1. 1

    I fail to see the use for Go for non-enterprise projects. It doesn’t seem to offer anything interesting compared to languages I already know (like C) apart from goroutines. I would love to be proved otherwise, though.

    1. 11

      I like using go for (personal) server applications, because it has a comprehensive and well-designed standard library, that generate static binaries that can be easily copied around. With the new embed directive, this should make it even easier. I think Go doesn’t want to be interesting, it wants to be convenient, and that is certainly something it manages.

      1. 4

        I love to use Go for personal projects because it costs nothing to host it. I am talking about resources consumption. It fits on many “free plan” VMs, where Java would not.

      2. 1

        Personally, I just find it easy to write and understand and plus I enjoy the syntax.
        When most people have a rough idea of something they want to make they do up a prototype in Python, but I usually do the same in Go just because I enjoy writing it.

        1. 1

          Compared to C for private and non enterprise projects Go offers:

          • No requirement for header files
          • Sometimes less verbosity
          • Nicer Errors
          • Faster build times

          While Go has good tooling C might still have more.

        1. 1

          I tried this with my old fav slrn but I do need something that handles HTML format

          https://imgur.com/a/OQXE42V

          1. 2

            You can configure slrn to run articles through html2text and a little s-lang, description at the bottom of the page here: https://feedbase.org/documentation/#slrn

            It isn’t super fast, but it looks pretty good: https://koldfront.dk/misc/lobstersslrn.png

            1. 1

              From the README, there are two groups:

              • lobsters - “Multipart HTML/Plain UTF-8 QP”, and
              • lobsters.plain - that is “Plain UTF-8 QP”

              Try out lobsters.plain I guess?

              1. 2

                I had recently added that. I’m tempted to turn .plain into ISO-8859-1 for the nasty legacy clients.

            1. 11

              That pretty well sums up why I just block it entirely. A favorite local web site moved from a normal wordpress comment system to disqus a few years back, and that bothered me enough to stop participating even though i’d enjoyed it for 6 or 7 years up to that point. Even in the beginning, disqus felt slimy. Since the acquisition by the surveillance tech firm: it’s a hard “No.”

              1. 1

                how do you go about blocking it?

                1. 4

                  I use the EFF’s privacy badger add-on.

                  1. 4

                    umatrix is the way to get back control on the Web

                    1. 3

                      Umatrix was one of my favourite extensions.
                      Too bad its repo has been “archived” now. Development has ceased.

                      1. 1

                        Still works pretty darn well for me, so it’s still my favourite 😊

                    2. 3

                      I blacklist it in my pihole install.

                  1. 2

                    Why not use Tor for this, which is a general and well-known solution?

                    1. 3

                      Lack of mobile clients, probably.

                      1. 3

                        In theory they could bundle a Tor client in Signal and send traffic through its SOCKS/HTTP proxy (definitely doable on Android).

                        But in practice it’d probably be hell.

                    1. 4

                      Typewriters are incredibly complex and precise piece of machinery. At their peak in the decades around World War II, we built them so well that, today, we don’t need to build any typewriters anymore.

                      Cool, now it’s time to find all the many typewriters to help me type in my native script. Oh wait a minute, they don’t really exist. This is also a great solution for CJK languages which have multiple scripts and large ideographic orthographies.

                      A heavier and well-designed object feels different. You don’t have it always with you just in case. You don’t throw it in your bag without thinking about it. It is not there to relieve you from your boredom. Instead, moving the object is a commitment. A conscious act that you need it. You feel it in your hands, you feel the weight. You are telling the object: « I need you. You have a purpose. »

                      Right, so I should tell my partner, who has a lot less upper body strength than I do, that she needs to carry a metal weight in her bag to help her feel connection with her writing device, and also give her back pain? Come on. Portability is a huge leveller. It helps folks ride around on bicycles or walk instead of driving with their goods. It helps women, who have less upper body strength, carry things around. It lets kids, the elderly, and anyone who has issues hauling things be enabled to use the device. This feels like an anti-accessibility measure to me.

                      Instead of being mass-produced in China, ForeverComputers could be built locally, from open source blueprints.

                      Nice we got some xenophobia here as well.

                      Geeks and programmers know the benefit of keyboard oriented workflows. They are efficient but hard to learn.

                      With the way my RSI is going, I’m really hoping we as a society can move away from keyboard oriented workflows, but okay. I’m glad our vision of the future only has people with full range of motion with their 10 digits as writers.


