1.  

    Cool! At a glance, it looks a little like PicoLisp, but with more syntactic niceties and less database baked in.

    1.  

      Except PicoLisp uses dynamic scope :) Good thing Janet uses lexical scope.

      https://software-lab.de/doc/faq.html#dynamic

      I spent awhile looking at PicoLisp because I like these all-in-one systems. But they seemed to make a lot of compromises I couldn’t stomach in the name of simplicity, such as dynamic scope. I think he also says the interpreter will segfault under certain conditions and that’s not a bug, although I didn’t try it myself.

      1.  

        I personally agree that dynamic scope is crazy-pants, but the Common Lisp world seems to generally regard it as desirable, and they have their reasons. I’m definitely not up to rehashing the Lisp-1 vs Lisp-2 thing here, but just to be fair I’d like to point out that the justifications given for the choice of dynamic scope in the FAQ you linked are about performance and expressiveness, not simplicity.

        Again, I have no dog in that old fight, and I’m quite happy to see a new language in this space.

        1.  

          Dynamic scope is kinda good to have as an option. Where you see it go terribly wrong is when it’s the only option, or to a less extreme degree when it’s the default option.

          1.  

            i’ve always felt that dynamic scope was the reason lush never took off - i cannot think of any other reasons, because it looked really beautiful otherwise. (i never used it myself; it was already moribund by the time i discovered it, and yes, i was also personally reluctant to use a language with dynamic scoping)

          2.  

            Probably the most common case of segfaults is when you try to invoke a null symbol, which more or less attempts to execute code starting at 0x00 (I’ve tried it a little).

            PicoLisp did look quite interesting to me, but it makes a number of choices I wasn’t very excited about in the long term. Its concurrency system is built around fork/exec, which isn’t terrible if you’re on Unix, but makes porting PicoLisp to Windows very much a non-goal for the developers, at least from what I’ve seen. It also gives up floating point numbers, forcing you to set a fixed width fractional offset to do math.

            That being said, it packs a lot of tools in a small box.

            1.  

              Picolisp have fibers, checkout rings: https://bitbucket.org/mihailp/tankfeeder/src/default/rings/?at=default

              And dynamic binding is feature not illness.

        1. 8

          So, not seeing the entry for Lua yet, I’ll allow myself to hereby add it! By the way, I first learnt of the language exactly as part of an app where it was used as an application scripting language. I’m amazed by Lua as a language ever since.

          Other than that, I’m not sure if Red is embeddable as of today; but if not, I believe it could become a really interesting option in this area eventually.

          Finally, I’m recently learning Nim, and I find it very interesting. As subset of Nim called NimScript can be run in a VM, and can be made embedded in other programs (though it seems it’s not exactly a turn-key solution as of today).

          1. 9

            I have been using Lua as well, for about 12 years now. My main reasons are:

            • The simplicity of the (reference) implementation. Lua is about 16000 lines of C, any experienced programmer can read them and understand how the whole interpreter works. The same cannot be said of most other mainstream languages.

            • The wonderful language of the design. Nothing in Lua feels like a kludge to me. That is probably because it is designed and implemented by a very restricted core team, and not by committee.

            • The syntax is not S-expressions. As much as I want to like Lisp, I cannot bring myself to find that syntax pleasant to use in practice.

            • The ease of embedding it in C and sandboxing it. Some people do not like the Lua - C stack-based API, but to me it is one of the main selling points of the language. I have written bindings for other dynamic languages such as Python and Ruby, and compared to that experience doing the same for Lua is wonderful.

            And over the years, I have found an extra reason, which is the community. The Lua community is small but great, maybe in part because it is one of the few mainstream languages that does not originate from the Western block (Europe / USA). Because of that, its community is a mix from people from all over the world, from very different industries, who use the language in very different ways. Going to a Lua-related conference such as Lua Workshop is always a great time.

            1.  

