Threads for zenlot

  1. 3

    Miniflux is amazing. Best RSS reader you can find. I host it on Nvidia Jetson with PostgreSQL database, never had problems with it.

    1. 1

      I’ve always been puzzled why they’re still publishing the site on HTTP vs HTTPS? Just add certs, so we won’t have annoying browser messages. It’s 2021.

      EDIT: http://docwiki.embarcadero.com/RADStudio/Sydney/en/Delphi’s_Object_Pascal_Style_Guide

      1. 1

        What kind of annoying browser messages are you talking about? Firefox shows a padlock with a red line over it in the address bar, which is extremely simple to ignore.

        If you configure your browser to be more strict, it’s hardly the website’s fault for you getting annoyed by its warnings.

        1. -4

          My problem that in 2021 big enterprise did not manage to setup SSL certs on their site? Not sure if you’re idiot or ignorant?

          1. 2

            Please try to make your point without descending into ad hominem attacks.

            1. -2

              Please, do not comment if you don’t have anything to add to the discussion.

              1. 2

                No problem, I’ll just flag your unkind comments in the future without leaving a reply!

                1. 1

                  Makes sense.

        2. 1

          Sites I run across regularly that don’t use HTTPS:

        1. 3

          If anyone wants to play around with SGX on Vultr(applicable on many other providers too), I have a short intro for environment setup here.

          1. 3

            We’re living in an age where dark mode is becoming a must. Soon a switch for on/off will be present pretty much everyhere. It reminds me a transition of the web to HTTPS.

            1. 3

              Dark mode is an aesthetic choice. Many people seem to love it; some hate it. The arguments that it’s objectively better or reduces eye strain are pretty suspect, IMHO. My objective experience is that it exacerbates my (normally mild) astigmatism by making the pupils open wider, which reduces depth of field. The only time I find it useful is when reading in bed after light-out to avoid disturbing my partner.

              Modern browsers have a way for pages to detect whether dark mode is enabled in the OS, right? Can’t lobste.rs use that?

              1. 4

                If you’re worried about eye strain, just dial back the brightness. It always amazes me how we collectively make things harder by trying to make things easier and prettier:

                • Old way: monitors have physical brightness and contrast knobs. New way: buttons are ugly and we need a ton of other controls that no-one uses, so we hide everything behind invisible buttons and menus that are hard to operate. Result: it is a hassle to adjust the most basic things on a screen and no-one knows hoe to do it anymore.
                • Old way: let’s define only the structure of the document and let everyone display it the way they want. New way: we want pixel perfect control even though everyone has different pixels. Result: we need new layouts (or apps!) for every device and too bad if you don’t like the one we give you.

                If you look for it, you see this pattern everywhere.

              2. 2

                Dark mode a must? Dark mode is basically the computer nerd equivalent of “this seasons in color is pink” in fashion, its at best stylistic. https has technical reasons to exist, dark mode is “lets use different colors to display things, just in dark cause that’s the new fashion”. I’m not sure they’re even close to similar. One is simply color themes.

                1. 2

                  You’ve misunderstood my comment. I am not comparing “dark mode” vs “https” technical implementation, just a similar trend happening in web.

                2. 1

                  I’m curious, what do folks use a dark mode for? A few apps have started defaulting to inverted brightness and it’s sometimes attractive, but I haven’t found a personal use case.

                  1. 1

                    I like how it looks better, and often turn on dark mode for various programs I use if available. It’s not super important to me - I didn’t mind that lobsters didn’t have it, for instance.

                1. 1

                  Google Docs works fine for this purpose.

                  1. 21

                    Longer than the last few days: https://lobste.rs/s/wdjrcd/tags_flags

                    I’ve revamped the comment flagging UI to further emphasize that they’re for alerting mods when a user doesn’t want to engage and curb their abuse for punishing disagreement. Visually, flagging comments now looks like flagging stories with a text link rather than an down-pointing arrow, and flagging a comment collapses the tree. Nothing on the site refers to “downvoting” any more.

                    Also, our source code is available for answering these questions.

                    1. 5

                      Hm I also missed this…

                      I don’t quite understand the rationale: doesn’t removing downvoting encourage flagging? But flagging is only for when mods should get involved?