                      While I like some of the ideas here, I really want to question these choices that the author has made. Who actually wants to use these devices? Certainly not my parents, my partner, nor I. These are things that a certain subset of the software community values, but far from universal. There’s also a lot of implicit eurocentrism in the typewriter. Modern computers have dramatically increased the accessibility of reading and writing to folks with poor vision or dexterity, and we don’t remember the typewriters that did break or jam frequently. Let’s not throw away accessibility due to some nostalgia that a programmer has.

                      1. 5

                        Instead of being mass-produced in China, ForeverComputers could be built locally, from open source blueprints.

                        Nice we got some xenophobia here as well.

                        What’s wrong with localized production instead of long-distance mass-production in typical mass-producing-nations like China? His remark neither meant China specifically (but rather used it as a device), nor did it address the Chinese people but the nature of China’s economy. Or are you going to argue that China does not primarily focus on mass-production?

                        Apart from that, I agree with your statements.

                        1. 2

                          Because it’s naive if the point is about mass production and shipping. If you’re trying to argue that your device is made externally, then I’m pretty sure the entire thing is not assembled in China. The chip may have been fabricated in Taiwan (through TSMC), other electronic parts in China, with small parts from, say, Indonesia. Modern supply chains are complex, and assuming something comes solely from China feels disingenuous.

                          It would have been simpler to say “Instead of being assembled and shipped over large distances, ForeverComputers could be built locally”

                          1. 3

                            It may very well be naive, yes. But I still don’t see how it’s “Xenophobic” to say what they’ve said.

                            1. 1

                              Sure, I can go either way on it. I wasn’t inclined to give the piece the benefit of the doubt when the rest of it seemed so out of touch, but I can see it being both naivite/figure-of-speech or mild Xenophobia.

                      1. 1

                        Personally I don’t care for RSS, because I like the diversity in presentation and styling that different sites use. I like seeing a grid of thumbnails on Youtube, or a list of threads with vote/comment counts on Reddit. I’m sure it’s possible to get similar presentation if you hack on your own RSS reader, but at that point I’d basically be rewriting those sites and I don’t see any benefit in it.

                        That said, some sites can get really annoying to browse, especially on mobile. I like RSS for those sites.

                        1. 4

                          I get this. And I agree when we’re talking about smaller sites+blogs.
                          I just use RSS to keep up-to-date with said sites/blogs, and I usually view the actual articles in a browser.

                          1. 2

                            A lot of formerly popular feed readers only showed title+link and you read on-site anyway, if that’s your thing

                            1. 1

                              A good example of it is are news sites, or ad-heavy sites. LitHub is one I like to read the articles but the actual site is littered with ads and related content blocks. Getting the articles from the RSS feed strips all that out and makes it much easier to read.

                            1. 1

                              I think prefers-color-scheme is great.

                              I just wish it were easier to switch between light/dark mode in browsers for testing purposes (or just for the sake of it). Something like a toggle in developer settings.
                              I don’t like how it’s usually locked to the OS dark mode setting.

                              1. 4

                                All major desktop browsers have exactly that feature, see the post for links on how to activate it.

                                1. 1

                                  Wow thanks! Can’t believe I missed that.

                              1. 8

                                http://undeadly.org for anything OpenBSD-related

                                1. 4

                                  About Dragonfly, but actually covering all BSDs to some degree.

                                  https://www.dragonflydigest.com/

                                  1. 3

                                    The weekly bsd and then one day later the weekly “cool stuff from the internet” are one of the posts I look forward to everyone week!

                                    1. 1

                                      Absolutely. They manage to be the highlight from my tracked rss these days, quite often.

                                    2. 2

                                      I second this.

                                  1. 1

                                    I’ve always thought the idea of filtering the page content based on CSS selectors was quite brilliant.

                                    1. 13

                                      Most of the article recaps the fairly well known indexes as offsets argument. But this part at the end I’ve never heard before:

                                      What’s funny to think about is that if instead C had not done that and used 1-based indexing, people today would certainly be claiming how C is superior for providing both 1-based indexing with p[i] and 0-based pointer offsets with p + i.

                                      I wholeheartedly agree!

                                      1. 4

                                        The author forgets to mention that in C p[1] also dereferences the pointer. So it is equivalent to *(p + 1), not to p + 1. Using 1-based indexing for bracket notation would simultaneously assign two new concepts to one operator. I can see how that could have been an unfortunate choice.

                                        1. 1

                                          The author forgets to mention that in C p[1] also dereferences the pointer.

                                          I thought that was just implied. Nevertheless, you have a good point.

                                      1. 13

                                        Matrix is not decentralised. I suspect that if users jumped onto it like they are right now with Signal, they would head to one instance and we would experience the same issues.

                                        True decentralisation would be wonderful, but right now it’s not offering what a secure centralised service can, so I have to recommend Signal.