              I think that the fact that Lua feels as well designed as it is is because it has had 5+ iterations with few considerations given to backwards compatability. Which isn’t to dog on it, but to more say that it’s had a lot more time to be refined in ways that would have not flown if an early version of Lua had been shipped in web browsers, like JS was.

              1.  

                Completely agreed.

              2.  

                All great points; but your third point reminded me that the unrelenting simplicity of the language does make it a fantastic compilation target. So Lua doesn’t support a s-expression-based syntax out of the box, but it can be added in roughly 1kloc of code without changing the semantics. Prefer syntactically-significant whitespace for some reason? You can do that in a compiler too! (Moonscript unfortunately does add a bunch of new semantics like the class system, which is a huge misfeature IMO, but it’s readily within the grasp of one person to create a moonscript-lite that’s just syntactic.)

              3. 2

                The first two links in “can be made” are the same. Was that intentional?

                1. 2

                  Nope, sorry! The second one should have been: https://github.com/komerdoor/nim-embedded-nimscript. Thanks for asking!

                2.  

                  I too use Lua, but at work, it’s more for LPEG (Lua Parser Expression Grammar). It takes a while to get used to it, but I find it much more expressive and powerful than the Lua patterns (or even regex). Not only can an expression be reused as part of another expression, but the resulting code is its own VM (distinct from Lua) that is geared directly for parsing.

                1. 4

                  I think there are places for both types of designers. If software only ever works within what is easily expressed by a given platform, then we would never push the limits of what can be done.

                  On the other hand, it pays to understand the limitations of your medium. Thing is, I don’t think that any one person has a good understanding of all the limitations of HTML. It’s ultimately a bizzare toolkit for applications and visual interactions, due to not having originally been built for them. I’ve web development (mostly back end/full stack) and I wouldn’t have known about the difficulty of the CSS Grid borders until I’d either tried to implement them, or had read this article.

                  1. 1

                    I think it could be fun.

                    1. 4

                      This reminds me of the interview question “what happens when you type example.com into the url bar and hit enter?” I’m not sure if that question is brilliant or terrible. I guess interviewing is hard..

                      1. 4

                        I personally suspect (though I have no evidence at the moment), that it’s most effective as a fun way to get certain types of programmers to geek out about all the different levels of detail they know about all the related topics.

                        I doubt it performs well as a predictor of how well a person will perform at a company. I don’t recall offhand what sorts of things do predict that well, but trivia did not rank high on the list.

                        1. 3

                          It’s brilliant for systems of devops roles because it’s a fantastic way to gauge technical depth.

                          Did they mention TCP/IP and routing in their answer? HTTP/HTTPS? DNS? server side programming and page rendering? Cookies and javascript? It’s endless.

                        1. 10

                          The only thing I’d add to this article is that I would highly appreciate it if affliate links were called out as such, akin to FCC rules for sponsorship (as unevenly applied as they are at times)

                          Not because I want to avoid using them, but so that I can use them in an informed fashion.

                          1. 3

                            Agreed. Its important to know if the author is recommending something because they like it or because they are paid to recommend it.

                            1. 0

                              I disagree. 100% of the things I recommend I do so wholeheartedly and genuinely. If I provide a link for convenience, there’s literally no downside to providing an affiliate link. I didn’t do it for money, but free money is nice.

                              Likewise, if I were to recommend things on my personal blog in this way, that recommendation would be completely genuine. @tlhunter isn’t exactly raking in the dough here, tens of dollars a month is hardly an incentive to shill random products.

                              1. 3

                                Don’t hear me saying that I think not calling out affiliate links is some great evil, just that I appreciate when the are called out, for two reasons: 1) It allows other people to find out about what affiliate links are and 2) It makes the business relationship between me and the author more clear. This is not a bad thing! As a professional, I want to support my profession, and other professions. If neither of those reasons appeal to you, then go about your day.

                                Also, while you and @tlhunter might not make a great deal on affiliate links, there certainly exist bloggers and writers who could make a lot with them. Daring Fireball or Coding Horror come to mind as possible examples in the technology sphere.