                      I thought it made sense to have downvoting mean “I want to see less or I disagree, but mods shouldn’t get involved”. i.e. it’s not against the rules, but not desired either

                      The classic example is the genre of posts that is “my programming language preferences presented as fact”, which invariably attract a ton of comments, mostly angry ones, and they mostly make the site worse IMO. I don’t flag those since it’s not against the rules per se, but I feel like they deserve a downvote, to avoid generating repetitive and unnecessary discussions

                      I “hide” most of those now, but occasionally get sucked in … Do hides factor into placement?

                      1. 12

                        I thought it made sense to have downvoting mean “I want to see less or I disagree, but mods shouldn’t get involved”. i.e. it’s not against the rules, but not desired either

                        Personally I think downvoting to express disagreement isn’t the right approach. It doesn’t communicate the substance of disagreement. A comment indicating the reason for that disagreement is feedback to the original poster, and the community can use upvotes to communicate agreement with either view.

                        I really liked the old OSnews approach to this, where in order to downvote, a user had to choose between “spam”, “offtopic”, or “inaccurate.” It really made me stop and think quite a few times, “is this objectively wrong or against my subjective opinion?” Hiding content from the community based on my subjective view doesn’t seem helpful, but if a post is likely misleading people to the point where they’re better off not reading it, then a downvote makes sense.

                        1. 2

                          I very much agree with your first paragraph - that’s what I intensely dislike about the beige site. Was that person’s comment downvoted because it’s technically incorrect? Disagreement? Misunderstanding? Different sense of humour? It’s a conversation killer.

                          1. 1

                            But isn’t that exactly what lobste.rs had? When you downvote, you choose why.

                            That was an explicit and intentional difference between lobste.rs and HN as far as I remember.

                          2. 6

                            Twitter has the concept of “ratio” - content that gets lots of comments and few upvotes is assumed to be generating negative comments, and gets ranked lower.

                          3. 4

                            they’re for alerting mods when a user doesn’t want to engage and curb their abuse for punishing disagreement

                            Fantastic! This has long been a complaint of mine here and on other sites, and I’m sorry I missed the original announcement.

                            1. 3

                              Greatly appreciate it. HN suffers from this, where replies are being tailored and tailored not to receive upvotes, but not to receive downvotes. Everyone’s opinion matters as long as it’s polite and should not be downvoted by some “elitist commenters” on a forum, just because the opinion is different.

                            1. 37

                              I wrote Miniflux 7 years ago for my own needs. Rewritten in Golang in 2017. The project still active and continue to receive contributions. There is always something to improve :)

                              1. 5

                                I like this but managing the database myself isn’t ideal. Any reason why an embedded database isn’t used?

                                1. 3

                                  Miniflux is excellent! No BS, clean and snappy interface.

                                  I’m using it for my project that automatically searches for certain queires on github/hackernews/twitter/reddit/pinboard and puts the results in atom feeds. Kinda like Google Alerts, but actually useful and consumed through a functional RSS interface. I needed to slightly modify the Miniflux frontend for that (making it even more compact) – and it was pleasantly quick and clear (I had no prior Go experience either).

                                  Thanks for your work!

                                  1. 1

                                    I was looking for something exactly like this!

                                    1. 1

                                      I have started using it yesterday. Moved away from Innoreader, mainly because I wanted to own the data and not worry about it in future, specifically manage starred articles etc… Miniflux is extremely easy to setup, especially if you’re using docker. I always run Postgres instances anyways, so it integrated well. For people who question db, it’s an advantage having a database like PostgreSQL. And I like that it’s ‘opinionated’ - tech stack and implementation perfectly considered. @0xfg - many many thanks for your work on this.

                                      1. 1

                                        Hey man, I’ve been using Miniflux for years. Thanks for the awesome work! I really got excited when you rewrote it in Go :)

                                        Eventually I switched to FreshRSS because I can choose a SQLite database there. Together with docker/kubernetes this makes the setup slim and easy. I miss Miniflux’s straightforward user-interface, though.

                                      1. 4

                                        Always fascinated seeing articles like this and how much work and effort someone puts into it. You can learn a lot by just looking at the thought process.

                                        1. 7

                                          I’ve been using them for a while to do all of our docker builds. For public projects it’s free and it’s great if you want to run your agent on premises. CI/CD pipelines setup is easy, web console is nice and itegrates well with slack. Highly recommend them.

                                          1. 1

                                            I’ve never used Nix. What can lorri offer that I can relate to? Replacing docker as a provider of a build environment for a specific project?