                                        1. 5

                                          I don’t see why users joining one server because it’s the default in the most common client makes a protocol centralized.

                                          1. 4

                                            I don’t see silo-to-silo communication as fully decentralised, which is why I said “not decentralised” instead of “centralised”. You are still beholden to a server and client model, where you have to trust the server.

                                            I completely agree with all the trust issues have people have with Signal, I think that for most people they don’t go away with matrix.

                                            1. 5

                                              Secure Scuttlebutt is perhaps closer to properly decentralized. There are servers (termed “pubs”), but any client can sync via any pub it has access to.

                                              Unfortunately, it’s quite hard on the CPU, and hard to write clients for.

                                              1. 1

                                                I like ssb but yeah to me it shows that we’re just not quite there yet.

                                              2. 5

                                                So what if 80% use the most common 2 servers (like with email)? There’s still the option of going elsewhere without burning all bridges:

                                                Everybody can (in principle) set up a server and still communicate with the rest. The hard part here is making that process simple enough that everybody does, but at least it’s possible. With Signal (or Whatsapp, Telegram, Threema) you don’t have that option.

                                                Also there’s work in Matrix-land to distribute the server function (see https://matrix.org/blog/2020/06/02/introducing-p-2-p-matrix/), so the federated system may not be the end of the road.

                                                There are other systems that provide a p2p experience now (such as SSB) but they’re even less mass-marketable than Matrix, and with communication systems, mass market appeal is, sadly, important.

                                                1. 5

                                                  How many bridges were burnt in the move from Whatsapp to Signal? The transition is almost completely seamless. If this is the benefit of federated systems, why would people care when moving between two different centralised services was this easy?

                                                  To be clear, I’m not happy with having one person run one server that controls everything. I just haven’t seen anything else that I could give to my non-techie friends and say ‘use this and you won’t notice the difference’. Maybe that’s coming, but for now we have Signal.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    How many bridges were burnt in the move from Whatsapp to Signal? The transition is almost completely seamless.

                                                    Except for those who went for Telegram, Threema or any other platform over Signal. They can either go to Signal too, or they’re cut off.

                                              3. 4

                                                It’s the duck test. “A protocol if walks/quacks like a centralised one if there exists some server that affects most of the chat groups yo’re in because at least one member of that group relies on that server.” Disagree if you want, set the threshold where you want, reword the test to be about your correspondents instead of groups, but that’s roughly the argument.

                                                1. 2

                                                  That “test” is not very useful: If your own server goes down, all chat groups you’re in are affected because you’re gone.

                                                  For a true peer to peer system with absolutely no coordinating node (no super nodes, no seed nodes, no query services, no NAT penetrating reflection services) I’d still argue that your own system is your server. And guess what: if that goes down, all your groups are affected because at least one of their members (you) relies on that server.

                                                2. 2

                                                  At the very least it makes us think about what it means for a protocol to be centralized or decentralized.

                                                  Protocols are super interesting, but the reason we discuss (de)centralization is generally due to issues of power and agency that people experience using technology. So I think to a lot of us the more important question is how the system itself - built on the network, implemented by the protocols - is centralized/federated/decentralized and how that impacts the people that interact with it.

                                                  The web is built on a whole stack of decentralized protocols developed in the open, but it’s also more centralized than its ever been.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    I’m not exactly fond of Matrix but I agree.

                                                1. 11

                                                  In regards to mention of Nazi deathcamp imagery on 9front’s site, they’ve removed the image in question and updated the page with an explanation:

                                                  Once upon a time, khm was searching for rails documentation and accidentally hit the Images link. In the first page of results was a photo of the train tracks of Auschwitz. Its presence among the Ruby on Rails logos was so absurd and out of place that khm memorialized it. It was made in an era before actual Nazis had re-entered the public dialogue, so it felt like Google Image Search was denigrating Ruby on Rails by including this sort of imagery in the results.

                                                  Generally speaking, 4chan types read it as an endorsement, which sucks. More recently, people who are not assholes have also begun to read it as an endorsement, which is even more unfortunate. Finally, the people who just get mad about things on social media have begun nesting in it. As a result, this image has been targeted for redaction by the 9front Internet Mob Mollification committee.

                                                  Also note the “Nazi punks fuck off” badge has been on 9front’s front page ever since I found out about them.
                                                  I don’t think they condone nazisim, or welcome fascists into their community.