                                All that to say that I’m in favor of promoting more transparency when money is involved. There are certainly far greater evils on the internet. If you feel that calling out affiliate links would be too tacky for your style of writing, so be it.

                                1. 2

                                  I disagree. 100% of the things I recommend I do so wholeheartedly and genuinely. If I provide a link for convenience, there’s literally no downside to providing an affiliate link. I didn’t do it for money, but free money is nice.

                                  Not calling out that you make money from an affiliate recommendation is just as dishonest as giving a fake recommendation, IMO.

                                  A recommendation can be both genuine and paid for.

                            1. 6

                              I’ve been working on my journal software a lot over the holiday, and have been using it to track various things, like diet and reciepts. I’ve also been using it to track my creative ideas. In the past week, I’ve been refining the facilities exposed to the lua scripting that I integrated into this software the week before.

                              This week, I plan on building some basic web-based tools with it, like a small shopping list page, and an agenda mode that allows me to see what I’ve marked as TODOs for each given day in a week, so I know if I need to move things around.

                              I have also started working on tracking and classifying my expenses better, in an attempt to work on better saving my money. So far, that’s a work in progress python script over a CSV of financial activity from my bank.

                              There are other ideas I have in mind for this week, but those are the main 2 that I know I’ll be working on for sure. And, since I’ve following this set of emails, I’ve started to try to embrace making the decisions to embrace working on only a few things, rather than spending my time dreaming of all the things I could do.

                              1. 2

                                Ooh, those Creative Compass essays go well with Jon Acuff’s “Finish” (that I just started reading). Perfectionism is such a huge issue for me.

                                1. 1

                                  I’d be interested to see what you think when you finish that book (no pun intended). The one thing about Growing Gills that’s been a bit of a difficult thing for me, at least without someone else to go through it with, is that it’s more of a workbook than a “read this and just get ideas” book. That being said, the emails that I’ve been signing up for along-side it have been good, and I think once I get to a certain place (I’m currently addressing other issues in my life outside of creative output), it may be a valuable tool.

                              1. 4

                                I started a thread on journaling a while ago. I got some great recommendations from it!

                                I’m curious as to how many folks put their notes directly in to git commits and then actually later reference those notes.

                                1. 2

                                  I sometimes do this, and I find — at least for me — commit messages are the best place for me to take notes. They’re easily greppable, and accessible from any computer in the world. Also I write with a pen like a four year old, and I get impatient with how long it takes to get my thoughts out with a pen, and my hand starts to hurt.

                                  It’s also really nice having the notes together with the diff. This gives you some scope metadata like exactly what code the notes apply to, and when this commentary was valid/relevant. This is something that comments in code do not achieve.

                                  1. 1

                                    Commit messages are a good place, but not ideal for planning - I use a “developer’s readme” for that. What I would like in git (I use git) is a way to write in notes for a branch - when I create a branch I would like to have a notes field that I can use to outline what the purpose of the branch is.

                                    1. 2

                                      Git does let you save locally-stored branch descriptions: Branch descriptions in Git

                                      1. 1

                                        Thanks! That’s cool. Sad that it is local only. It’s only one extra text field in the branch metadata.

                                  2. 1

                                    I currently keep my notes in a SQLite database with a web front end. Mostly so that I have an easy way to search them without having to deal with Git’s structure. That also makes easier to access from a cell phone, which is a big plus when I’m using the note system for things like tracking spending.

                                  1. 2

                                    I’ve recently discovered how powerful keeping a journal can be. I built a small bit of software at work for it, so that I could use it to keep from having far too many files open in SSMS. It’s turned out to be a fairly powerful tool for helping me focus when I’m working on larger problems.

                                    For me, there were 3 components that were helpful: Having a persistent scratchpad for current context, having a super easy way to capture down thoughts, and having search-driven note lists, so that I can focus on a certain topic without having to see all the notes I’ve recently written.

