities. Most programming jobs have writing code as only a small part of the ways you contribute business value.

                                                                  When you’re older, hopefully you’ll appreciate that :)

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    Age is only a marker of how many days you have seen, it is a bit like exams, they prove you are good at exams, knowledge and time does not equal wisdom, its how you use that knowledge that shows wisdom. If you are willing to learn from your experiences, then that will be valuable, to you if not your current employer.

                                                                    Hiring the right person for the job is difficult, that is why there are so many recruitment agencies, hiring websites, and systems offering to find you the best staff for your needs, but we all bring bias to our hiring decisions and often unwittingly exclude the best candidates for all the wrong reasons. Hiring processes are often about whittling down the number from thousands of applicants to 3 or 4 to call for interview - and then choosing who appears to be the best interviewee on the day - and as a result not about the right person for the job. How do you know that the right people have even applied for the job?

                                                                    I’m currently re-reading my 1999 edition of What color is your parachute by Richard Bolles because I want to find employment that is more than just a job, but also leaves me enough time to do all the other things that interest and excite me.

                                                                  1. 25

                                                                    Happy birthday Lobsters!

                                                                    I’ve been a member of HN for much longer, yet this is the only place I actually comment on from time to time. It’s a much nicer community, and the links submitted are usually something I enjoy reading.

                                                                    Thanks @jcs, and everyone else on lobsters :D

                                                                    1. 6

                                                                      I dont think I’ve even opened HN in months!

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        I try not to. It only ever made me bitter.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Ditto. It’s a firehose, and much of it is useless to me - I’m not interested in startups and entrepreneurship.

                                                                        2. 3

                                                                          May Lobsters stay free of Redditization for many years to come.

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            Would a subreddit be a Lobste.rs shrimp?

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                                                                          I want one of these, pretty much. I just don’t want to deal with the hassle of it all. I hope news of an easier-to-get version of this kind of quality keyboard hits lobste.rs in the future ..

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            I’ll build you one for money :P

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              How much? How long will it take?