                                                  1. 9

                                                    Also added, for people who didn’t find “Nazi punks fuck off” sufficiently explicit:

                                                    ACHTUNG! 9front absolutely and unalterally opposed to racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, nationalism, ethnocentrism, religious fundamentalism, and oppressive and coercive power structures of all kinds.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      For context. When 9front was still on Google Code they added tags like SOAP, cloud, enterprise, oracle (SOAP being the only thing I certainly remember, but you get the gist). They used that the same way and I am pretty sure they weren’t secretly in love with those things.

                                                      Yes, it’s easy to call call something tasteless, if your taste is different and matches the taste of majority. 9front all the way through is is doing the opposite, so I think the nazi meme stuff is similar. I mean attaching software to ideologies or vice versa (maybe other than licenses) seems odd.

                                                      It’s also not my taste. Attaching political labels to some one based on memes they find funny seems really off though.

                                                      There is a more fitting comparison maybe. Nero Burning Rom, which I have seen criticized for being named after a violent dictator and making a joke out of it. It was actually compared with Nazis as well.

                                                      I think people should judged by overall sentiment, actions, and what they actually say, not something that manages to cause such a discussion.

                                                      Of course I cannot look into someones mind, so certainly also not saying that there isn’t such a reason behind it, but since it can easily be interpreted as joke, ironically and there is nothing indicating more than that I would go by giving the benefit of the doubt.

                                                      Yes, stay vigilant, but let’s not turn this into thought police.

                                                      1. 4

                                                        Yeah, sure…they put up “we’re not -ism or -phobia we swear” and took down the Nazi pr0n. After vocally arguing why they should’t have to and we’ve done nothing wrong and anyone who had a problem with it are “the people who just get mad about things on social media”. Instead of saying “Whoa! We put up a picture of fucking Auschwitz? Hey lemme delete that right now”.

                                                        The optics are less than optimal.

                                                        1. 7

                                                          When I went to the killing fields in Cambodia there was this audio tour where a survivor narrated the place as you walked around. For reference, there were children sticking their hands through the fences trying to beg money from the rich tourists wandering around the mass grave (the grave was one of very many killing fields, it wasn’t a special one or anything, the cambodian genocide was seriously super horrific). Every time it rains more bones will come out of the ground so they have a collection bucket at the exit if you find any bones while walking through. At the entrance there is a monument that is a tower full of human skulls.

                                                          The walk features such things as the tree where they killed children by bashing their heads against it (apparently more efficient than using other means) and of course there is a permanent bloodstain and the bark is eroded where the impact would happen.

                                                          As I was going through this tour I was thinking “why on earth am I here, this is literally the most horrific thing I’ve ever seen! Who would have the capacity to do this???”

                                                          But at the end of the tour the voice begs and pleads: “Please do not allow this atrocity to be forgotten, we must remember that these things have happened so that we do not grow complacent thinking that ‘nobody would do such a thing’. We must never let such a thing happen again.” (paraphrased since I don’t remember what he said verbatim).

                                                          This stuck with me and since then I have become better aware of other such events, for example visiting Rwanda you can feel the scar in the culture. “Dancing in the Glory of Monsters” is a book that if you can stomach it (I wasn’t able to) shows you how the Rwandan genocide is still ongoing in the Congo…. Speaking of, I know people from Venezuela and their refugee crysis has grown faster and further than the Syrian one and their current situation is tragic.

                                                          These countries are being torn apart by the wealth they hold (and I believe the vultures that we admire for how much money they can stockpile must be held responsible if we want to start doing anything about this - but that is another matter).

                                                          However even though I have very strong feelings on the matter and even though I have good friends from Venezuela that are affected by the crysis there, still.. I will not fault you for showing me a picture of Venezuela!

                                                          Actually. I’m quite triggered that you consider it immoral to show a picture of Auschwitz. Repressing memories is not a good way to come to terms with reality, when a loved one dies it is better to honor their memory and respect whatever force it was that destroyed them. Rather than acting like nothing ever happened while you desperately try to hold onto your ignorance of the evils in the world.

                                                          IF I ever use the word “hate” with all the weight that it holds then I will use it to describe these symptom-treating efforts that ultimately undermine any efforts at real healing.

                                                          1. 10

                                                            If someone was to use one of the many horrific images from the Cambodian killing fields as a reaction image comparing different programming languages, would you consider it a good way of honoring the victims?

                                                            1. 2

                                                              No admittedly not, but it’d be a good opportunity to start a reasonable discussion with whoever is responsible (probably a child[ish] person).

                                                              Deciding unilaterally where the line is and then dogmatically shaming is what I take issue with.

                                                              Edit: not advocating infinite patience but maybe one or two iterations of reserved judgment would go a long way towards defusing misunderstandings or having differing values clashing.