                                    1. 2

                                      I don’t have a giant reading list at the moment, but I’m currently working through two books of note:

                                      Development and Demployment of Multiplayer Online Games Volume 1. This is the physical printing of the MMO material at ithare.com. It’s been a good read so far, it aims to be a distillation of industry wisdom on building multiplayer games at scale. I plan on picking up the rest of the series as it comes out over the coming years.

                                      The Craft of Research, by Booth, Columb and Williams. I’ve never gotten the place where I’ve felt comfortable writing a research paper on a topic that I’m not intimately familiar with. I’d like to work on that this year. Of course, writing always gets uncomfortable, but I want to have a better sense of the process, winding as it can be.

                                      I’m also going to be working through the Discwold novels throughout the year. So far I’ve read Thud! and most of Guards, Guards!. Thud!, in particular, seems like it’d make a really good movie, in the hands of the right editor, and was a powerful story in general.

                                      As far as recommendations go, I highly recommend finding a copy of Life in Code: A personal History of Technology, by Ellen Ullman. I haven’t finished it yet, but the opening third is quite an interesting reflection on the culture of software development. For me, it goes up there with Soul of a New Machine, and Coders at Work as a

                                      1. 1

                                        Wrt Discworld, I find the Moist von Lipwig books the best. Going Postal has already been made into a movie.

                                        I don’t find the Discworld movies very good. Maybe an animated movie would work better for me.

                                        A close second character is Tiffany Aching and the witches. The first book was hard to get into but it then she is awesome.

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                                        Honestly, the tool I’ve seen come closest to this list of requirements is TFS, rebranded as Azure Dev Ops. It has a lot of estimation tools, code artifacts can be linked to issued, it has a competent git hosting platform with Pull Requests, and so on.

                                        1. 1

                                          I second this, TFS is amazing.

                                        1. 2

                                          One thing that I’ve struggled with for a good portion of my life is mental distraction, and in 2018 a decent chunk of my side-project work has been dedicated to chasing one avenue for helping with that: Writing things down so I don’t have to keep them in short term memory, clearing my mind and mental space, so that I can work effectively instead of with a great deal of distraction

                                          That started in 2017 with an ideas.txt file on a server, which in early 2018 was turned into a pretty crude “here are all the ideas I have” site, which has an instance at https://ideas.junglecoder.com.

                                          A few months ago, in an effort to be able to clean up the dreck of SQL queries that got collected in SSMS, I wrote a rather simple desktop journal system that had 3 components:

                                          1. A timeline of editable notes
                                          2. A search based on LIKE ‘%@searchTerms%’, and an informal tagging system
                                          3. A scratchpad text field that is persisted between program opens.

                                          The combination of being limit the notes I’d seen to a particular topic, being able to keep daily tabs on the scratchpad, and being able to very easily record thoughts that I wanted to revisit later (but not now), helped me focus a lot more than I had previously been able to.

                                          Over the holidays, I’ve been building a web version of the same sort of process, with a focus on making it easy to capture ideas and/or other bits of information I want to track. After the holidays, I plan on building various bits of the program with an aim of being able to track progress along various goals I have.

                                          I had been wanting to learn F# more recently, but ended up going with Go for this journal program, because I knew I’d hit less roadblocks with using Go for this..

                                          In 2019, I plan on investigating at least a couple things:

                                          1. How to use this journal for helping me achieve short and long term goals (such as budgeting and calorie counting).
                                          2. I plan on learning better how to do research, now that I seem to have a better system for organizing my thoughts.

                                          So, for me, I suppose I plan on trying to understand myself better, and learn technology as appropriate in helping out there, rather than my usual approach of learning technology because it looks interesting.

                                          1. 13

                                            Some great ideas here, but I wish the implementation weren’t so inextricably tied to Slack.

                                            1. 2

                                              For what it’s worth, I’ve been chasing a similar idea, though as a single user journaling system, rather than a team knowledge base.