                                            1. 2

                                              I wouldn’t recommend lorri for a new person. But plain nix is a build tool, package manager, provider of build environments, and a deployment tool all in one. In my opinion it is better than docker for many reasons.

                                              1. 1

                                                Could you elaborate how it compares, how it’s better and what are advantages over Docker?

                                                PS: haven’t used Nix yet.

                                                1. 2
                                                  • Packages do not need to run inside a container, but all of dockers benefits.
                                                  • Can specify exact git hash of nixpkgs respository so all dependencies are versioned precisely.
                                                  • Can also build docker images, so interops well with docker.
                                                  • Has more uses the more experienced you get with it.
                                                  • Can be used as your daily operating system package manager, less tools to remember overall.
                                            1. 14

                                              I usually expose -x via a flags like --trace/--debug. You can also invoke it manually with bash -x ze_script. I wouldn’t turn it on by default.

                                              1. 2

                                                I definitely agree. I think it’s tempting to think trace output like this means you don’t have to work on log messages and error messages for human beings, and the result is a giant wall of pretty inscrutable output to sift through to sort out what went wrong.

                                                1. 2

                                                  -x is really useful when writing Dockerfiles, so you can do:

                                                  RUN set -x \
                                                      && my-command \
                                                      && my-2nd-command
                                                  

                                                  This way you get clear picture of what’s happening while doing image builds.

                                                  EDIT: formatting

                                                1. 2

                                                  If you like Racket and love chess, these are probably one of the most detailed series.

                                                  There’s also part 3: https://alex-hhh.github.io/2018/10/chess-game-using-racket-s-pasteboard-part-3.html

                                                  And if missed part 1: https://alex-hhh.github.io/2018/10/chess-game-using-racket-s-pasteboard.html

                                                  1. 7

                                                    I’ve used OpenVPN for years, but the whole setup and maintenance process looks outdated. Recently started using Wireguard[1] in production which is quick to set up and hardly requires any maintenance. It also works well in containerized world.

                                                    [1] - https://www.wireguard.com

                                                    1. 3

                                                      Unfortunately there’s not yet kernel support for Wireguard, so maintenance is higher than it would be otherwise (e.g. dependence upon wireguard maintainer keeping out of tree module up to date for latest kernels, and you (or your distro) having to build it out of tree).

                                                      It seems like he’s close to getting it merged though, so I’m holding out for that!

                                                      1. 4

                                                        wireguard-go might also be usable, if maximum performance is not required. I wouldn’t think it would be any slower than openvpn, which is also user-space.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Most distributions provide a kernel module since years. The burden of maintaining such a tiny piece of code is moderate and it does not impact admin and end users.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Maybe in this one specific case, but I’ve been burned in the past by relying on an out of tree module (or set of patches), only to have the developer lose interest, sell out, whatever. (e.g. grsec). It’s rare I suppose, but the burden on users and admins is high when it does happen.

                                                            (the same fate could happen to patches/modules in the tree, but it’s much more rare)

                                                        2. 1

                                                          I do not think you can compare now Wireguard and OpenVPN in term of reliability. Wireguard is still something new, does not be audited by security team yet and does not have a strong maintainability process. A little quote from the authors:

                                                          As of June 2018 the developers of WireGuard advise treating the code and protocol as experimental, and caution that they have not yet achieved a stable release compatible with CVE tracking of any security vulnerabilities that may be discovered.[7][8]

                                                          1. 3

                                                            WireGuard has received formal verification from the developers [1], audited by [2], and reviewed by kernel developers and distributions that ship the kernel module. I don’t have numbers on the number of reviewers versus SLOC count but I suspect it could be much higher than OpenVPN given the size of WireGuard

                                                            [1] https://www.wireguard.com/papers/wireguard-formal-verification.pdf

                                                            [2] https://courses.csail.mit.edu/6.857/2018/project/He-Xu-Xu-WireGuard.pdf

                                                            1. 2

                                                              They’re saying that because they’re trustworthy, security folks. We always advise to say don’t trust it until proven otherwise with strong review and/or verification. There’s been some impressive results in verifying Wireguard on top of the fact that it’s so much smaller than competing implementations.

                                                              For now, I’ll just give you this article for some nice comparisons. Also, that article says OpenVPN is about 600,000 lines of code. The most-secure systems were thousands to tens of thousands of lines of code because smaller systems are easier to bulletproof. I don’t need to look at OpenVPN’s security advisories to know it will have more errors with more complexity.