                                                            2. 8

                                                              Actually. I’m quite triggered that you consider it immoral to show a picture of Auschwitz

                                                              Context is important here. Showing a picture on a historical/educational website is great, showing it on some edgy website for a fringe OS is completely tasteless.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                Well there was further context with the ruby thing and then inertia took over. Idk it’s obviously not the appropriate context but all it would take is a caption with some platitude and a link to educational resource for it to be suddenly a brave gesture to keep the memory alive… people are fickle.

                                                            3. 3

                                                              You seem very hard to please, context and time changes, they took it down.

                                                              1. 7
                                                                • Puts up a photo of Auschwitz
                                                                • Shouts all over Mastodon how it’s not going to be removed, claiming it “provokes thought instead of dogma” and any opinion to the contrary is “breathless internet pearl-clutching” (lmao sounds like somebody’s thought ain’t being provoked!)
                                                                • Removes it, adds snark towards the author of this article and attributes the removal to mollifying an internet mob

                                                                nah, sounds like not much has changed at all

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  The snark isn’t entirely unwarranted, especially considering how the author of this article felt the need to include 2 paragraphs about how the 9front devs are awful, terrible people for not immediately doing exactly what he asked.

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    Nah: the author of the article asked a question on Mastodon that most people would have – “why is there nazi imagery associated with this project” – and after one follow up question a 9front dev[1] blew him off as “starting an internet witch hunt”.

                                                                    [1]: That’d be you, yes? Typically it’s good form to say “here’s my side of things” so people know you aren’t just a dispassionate observer sharing their opinion.

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      (no, that is not me. I’m not involved in 9front at all, besides occasionally looking at it and booting it up on a pi to see how it’s going. I am truly a dispassionate observer here– thanks for trying to root me out though!)

                                                                      It is important to look at the tone of the discussion here: the author opens with “I am now used to the FQA being frankly not worth the 1s and 0s it was written in” (a very kind dismissal of someone’s work!) and then immediately poking and prodding about who, exactly, committed the image. It’s understandable that someone would get defensive if that happened. At this point the aftermath is pointless social media bullshit and is probably off-topic to this site.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        (no, that is not me. I’m not involved in 9front at all, besides occasionally looking at it and booting it up on a pi to see how it’s going. I am truly a dispassionate observer here– thanks for trying to root me out though!)

                                                                        Fair enough – I thought I caught a whiff of username overlap but there’s really only 26^2 bits of information there for me to key off ;).

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          It is important to look at the tone of the discussion here

                                                                          If this is really the worst thing you can pull out about what I’ve written online I’d say that’s not bad. Can you provide me an example of where I’m apparently poking and prodding about who, exactly, committed the image? Because the only person I asked about was here with reasons for asking in the question. I didn’t know when I asked but it turns out the info is publicly available anyway.

                                                                          the author opens with “I am now used to the FQA being frankly not worth the 1s and 0s it was written in” (a very kind dismissal of someone’s work!)

                                                                          No I don’t. This isn’t even in the linked article. It was taken from part of this mastodon conversation between two people. It’s in reference to the state of the FQA where I’d written notes to submit to fill gaps until I saw the image. I find it odd to assert a frustration shared as part of a discussion between two people is a dismissal when the document itself says:

                                                                          ACHTUNG! Information provided by this document is UNOFFICIAL and may be outdated or just plain WRONG

                                                                          This is certainly an accurate statement, as evidenced by section 8.3.2 of the FQA. This was one of the places where I’d written notes for the FQA. Feel free to share any insight into Acme that cyclogram image gives you.

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            Yes, the discussion where the maintainer got upset opened with “I am now used to the FQA…” I’m not sure why you’re being pedantic here. The article also opens with “ The FQA is more harmful than good.”, two dismissals. And you did poke and prod: I would say asking two separate times about who created and/or committed the controversial image would be somewhat hair-raising.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              Yes, the discussion where the maintainer got upset opened with

                                                                              The discussion opened with the “What in the actual fuck” post, and KHM replied to dogstar’s post on the thread, not to mine.

                                                                              The article also opens with “ The FQA is more harmful than good.

                                                                              That statement is over 400 words into the piece. It is not the opening. Stop with the obvious falsehoods.

                                                                              And again, you’ve been unable to link to the poking and prodding because I already linked to the question I asked about who, which contains the reasoning for the question in the toot. Given you claim to be “truly a dispassionate observer here” it is clear you have an axe to grind. I will not discuss this with you further here as there is nothing either of us can say that would add to the conversation.

                                                                      2. 3

                                                                        how the author of this article felt the need to include 2 paragraphs about how the 9front devs are awful, terrible people for not immediately doing exactly what he asked.