                                              I’m trying to build low-friction means of recording ideas and things to remember with the ability to give them just enough structure (between searching and tagging) to make it easy to capture ideas and then process them later, when one has the attention for them.

                                            1. 4

                                              I’m @yumaikas@mastodon.social. I tend to have a technical focus on Mastodon, especially things to do with stack based languages.

                                              1. 1

                                                very cool. Like Factor or other FORTHs?

                                                1. 4

                                                  Yep. And one of my own, called PISC

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Neat! I sometimes wonder why stack based programming languages sort of got left behind by the main stream. Maybe the perception is that they were size / performance oriented and it’s not necessary in this era of 1TB onboard RAM caches in everything? :)

                                                    I’ll never forget the first time I played with the FORTH interpreter in the Sun boot monitor.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      I have some guesses. They forced everything to work like a stack for one. The highest-performance architectures didn’t. They had a mix of design styles. Even Intel/AMD build their stack operations on top of micro-architecture that’s more RISC-like. Math-heavy stuff was more about arrays and vectors, esp hardware acceleration. LISP, the most productive language, had different primitives (esp lists). The best languages for verification focused on expressions, whiles, and simple functions. Compilers finding SSA form, which is functional-like, to be beneficial might have had an effect.

                                                      All kinds of ecosystems (aka bandwagons) were going in a different direction. Going in same direction gave their benefits. Especially, compiler optimizations for C, Moore’s Law with EDA tools, and high compatibility with mainstream software (integration benefits). The main promoter of stack-only architectures, Chuck Moore, abstained from using most of that to focus on his own style (eg 18-bit, not 16 or 32) running his own software stack on old nodes (his limited EDA) all built ground up. As in, you’d have to accept both stack processors and Moore’s preferences which gave up desirable things. People learning about it through him probably didn’t want that tradeoff. I mean, if you know Moore’s Law, why wouldn’t you want a supplier to run his Forth CPU’s through an optimized process at latest nodes? So, that was that with him continuing to do niche work, like energy-efficient embedded, using his methods. Mainly GreenArrays.

                                                      However, people who learn and keep the advantages of his work combining them with modern ideas in interpreters, compilers, and EDA might achieve some great results. Who knows… I encourage that experimentation.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        I think, more than anything, is that stack languages are so easy to start implementing that it’s easier to build your own than to use an existing one. If anything, it’s like the Lisp curse, but more so.

                                                        Postfix-style is also a really alien syntax for most current programmers, and has just enough of a learning curve that most people file it under “probably not worth the time”.

                                                        Also, many stack based languages make it easy to accidentally blow the stack, and otherwise tend towards being very fiddly.

                                                        Still, there are quite a few, such as 8th, Factor and PostScript, that tread a different route. Overall, I think stack based languages are here to stay, but will stay niche pretty much indefinitely.

                                                1. 8

                                                  the problem with css as a language is that it does not make conceptually simple things simple. particularly when it comes to the sort of neat, grid-based layout that app developers are used to from using frameworks like gtk, qt, windows forms, etc.

                                                  if i can sketch a layout in a few minutes on a piece of paper, it should not take days of fighting with css to get it to work right, even if i (admittedly) don’t have much experience in front end development; there is no other UI library, toolkit or framework that i found so hard to get to grips with.

                                                  1. 12

                                                    I’d argue that when using windows forms, qt, wpf, etc I find myself stifled by lack of freedom whenever I try to make an interface of any sort of complexity. Usually it takes a few lines of CSS (especially with modern CSS features like grid and flex) to get most layouts set up, where in native application frameworks, doing things like trying to style all buttons the same color are frustratingly difficult. In some things like windows forms, it’s practically impossible to style components as a group instead of individually.

                                                    I don’t think this is a problem with CSS as it exists today, though the argument may have been valid 10 years ago.

                                                    1. 10

                                                      I think this arises from a fundamental difference between UI philosophies.

                                                      In web applications, your design should represent your unique brand. Buttons shouldn’t be buttons, but should be your buttons.