                                                                        1. Please tell me where in the post I said the devs are awful, terrible people.
                                                                        2. Please show me a link where I’ve asked for the devs to take an immediate specific course of action.

                                                                        You can’t because I did neither of those things. In fact it specifically says in the article that “9Front doesn’t owe me change”. If you’re going to say things that are untrue it helps if it’s not immediately verifiable. I’ve flagged this because it’s both untrue and doesn’t add to the discussion.

                                                                        1. 2
                                                                          1. “… and those feeling welcomed by it. My concerns lay with the 3rd group. The Nazi death camp joke author was so courteous…”

                                                                          Emphasis mine. Come on man, are you really trying to argue that this is neutral? Where I come from, insinuating that a dev team are nazis is definitely saying that they’re bad people.

                                                                          1. “ Update: The “9Front Internet Mob Mollification committee” huffed, puffed, some of them called me bad names then took it down.”

                                                                          so this was your goal? What was your goal otherwise? In the mastodon thread, why were you trying to hold your (much desired, I’m sure) FQA additions over their heads?

                                                                          If you don’t owe 9front any change, why mention them at all unless you want to punish them for some indiscretion? It doesn’t change the article in any way.

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            You keep cutting parts of things out, so I’ll put this here once.

                                                                            There are 3 types of people who’ll see it - Those who won’t use 9Front because of it, those whose choice is unaffected by it, and those feeling welcomed by it. My concerns lay with the 3rd group.

                                                                            I’m very clearly talking about people who would’ve seen the picture. Not 9Front Devs. People who look at stuff like that and think “Yeah, this is for me”.

                                                                            The Nazi death camp joke author was so courteous

                                                                            Look at the actual discussion thread and you will see how courteous the author was. I stand by my words, I did not say the devs were awful, terrible people as you falsely claimed.

                                                                            Update: The “9Front Internet Mob Mollification committee” huffed, puffed, some of them called me bad names then took it down.

                                                                            As it says, this is in a post-publish update, not the piece when you originally claimed. Just so we’re clear. The “9Front Internet Mob Moillification Committee” is a direct quote from the FQA text in Appendix L as represented in Mercurial.

                                                                            Huffed and puffed, some of them called me bad names - you can see all this here as well as in the mastodon thread.

                                                                            You’ve claimed to be truly a dispassionate observer. That claim is demonstrably false. You haven’t been able to link to a request for change because I never made one. You haven’t been able to show me calling the devs “awful, terrible people” because I never said that. Given that you’re obviously trolling I see no reason to engage further here, it won’t add anything to the overall discussion.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              Huffed and puffed, some of them called me bad names - you can see all this here as well as in the mastodon thread.

                                                                              There’s a saying: “If there are 10 normal people and 1 Nazi sitting at a table, there are 11 Nazis sitting at a table”. I know you’re aware of it, not only because it’s widely used, but because it was brought up in one of the threads you linked. You dismissed it. You were wrong to dismiss it.

                                                                              So, your insinuations, amplification of links to accusations, while insisting /your’e/ not saying anything is simply dancing around the edges of saying some very serious things about me and my friends, while not taking any responsibility.

                                                                              And, even worse: I believe on Mastodon, you implied that there was specific information you got via private messages. If this is true, and you did not speak out, then you’re also depriving me and my friends of tools cut these supposed shitbags off.

                                                                              So, either you’re helping spread baseless rumors about me and the company I keep, or you’re leaving me an accessory to the ideology that lead to the cold blooded murder of my family. I’m fairly certain it’s the former.

                                                                              And you’re wondering why I’m a little unhappy. Are you serious?

                                                                              It’s strange. It’s like you don’t actually grasp what’s being said – just words.

                                                                              Maybe it will click now.

                                                                              Or, if you ever end up in Jerusalem, maybe you can go to Yad Vashem. Maybe that will make it click. At least you could get a sensible, polite chuckle out of the make of the elevator they use to get in to the compound: Schindler’s Lifts.

                                                                              (And yes. There’s the question about gallows humor and why I accept, and even enjoy it. There’s a discussion to be had, and even academic papers to be read, about how it undermines oppression, both as an attack and as a defense, but I’m not keen to have it. Let’s leave it explained as me being an immature shithead with no taste. It saves breath, and I’m happy with that epiphet.. I will, however, point out that you can find (IMO) spicier Nazi jokes on fairly mainstream Israeli TV.)

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                                                                                You’ve come into a thread where I wasn’t talking to you after you called me all kinds of names and swore at me on HN.

                                                                                know you’re aware of it, not only because it’s widely used, but because it was brought up in one of the threads you linked. You dismissed it. You were wrong to dismiss it.