                                                      In client apps, consistency is key, so all buttons should be the OS-standard buttons.

                                                      The problem becomes, who is in control of their experience? My current desktop environment is light text on a dark background. Any website I load is apparently free to override this. I have to leverage browser extensions to trick websites into looking the way I want them to look. Worse- because my desktop foreground color is light, and my desktop background color is dark, I’m playing a game of roulette with websites. Some of them change the foreground text color, others change the background color, but many don’t change both, which means I’m left with dark-on-dark or light-on-light text.

                                                      The fundamental unit of control should be the end user, not the designer. I should decide what a button looks like, and if I delegate that responsibility to another piece of software, it should be my OS/DE first. The worst thing about the web is the idea that each website needs to look their own way. Fuck your website. Buttons should always look like buttons. Text fields should always look like text fields. The font I set as my default font should be the only font that displays text for readability (feel free to use bullshit fonts for shit I don’t care about, like logos or ads, bullshit deserves bullshit).

                                                      Users should be the owners of their experience. Always and forever. And yes, I do override your CSS. All the time.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        You mean with firvor that the content should be bundled rather than the content + the style + the platform ?

                                                        I agree that extracting the actual content out of the website is getting challenging…

                                                        No, I do not want to subscribe, just the text. No I wish to not send you cookies tokens. Oh, sub-sub menu to disable them, let’s do them all. Now what ? Ad blocking does not work ? Oh right, self promotion from publisher… And I can’t read with these 3em quotes all over the article.

                                                        sight Do you serve the article as FTP or Gopher ? Hehe, no of course.

                                                        Ah text browser does not even load the page, content loads through JavaScript.

                                                        Ok, let’s stick to the website.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          And on publishing side: I may have lost 500~1000 words texts due to the session I was logged in timed out, this about a 50 times.

                                                      2. 4

                                                        Let’s not forget the stack that lies below: it just takes a few lines of CSS and a zillion of lines of code in the web browser. Chromium has more lines of code than FreeBSD, OpenBSD, DragonflyBSD and NetBSD altogether for instance.

                                                      3. 6

                                                        Yeah the native app toolkits rend to work on a “place things on a grid” strategy, whereas CSS is much more about “flowing the content according to the viewport”

                                                        It was definitely the right choice in the end given smartphones becoming people’s main browsing devices, but it’s unlike what a lot o programmers were used to.

                                                        I think once you think about the box model deeply, and stop trying to place things at certain parts of the screen, you can reach acceptance of the system more quickly.

                                                        This post on CSS positioning was a huge eye opener for me in this regard. Stuff goes where it goes

                                                        1. 5

                                                          Hmm often when conceptually simple things aren’t simple it may be because it’s not as simple as it appears. I use Bulma.io for css, and it’s pretty light as far as frameworks go, and gives me some sane defaults, but if I were actually a front end developer I can see where I would use less and less of the provided classes.

                                                          1. 3

                                                            So, depending on what level of browser support you’re willing to work with, CSS grid is rather good at doing that sort of grid-based layout you speak of. At least at the basic levels where I have experience with it.

                                                            If you’ve never used it, it is very worth a look

                                                            1. 1

                                                              thanks, i’ll give it a try. this is what i ended up with using flex (which i thought was the way to go, but was way fiddlier than i expected)

                                                              1. 2

                                                                Flex is good for when you want things to flow in one dimension (with the possibility of wrapping to “fake” a second dimension) but don’t care about the exact sizes. For instance, a bunch of text blobs that you want to sit next to each other and spread out to take up the available space.

                                                                For actual grid stuff though, you should use CSS grid, which allows you to place elements in a 2 dimensional grid and give them exact sizes.

                                                                Both features have their uses cases, but neither is a complete solution in and of themselves.

                                                                Here are some good articles on the use cases for each:

                                                                Also here’s a comprehensive guide to using CSS Grid: https://css-tricks.com/snippets/css/complete-guide-grid/

                                                            2. 2

                                                              Personally I’d take CSS over WPF or Winforms any day. CSS certainly has its annoyances, but I found it far less annoying to work with for anything nontrivial.