                                                                                So you’re going through my Mastodon posts as well looking to cherry pick. You know full well I said:

                                                                                I’m not sure I agree with that last point. There is definitely a problem, but I think/hope the problem is more one of maturity than wolves in the flock.

                                                                                In a thread where the commentator thanked me for “calling the 9front people out on their nazi bullshit”. If I hadn’t responded I’m sure you’d be here now saying my lack of response would imply I agreed with their statement.

                                                                                You don’t know me. Our only interactions have involved you swearing at me, calling me names or accusing me. Please look at your own actions and stop harassing me. I will not respond to more of your harassment.

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                                                                      I think kjs3 is trying to say that putting up a picture of Auschwitz is so unbelievably tasteless to a lot of people, that there should not be a discussion as to why it should be removed. This place of unbelievable crimes should never be used as an edgy joke. We all must be better than that.

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                                                                  With context, it does sound kind of funny, and it might be the sort of thing I would have shared privately (with context) to friends or some such. But putting it up without context on a public FAQ is a pretty big failure in understanding that without this context, it just looks weird and out of place, at best.

                                                                  Something like “heil Hitler” can be a literal endorsement of Hitler, but it can also be a joke (possibly in bad taste, but a joke nonetheless), or a statement against authoritarianism. Context is everything, and I don’t know why there’s such a failure to understand this from the 9front people. I suppose some of the more outlandish “oh, they must be literal Nazis then!” probably doesn’t help.

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                                                                    I don’t understand what context would make someone think that image was anything other than an excessive attack on Ruby on Rails.

                                                                    Do you know anyone that looks at that image and thinks “I love Rails, and therefore the juxtaposition must therefore that extermination camps are good!”?

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                                                                    I take these accusations with a grain of salt, because they seem superficial. I’m yet to hear someone call them communists because they have the manifesto of the communist party in their repo. To me, it always was like a subversion of “”“optics”””, explicitly aimed at people who take one look and come to conclusions like OP, but I guess, when it doubt, people are Nazis (also known as not-“a political movement situated in the specific context of post-WW1 Germany”).

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                                                                      The text of the Communist Manifesto replaced the text of Mein Kampf that was in the repo earlier.

                                                                      It’s easiest if everyone just assumes the 9Front developers are 4chan-inflected trolls. It doesn’t really detract from the quality of the code, but it probably makes people considering contributing pause.

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                                                                    Amazing! I love the simplicity of this! Working in a high-security form myself requiring security clearance, I’m tempted to put some equivalent of this on my Macbook :D

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                                                                      Thanks for the kind words!
                                                                      You’re in luck, because usbkill does work on Darwin! (Supposedly. It hasn’t been updated since 2016 by the looks of it).

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                                                                        Awesome! :D

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                                                                      Only reading one book at the moment; Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, by Gail Honeyman. Not my usual style, but it’s quite decent and has its moments.

                                                                      I plan on reading a lot this year. On my next up list is:

                                                                      • Ubik, and other novels by Philip K. Dick
                                                                      • Continue the Sprawl trilogy by William Gibson (I’ve read Neuromancer)
                                                                      • Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury
                                                                      • Dune, by Frank Herbert
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                                                                        I picked up Dune over the holiday period, but it feels pretty slow going so far, although I’ve heard such great things I’m going to push through.

                                                                        Otherwise, I’ve also been going through programming Phoenix 1.4, to get more up to speed with Phoenix and start writing more Elixir in my spare time.

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                                                                          Dune is fantastic, though it pays to remember the era in which it was written.

                                                                          I will say though, and with sadness, that the sequels were just…not good (obviously that’s subjective but a lot of people seem to agree).

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                                                                            I thought Dune Messiah felt like the actual ending to Dune. Like the publishers cut it out of the first one and then turned it into another book after Dune got popular. It was much less action and a lot more internal philosophizing though.

                                                                          2. 2

                                                                            Just read Dune too. And I’ve been working on my Phoenix skills as well. Almost done with Programming Ecto and it surprisingly has made me feel much more confident with Phoenix than the Phoenix book. Understanding the data portion of applications always seems to make things click for me.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              Dune’s on my list of books to read next.

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                I started reading Dune a month ago but abandoned it midway through because it was not interesting. I know, I know… I would highly recommend Children Of Time by Adrian Chaikovsky.

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                                                                                  I read Children of Time and it’s sequel Children of Ruin, and I absolutely loved every minute of it, I couldn’t get enough!

                                                                                  Are there any other books that you enjoyed as much?

                                                                                2. 1

                                                                                  I re-read Dune and Heretics of Dune (the first book in the series I read) and Dune is the real deal. It’s essential (English-language) SF!