                                                            1. 5

                                                              Mostly going to be doing Thanksgiving things this week.

                                                              Last night I got another chunk of porting done on my F# port of the Erlang wiki behind idea.junglecoder.com. I’ve noticed that A) The F# compiler is making it easier for things to be basically correct (though some of the errors are a bit strange at times) and B) I don’t have to roll my own versions of things nearly as much in F# as I was in Erlang. I’m hoping that the overall effect of that will help reduce the activation energy to add some features (like a means of managing lists, or being able to have a better markdown parser).

                                                              1. 8

                                                                $work:

                                                                • finishing a symbolic execution engine for a client’s custom programming language; need to add more primitives, and add my computation traces to an actual SMT.
                                                                • assessment work
                                                                • writing some templates for our findings, some sales engineering and client meetings
                                                                • Talk on blockchain security

                                                                !$work:

                                                                • finally finishing pattern matching in carML
                                                                • adding some more threat hunting items to wolf-lord
                                                                1. 2

                                                                  How did your client end up with a custom programming language?

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    believe it or not, it’s surprisingly common in the blockchain space, esp wrt validator languages for proof of authority, as well as for “novel” smart contract languages.

                                                                1. 5

                                                                  Sounds like decent stuff but I do find it amusing that some really basic things are getting big headlines: “Notepad Supports Linux Line Endings” and “Copy/Paste Arrives for Linux/WSL Consoles”.

                                                                  I’m hoping the console improvements are actually useful since the worst part about the WSL (aside from I/O performance) are the really poor consoles in Windows, including current 3rd party offerings.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    I actually did get excited about a couple of those. Which I guess just illustrates how low the bar was to begin with!

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      including current 3rd party offerings

                                                                      ConEmu is pretty good. The only problem I’ve noticed is that it likes to put the cursor one line above (than the actual prompt line) in my zsh prompt :D

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        ConEmu is an ok console, but it’s a poor Terminal Emulator, in my experience. (In part due to lag and some minor issues when processing VT-100 codes).

                                                                        If you don’t use Vim or co, it seems to do quite servicably

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          I used it for neovim in tmux, haven’t noticed any problems (though it’s not very fast indeed)

                                                                        2. 1

                                                                          UPD: another issue: in ConEmu, paste doesn’t work inside tmux. Switched to wsltty (mintty) :)

                                                                        3. 1

                                                                          The user, of course doesn’t (shouldn’t) care about how hard something was to implement, but the people writing these release notes are biased by that sometimes, it’s only normal. The LF change must’ve been a ton of work. Most of it probably not coding, but still work.

                                                                          I don’t know it for a fact, it’s just speculation based on experience. By the way, I work at Microsoft though nowhere near notepad.exe.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Yup. it’s amusing, but sadly it’s a Thing. I adopted WSL here at work because for some kinds of access it’s Windows or the hiighway and WSL is a LOT better than being stuck in CMD.EXE/ Powershell.

                                                                            Thing is the cut&past experience at least before these changes was AWFUL. I’m embarrassed to admit that our workflow involves a LOT of cut&paste, and the experience was abysmal.

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                                                                              The Notepad update was quite interesting considering it took 33 years for that basic feature to finally be there. No more opening config files and seeing nothing but a very long single line.

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                                                                              My two cents: find a way to make remote work maintainable for you.

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                                                                                Agreed.

                                                                                I’ve looked at coworking spaces, but finaicially it’s not a possibility right now. The company also will not reimburse for it.

                                                                                They might change their tune if they knew that not having a coworking space is making you consider leaving the company. If you can make it clear that this is a requirement for your job and the alternative is hiring someone else, then in most cases they will pay for it.

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                                                                                  I’ve never really considered this way of thinking.