                                                                                  http://gerikson.com/blog/books/read/Dune-and-Heretics.html

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                                                                                  I really want to try kakoune, but the idea of starting over with a new editor and editing paradigm just seems like so much effort and time before I’m productive.

                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                    I feel the same way. I use NeoVim and have tried to keep it as stock config as possible, but I think I’ve already tweaked it enough to be different enough. So learning Kakoune would be against vim everywhere and my customization.

                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                      If you like the vi/vim experience but want some similar features to Kakoune then vis might be worth a shot. (Also see differences from Kakoune).
                                                                                      I use it as my main editor and structural regular expressions, multi-cursor, etc are all quite intuitive while not leaving the traditional vi-like modal editing world IMO.

                                                                                      Plugins are also written in Lua, if that’s your thing.

                                                                                    2. 2

                                                                                      YMMV of course, but it only took ~2 weeks after switching from vim for me to become reasonably productive in kakoune.

                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                        What was the biggest hurdle for you when acclimating to Kakoune?

                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                          Not OP, but as someone else who went from Vim to Kakoune, I think the biggest shift for me was thinking in terms of repeatedly narrowing the selection and then doing one single command on the selection, rather than doing a command sequence and e.g. assigning to a macro or the like. The better I got at selection narrowing, the easier and more natural everything felt. Learning slightly different keystrokes was comparatively very easy.

                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            On day 1 it was 100% unlearning vim muscle memory. After that my biggest challenge was adapting to kakoune’s selection first editing model, which is what inspired me to switch in the first place. It was very worth it though, the incremental nature of the editing in which intermediate results are instantly visible makes complex tasks much more intuitive.

                                                                                          2. 1

                                                                                            I’m coming from emacs, which is probably going to be worse, but even two weeks sounds like an enormous amount of time to not be able to code. I can’t justify taking more than a day to switch at work, so I’d have to use both, too.

                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                              It’s not that I wasn’t able to code at all but that I was significantly slower than I was with vim. I quickly gained speed over the first week though and after ~2 weeks I didn’t feel like my inexperience with editor was holding me back for basic editing tasks. More advanced editing tasks weren’t intolerably slow either, just took a bit more thought than they do now.

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                                                                                          My favourite use case for systemd user services is sneaky backdoors that disappear when users log in: https://hosakacorp.net/p/systemd-user.html

                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            This is awesome. I ran systemctl --user on my system, and there’s so much noise there (from units that handle mounts and so much other stuff you wouldn’t consider a ‘service’) that even if something malicious existed it would be hard to immediately spot. And it would be impossible to spot if it used a name that made it look like one of the noise.

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                                                                                              It’s better to run systemctl --user list-dependencies as it would give you a better overview of the services you (probably) care about.

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                                                                                                oh, thanks, that’s much better. Though, does this show the sneaky backdoor services that OP mentioned?

                                                                                            2. 2

                                                                                              Wow. That’s fantastic!

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                This is great, thanks for sharing. Def an argument here for a systemd –user whitelist or a reminder to check the noise from time to time

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                                                                                                  It gets even better, I haven’t ever published it because I actually use it on red teams but there are ways to use the dependency checks on services to essentially create very difficult to kill back door by making multiple systemd user backdoors that depend on each other and also create and enable more of themselves hydra style. You can also have them running and clean themselves up so that there are no on-disk service files for even more nastiness. Lots of fun to be had everywhere!

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                                                                                                    Seems like this should be reported if it hasn’t been already…

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                                                                                                      The security reporting process is a bit nebulous and hard to approach, so I think it’s valuable to explain why it’s not actually a reportable issue. The ability to create these unit files is intended functionality using allowed user rights, I’m not actually breaking any security here. The reason why this seems like an “issue” is the difference between a vulnerability and a persistence technique, I’m not actually breaking any security assumptions with this, so there would be no reason for there to be something like say… a CVE, which most people are familiar with.

                                                                                                      There are places where this is documented as a potential security impacting place that requires additional monitoring for indicators of compromise, such as in the MITRE ATT&CK framework. In fact this technique and the Metasploit module I wrote for it are referenced in ATT&CK in the 4th reference.

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                                                                                                I did not know OpenBSD’s ksh had support for autocomplete and I’ve been using it for around 2 years now.
                                                                                                I suppose I’ve never really needed it but I may add a couple autocomplete entries now that I know it exists.

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                                                                                                  I pretty much only read RSS feeds on my phone. I use Feeder.
                                                                                                  I’m open to other suggestions too.

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                                                                                                    I was half expecting this link to lead to a deleted Tweet…

                                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                                      Well, the first link in the post actually seems to do just that.