                                                                                  I would assume most companies would just view you as dead weight or an extra cost (why give this remote worker money to co-work when I am saving money by not having them in the office)

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                                                                                    It depends on how replaceable you are of course, but the cost of training a replacement for many folks who write and operate software is very high, so people are incentivized to avoid that kind of disruption.

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                                                                                      I agree completely! I suppose I’m just jaded from previous jobs where most people had left until it was only contractors left (no full time employees left)

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                                                                                  is that because you think the startup opportunity is too good to walk away from? or remote work is too good to walk away from? or a combo?

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                                                                                    I’m not /u/zpojqwfejwfhiunz, but I agree with him on this.

                                                                                    Being remote gives you a lot of flexibilty, and there are quite a few ways to work outside of the house that don’t have to involve being in a co-working space, such as coffee shops or parks. This may not work as well on meeting days, but it is worth investigating. Also, if you’ve not been taking advantage of working remotely, maybe start trying to get creative about flexing those privileges.

                                                                                    Does your current company pay for you to visit them once in a while? Are you living with anyone? Can you have pets in your current housing? Do you have regular social contact with people that will help you grow? I know for me, working remote allowed me to move closer to family and friends I hadn’t seen in a long time, which did far more to attack the problem of lonliness than working in an office did. I moved 1300 miles to pull that off. Perhaps that sort of move might make sense for you?

                                                                                    I would attack the lonliness angle from outside of work before I would switch to working at a local company, and I’d do a lot of research on the local company before I switched. Maybe make a friend or acquaintance there via a shared social gathering, or the like, and get a sense of what the company politics are like, or if people there like the company culture. It sounds like you have great co-workers, that’s not something to be set aside lightly.

                                                                                    In other words, take advantage of working remotely to be able to surround yourself with people that will build you up. If you can’t figure out a way to make that work (and you have been working remotely for 4 years, so that seems quite possible), then I’d consider working in an office, but not before.

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                                                                                      such as coffee shops or parks

                                                                                      …and libraries!

                                                                                      Libraries are so undervalued it’s unreal. I’ve been working remotely for the past 4/5 years, and while I do sometimes work from cafés, there is an implicit social pressure to keep buying things to justify taking up a table. No such problem with a library. If you’re in a big city, these can be incredibly beautiful buildings too.

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                                                                                        Thats such an amazing idea. If I go remote this would be my main place to work at. Its such a nice building but I rarely have a reason to go there.

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                                                                                          Thats such an amazing idea. If I go remote this would be my main place to work at. Its such a nice building but I rarely have a reason to go there.

                                                                                          It’s cool, I’ve tried it - only downside is private rooms for calls are not always around.

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                                                                                        thanks for the well thought out reply!

                                                                                        • certainly going to attempt working outside a bit more
                                                                                        • social contact with others seems to be a common thread, not currently doing much of that
                                                                                        • approaching the local company from the inside makes a lot of sense
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                                                                                          Yeah, when you’re working remotely, being able to fill your social needs outside of work is key.

                                                                                          In some ways, you could view it as an advantage of working remote. After all, you don’t have a commute, that frees up some of that time to be spent elsewhere. Be intentional about spending it elsewhere.

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                                                                                            Along these lines, I personally find that limiting media consumption is critical. It’s better to force yourself to be bored than to always have the TV on or be staring at a screen. That boredom will force you to find other hobbies. Ideally, you’d find at least one athletic hobby, and at least one social hobby.

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                                                                                    At work, I’m working on tickets/maintenace this week, trying to get caught up as tickets have been piling up a little bit.

                                                                                    At home, trying to catch up on cleaning and making my office/workspace set up for doing both personal and professional work, so that I can easily spend some time on side-projects without a lot of hassle. Once I get the office set up better, I plan on working on various small web-toys/utilities in F#/.NET Core/SQLite. I have mostly ideas here, not actual implementations, more details to come as they are built out.

                                                                                    I’ve also started the Strong Lifts weight training program, trying to get stronger and/or build up various types of body strength.